or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Android fragmentation predicted to squeeze out independent developers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Android fragmentation predicted to squeeze out independent developers

post #1 of 74
Thread Starter 
The plethora of distinct mobile device models on the market, driven largely by the popularity of Google's Android platform, is making it more difficult for independent software developers to reach a wide audience, new research confirms.

Flurry


In a post to the official Flurry Blog, Dr. Mary Ellen Gordon, PhD, used stats from the mobile analytics firm to show how difficult it can be for developers to offer compatibility. Based on the data, if a developer wanted to have their application available to 80 percent of the smartphone market, the software would need to be compatible with 156 different device models.

Of course this issue, known as "fragmentation," is largely driven by Google's Android platform, a mobile operating system that appears on a number of devices from a variety of hardware makers, many of which lock their handsets and prevent users from upgrading to the latest version. And some companies, such as Amazon, have forked the Android open-source platform to make their own unique operating system, further complicating matter.

Because of this, Gordon said indie developers may be becoming an "endangered species," and she suggested the market for app development could be "ripe for consolidation."

"We expect a future in which app developers are less frequently individuals with a creative idea and a laptop, and more frequently companies designed to develop, produce and distribute apps at scale," Gordon said.

Flurry


Flurry's data shows that the greatest chance of success for independent developers will likely come from Apple's iOS platform, which allows applications to reach the widest range of users while developing for a relatively small number of hardware variations.

In addition, iOS users average more app sessions per active device than devices running competing platforms, like Android, BlackBerry or Windows Phone.

"This further clarifies why developer support for iOS is disproportionate to iOS's share of the installed device space," Gordon said. "Developers can reach more active devices by developing for a smaller number of device models on iOS and they can also capture the attention of very active users."

Apple's lead among active app use also remains when the data is broken down based on device manufacturers. In this measurement, Amazon device users come in a a close second in terms of application use, while Samsung takes third.

As handset makers are expanding their product lines to provide customers with more options, Gordon expects that it will only become more difficult for developers to optimize, test and support their applications.

"And yet doing exactly that is likely to be increasingly important for app developers, given the market for apps is also becoming more crowded and competitive, making negative user experiences more damaging," she said.
post #2 of 74
This is one huge reason why Android is not being accepted into mainstream businesses. Restaurants, Airlines, Government, Corporate, etc... almost all using iOS. Why? It's consistent.

I'm sure the Android fanboys will once again go into denial and say the tired "Well, at least Android is 'open'" nonsense.

Android is a huge, fragmented mess.
post #3 of 74

An article about app development, written by a major in Political Science.  That makes sense.

 

In reality, there's only a handful of major display sizes and device types to target.

 

Same as with iOS, most Android apps work with even a fairly old OS version, since the APIs most apps need were already in there years ago.  

 

Click bait.

post #4 of 74

I always get confused by people worried about fragmentation. For the love of God, Mac and PC developers have long dealt with variety of hardware configurations and display resolutions.

post #5 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

An article about app development, written by a major in Political Science.  That makes sense.

In reality, there's only a handful of major display sizes and device types to target.

Same as with iOS, most Android apps work with even a fairly old OS version, since the APIs most apps need were already in there years ago.  

Click bait.

There have been quite a few major developers who have made the same charges. There are a multitude of screen resolutions and new sizes every two months. That's just the ones getting pushed. If the new apps will work anyway why update the OS? Are you saying that none of features implemented in the last two and a half years should be used in the apps?
post #6 of 74
Android tablets fragmentation is even sadder, there is no standard for resolution, dimension and aspect ratio.
post #7 of 74

Especially as a gamer, I feel sad when "safe"/"conservative" development is the norm. Little companies doing crazy things are a lot of fun!

 

The "safe" copycatting on every platform is bad enough. Don't make the lack of innovation any worse!

post #8 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

I always get confused by people worried about fragmentation. For the love of God, Mac and PC developers have long dealt with variety of hardware configurations and display resolutions.
Phones and tablets are not PC's. There are fundamental differences in the underlying architectures that make this a minor issue for PC's while being much more severe in mobile devices.

Do you want to see your 32GB tablet only have 16GB free because of the bloated OS that can run on any hardware no matter the difference?

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply
post #9 of 74

I honestly believe that Google purchased Moto for 2 reasons: 1, to stave off Samsung's meteoric rise in the Android world to some degree, as has been rumored.  And 2, to produce a line of phones (like Nexus) that will partially solve the fragmentation problem.  The Nexus phones are the first to receive Android updates and the line isn't as fragmented as phones produced by other manufacturers.

