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Android fragmentation predicted to squeeze out independent developers - Page 2

post #41 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

lol

Then it must be AI who's paying all these shills you see in your head, because...

Who do you think keeps starting all the Samsung and Android related news threads?

Hint:  they run the site.

You sound like the kind of guy that would also say, "If she didn't want it she shouldn't have been wearing that."

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #42 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You sound like the kind of guy that would also say, "If she didn't want it she shouldn't have been wearing that."

 

That's an uncalled for remark.  

 

I'm sorry to see it.  You're usually better than that.


Edited by KDarling - 3/5/13 at 7:38pm
post #43 of 74
*sigh* Here we go again with the Android bashing. Quelle surprise, AppleInsider.

This article isn't a study; it's speculation. The author isn't investigating why something has happened; she's guessing that something might happen. I have to wonder if the author knows the first thing about software development. It is not a problem to support multiple devices on Android. The platform was designed to support that. You might want to have a look at the documentation on the subject

Some developers are choosing to target only 4.x because they have more customers on it. Just yesterday, 500px announced that