 

Having said that, it's going to be very interesting to see how Android plays out over the next few years.  There's no doubt that fragmentation is frustrating for developers.  My money is on Google reining in Android, and Samsung/others either complying or forking the OS like Amazon has already done.  Talk about fragmentation if that happens!

post #10 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

An article about app development, written by a major in Political Science.  That makes sense.

In reality, there's only a handful of major display sizes and device types to target.

Same as with iOS, most Android apps work with even a fairly old OS version, since the APIs most apps need were already in there years ago.  

Click bait.
Ad hominem? Implying they are wrong because of their degree? Sad.

There are a lot more than you claim. Besides all the different screen resolutions you have devices with different SoC's, GPU's, different versions of BT, different implementations for USB, different versions of Android, Touchwiz vs Sense vs......

If I want to write a basic App it's easy to target all devices. But what developer wants to limit what they can do to the lowest common denominator?

Android is a fragmented mess regardless of what the fanboys try to claim.

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply
post #11 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post

There have been quite a few major developers who have made the same charges.

 

Not really.  It's the junior developers or ones new to screen independence that have the problem.

 

Most figure it out, such as Rovio, who eneded up doing a great job of Angry Birds running on virtually every new and old Android device.  It just takes the right mindset... one which btw, Apple also needs to break out of their display resolution cage.

 

Quote:
 There are a multitude of screen resolutions and new sizes every two months. 

 

Again, not really.  They're just variations on a theme.  Well written apps work just fine and fill the display, even if the display is a bit different.   

 

This is unlike most iOS apps, where the extra iPhone 5 display space is still not being addressed.

 

Quote:
That's just the ones getting pushed. If the new apps will work anyway why update the OS? Are you saying that none of features implemented in the last two and a half years should be used in the apps?

 

No, I'm saying that, same as with iOS, the overwhelming majority of apps don't require the latest APIs.

 

Android started out with core features such as third party multitasking and voice I/O long ago.  Much of its updates have been more about visuals and speed, than required APIs.

post #12 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post


There are a lot more than you claim. Besides all the different screen resolutions you have devices with different SoC's, GPU's, different versions of BT, different implementations for USB, different versions of Android, Touchwiz vs Sense vs......

If I want to write a basic App it's easy to target all devices. But what developer wants to limit what they can do to the lowest common denominator?

Android is a fragmented mess regardless of what the fanboys try to claim.

How many different screen resolutions, SoC's, GPU's, are there for iOS devices currently? How many iOS devices have front facing cameras? How many are GPS capable?

post #13 of 74

No fragmentation in Android?

 

Consider this, straight from the horse's mouth:

 

Supporting Multiple Screens

 

Although the system performs scaling and resizing to make your application work on different screens, you should make the effort to optimize your application for different screen sizes and densities. In doing so, you maximize the user experience for all devices

also:

 

be aware that Android 3.2 has introduced new APIs that allow you to more precisely control the layout resources your application uses for different screen sizes.

 

but these APIs are not available to the majority of Android devices, yes, even as of now, most Android Devices are running 2.6.3 or below:

again, straight from the horse's mouth:

 

Current Distribution of Android Devices Accessing Google Play

 

 

Consider the irony of my experience:

I have an iPhone 3GS purchased in Nov 2009, it shipped with iOS 3 but was officially upgraded to the current iOS 6.1.2.

 

I purchased a Samsung Galaxy Y in April 2012, it was officially stuck on the already obsolete Gingerbread.

 

The Galaxy Y was replaced with a Sony Experia Tipo in June 2012.  That came with 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

Sony have just announced they won't be producing an official upgrade for the Tipo to 4.2 Jelly Bean.

 

It's amazing that a four year old phone can be kept more easily up to date than a phone less than a year old.

post #14 of 74
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

No, I'm saying that, same as with iOS, the overwhelming majority of apps don't require the latest APIs.

 

which will lead to most developers not bothering to support new features offered by more recent Android versions and APIs, and thus most android manufacturers not bothering with the extra complexity of dealing with a more recent Android version.

 

This may go some way to explaining why the bulk of Android devices are 2.6.3 or below.

 

In contrast, my four year old iPhone 3GS with its current iOS can take advantage of the latest programmes with the latest APIs.

post #15 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post

No fragmentation in Android?

 

Consider this, straight from the horse's mouth:

 

Supporting Multiple Screens

 

also:

 

 

but these APIs are not available to the majority of Android devices, yes, even as of now, most Android Devices are running 2.6.3 or below:

again, straight from the horse's mouth:

 

Current Distribution of Android Devices Accessing Google Play

 

 

Consider the irony of my experience:

I have an iPhone 3GS purchased in Nov 2009, it shipped with iOS 3 but was officially upgraded to the current iOS 6.1.2.

 

I purchased a Samsung Galaxy Y in April 2012, it was officially stuck on the already obsolete Gingerbread.

 

The Galaxy Y was replaced with a Sony Experia Tipo in June 2012.  That came with 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

Sony have just announced they won't be producing an official upgrade for the Tipo to 4.2 Jelly Bean.

 

It's amazing that a four year old phone can be kept more easily up to date than a phone less than a year old.

iPhone 3G S 16GB - £440

Galaxy Y - £120

Xperia Tipo - £90

 

Budget phones not supported to the same standard as a premium phone that cost 4x as much SHOCKER!!! 

 

Film at 11.

post #16 of 74

Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post

iPhone 3G S 16GB - £440

Galaxy Y - £120

Xperia Tipo - £90

 

Budget phones not supported to the same standard as a premium phone that cost 4x as much SHOCKER!!! 

 

Film at 11.

 

stike vomit thinks big letters and shouting will make him right.  SHOCKER!

 

 

BUDGET PHONES GET UPDATES TOO!*  SHOCKER!

*though much less likely from Samsung or Sony

 

 

NOKIA Asha 203 SIM-FREE £50

It was launched as a budget phone in 2012 yet Nokia has already released several software updates

 

Support for your Nokia Asha 203

 

Credit where credit is due, Apple and Nokia believe in strong after-sales support.

post #17 of 74

ipad 1/2 - 9'7" screen - 1,024 × 768 pixels at 132 ppi
ipad 3/4 - 9'7" screen - 2,048 × 1,536 pixels at 264 ppi
ipad mini - 7.9" screen - 1,024 × 768 pixels at 163 ppi
 

fragmentation?
 

post #18 of 74

It looks like this is a trend that will rise on both platforms. Big companies can churn games out and see what sticks. EA has released over 1,000 games for iOS and don't care if only a small percentage make a splash. Small companies can't do that and often have to bet the farm on their first app. It's also much harder to get exposure and into the all-important top 50 apps if you're not a big brand.

 

Let's hope that Apple continues to push indie apps like Paper and The Room. 

post #19 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrustyMcLovin View Post

ipad 1/2 - 9'7" screen - 1,024 × 768 pixels at 132 ppi

ipad 3/4 - 9'7" screen - 2,048 × 1,536 pixels at 264 ppi

ipad mini - 7.9" screen - 1,024 × 768 pixels at 163 ppi

 
fragmentation?

 

Ah yes, avoiding the iPhone and iPod Touch there I see. How convenient.

Tell me, how many of those iPad 1s are running the latest version of iOS?
post #20 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post


Credit where credit is due, Apple and Nokia believe in strong after-sales support.

Tell that to the iPad 1 owners. Or the poor bastards who bought Nokia WP7 phones expecting an update to WP8.
post #21 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post

Tell that to the iPad 1 owners. Or the poor bastards who bought Nokia WP7 phones expecting an update to WP8.

Before you make a fool of yourself, you might want to check the facts.

iPad 1 was introduced in 2010 with iPhone OS 3.2. It was upgradeable for 2 years to iOS 5.1.1. So two years and two full versions of upgrades.

In contrast, the majority of Android devices NEVER see an upgrade (or, at best, perhaps a point upgrade). That's why 50% of Android devices are still running a 2 year old version of the OS.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #22 of 74
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post
Ah yes, avoiding the iPhone and iPod Touch there I see. How convenient.

Tell me, how many of those iPad 1s are running the latest version of iOS?

 

Thanks for introducing a completely different argument that has nothing whatsoever to do with what he's talking about. But I'll go ahead and respond to it by saying that a five year old device that can't have the newest OS (iOS) and a five month old device that can't have the newest OS (Android) aren't comparable.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #23 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Not really.  It's the junior developers or ones new to screen independence that have the problem.

 

Most figure it out, such as Rovio, who eneded up doing a great job of Angry Birds running on virtually every new and old Android device.  It just takes the right mindset... one which btw, Apple also needs to break out of their display resolution cage

 

 

Yes Really to quote rovio themselves in a gigaohm article:

 

Android fragmentation is a serious issue for developers. In its tweets, Rovio Mobile said it began working on the Android version of Angry Birds in the spring. But the company said it took a long time to test for all the different Android devices to ensure they worked well. “Main challenge with Android is the amount of different devices. They are all different. Takes forever to test,” the company said tweeted. In the end, there are still devices like the HTC Hero and Sony Ericsson X10 that appear to have problems running the game. By comparison, porting over Angry Birds to webOS earlier this year only took a “few hours.” This could be a growing problem for Android developers as the number and variety of devices proliferates.

 

 

Even rovio tells us that it is a huge pain in the arse to port to android and that there are still android phones that wont or have a difficult time running angry birds.  Android is the problem with its horrible fragmentation.  They also said in the same article that paid game models like on iOS dont work on android because of the mindset of the users.  People want freemium games on android. A game they can download for free and just click the ads out of the way.

post #24 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post


Tell that to the iPad 1 owners. Or the poor bastards who bought Nokia WP7 phones expecting an update to WP8.

Look at the current android distribution from developer.android.com

 

 

Version Codename API Distribution
1.6 Donut 4 0.2%
2.1 Eclair 7 1.9%
2.2 Froyo 8 7.6%
2.3 - 2.3.2 Gingerbread 9 0.2%
2.3.3 - 2.3.7 10 44%
3.1 Honeycomb 12 0.3%
3.2 13 0.9%
4.0.3 - 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich 15 28.6%
4.1 Jelly Bean 16 14.9%
4.2 17 1.6%

Thats horrible  44% of android devices still running gingerbread!!  Only 16.4% running the latest two os's!  This is from googles developer sight.

Contrast this with iOS 83% are currently running iOS 6.0 6.1,  6.1.1, 6.1.2 or 6.1.3  all of the last three are small point revisions to fix certain bugs like the microsoft exchange bug.   No one will convince me that android is not an utter disaster of fragmentation.

post #25 of 74

Here is a link to wikipedia for iOS device support with different iOS devices.  Its a good chart.  But one thing it shows is a vastly bigger amount of support for iOS devices running newer versions of iOS than android devices running there latest os.  Most iOS devices get 4 to 5 generations of support with new versions of iOS.

Contrast that to android still running 44% of there devices on gingerbread with no hope of an upgrade.

 

Hell iOS 6 can even still run on the 3GS albeit with features missing but it still can.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOS_version_history


Edited by Mechanic - 3/5/13 at 4:43pm
post #26 of 74
Why is it when people say android is fragmented they automatically say screen size.

If you code width=800 vs width=100% then you shouldn't even be coding in the first place. Screen size is the least of Androids fragmentation problem
post #27 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Ad hominem? Implying they are wrong because of their degree? Sad.

 

Since you have a frequent history of ad hominem, it's easy to see why you would jump to that conclusion.

 

One of my dear sisters-in-law is also a PoliSci PhD, but I would not task her to write a blog on Android fragmentation using numbers she can chart but clearly wouldn't understand.

 

Heck, anyone who hasn't developed for Android should not be claiming to know what's hard and what isn't.   That's like listening to city dwelling civilians pretending they know what it's like to be in the field in the military.

 

--

 

As for APIs... again, remember that Android itself has long supported the major core things developers need to do.

 

Everything else is gravy, and usually comes as libraries. So what Google does, is release Support Libraries that can be included so that even apps running on really old OS versions (like 1.6) can still use some 3.x and above APIs... such as the screen fragment API for tablets.

 

Thus you can specify a minimum SDK level that's old, and also specify that your app will be compiled against a much newer SDK level.

 

In that case, your app will run on the old OS, but behave like it's on a newer version.

post #28 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post

Yes Really to quote rovio themselves in a gigaohm article:

 

That was an old article back when they first started porting Angry Birds.

 

As I noted, the concept of screen resolution independence was new to them.

 

Later, they said all was good, and also pointed out that they were making more from the Android ad based free version, than from the paid iOS version.

 

I'm not saying there's no problems.  Far from it.  But the things that most people (non-developers) bring up (like display differences), are not the big deals they think they are.  Everything depends on what kind of app you're doing.

post #29 of 74

Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post
Tell that to the iPad 1 owners. Or the poor bastards who bought Nokia WP7 phones expecting an update to WP8.

 

Unlike Samsung's products, every single iOS device has had a major OS upgrade available.

 

Unlike Samsung, Apple's current entire iPhone iPad and iPod Touch lineup runs the current iOS 6.

 

 

 

In the past twelve months Samsung has released Gingerbread phones like the Pocket and the Ace 2.

 

It seems Samsung doesn't want its budget customers to benefit from Android's new APIs.

 

Samsung is partially responsible for the Android fragmentation issue; other manufacturers have made budget Android phones with more recent Android software.

 

 

Comparatively you're much more likely to have your Apple product updated than your Samsung.

post #30 of 74
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post
Unlike Samsung's products, every single iOS device has had at least three major OS upgrades available.

 

Fixed, for further punishment.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #31 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrustyMcLovin View Post

ipad 1/2 - 9'7" screen - 1,024 × 768 pixels at 132 ppi
ipad 3/4 - 9'7" screen - 2,048 × 1,536 pixels at 264 ppi
ipad mini - 7.9" screen - 1,024 × 768 pixels at 163 ppi
 
fragmentation?

Not really...

All iPads have the same aspect ratio... which solves one problem. And the Retina/non-Retina issue is handled by making graphical assets @2X

Any app designed for a Retina iPad will work on the iPad 2 or iPad Mini. iPads are actually the least worrisome.

The iPhone and iPod Touch did undergo a change in aspect ratio (one change in 6 years... the horror) so developers had some extra work to do. But I think it's safe to say that the iPhone and the iPod Touch will remain 16:9 for the foreseeable future. And Retina graphics have been a part of the iPhone since 2010. So... it may be a little more work to make your apps work on both 3:2 displays and 16:9 displays and Retina/non-Retina.... but apparently developers are doing it.

Apple insists that developers make pixel-perfect graphics in their apps for the exact dimensions of the screen on the device. Is that such a bad thing?

In contrast... Android devices come in all sorts of shapes and resolutions: 15:9, 16:9 and 16:10 for aspect ratios... and a multitude of screen resolutions.

Question: How do you design an app with pixel-perfect accuracy that looks good on a 1920x1080 HTC Droid DNA... a 1280x720 Galaxy SIII... and a 800x480 Galaxy SII ???

Answer: You don't. You must rely on scaling and interpolation... which could result in muddy-looking graphics.

Sure... it might not look that bad... but it's certainly a different philosophy than Apple.
post #32 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post

which will lead to most developers not bothering to support new features offered by more recent Android versions and APIs, and thus most android manufacturers not bothering with the extra complexity of dealing with a more recent Android version.

This may go some way to explaining why the bulk of Android devices are 2.6.3 or below.

In contrast, my four year old iPhone 3GS with its current iOS can take advantage of the latest programmes with the latest APIs.

Also note how Google deceives it's Android cattle by making multiple API inclusions have the same primary version number AND codename.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #33 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Answer: You don't. You must rely on scaling and interpolation... which could result in muddy-looking graphics.

Sure... it might not look that bad... but it's certainly a different philosophy than Apple.

 

Apple used cheap pixel doubling, for goodness's sake.   Talk about scaled-up muddy graphics!

post #34 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Apple used cheap pixel doubling, for goodness's sake.   Talk about scaled-up muddy graphics!

God dammit I can't stand all the bullshit you post. I've never thought anyone was actually a paid shill until you started posting.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #35 of 74

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/21/13 at 4:26pm
post #36 of 74

This article is genius!  This is exactly what happened with computers:  remember when the Mac had one 512x342 monochrome display, and there were apps everywhere, but as soon as we got multiple screen sizes, different color depths, different RAM configurations, and then those newfangled hard drive things, it all went to hell in a handbasket?  Gosh, how can developers ever hope to write software for anything more than a single screen size?  Good gawd, it's never been done before!  It's beyond all possible technology!  Android is doomed!

post #37 of 74
Fragmentation is a problem for developers and customers, both.
post #38 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

God dammit I can't stand all the bullshit you post. I've never thought anyone was actually a paid shill until you started posting.

 

lol

 

Then it must be AI who's paying all these shills you see in your head, because...

 

Who do you think keeps starting all the Samsung and Android related news threads?

 

Hint:  they run the site.

post #39 of 74
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post
Then it must be AI who's paying all these shills you see in your head, because...

 

Who do you think keeps starting all the Samsung and Android related news threads?

 

Hint:  they run the site.

 

The "logic" you're using here makes me want to eat an entire shaker of salt.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #40 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The "logic" you're using here makes me want to eat an entire shaker of salt.

 

I don't blame you.  However, it's as good a "logic" as the ridiculous claims of shills around here.

 

Heck, about a month ago I watched as a well known pro-Apple fanatic came here and started posting.  He was accused of being a shill and you could see his shock.  He protested and listed his Apple background, and even then he was torn to pieces.  He left.  The whole thing was idiotic beyond belief.  It was like watching a group of cannibalistic piranha.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Android fragmentation predicted to squeeze out independent developers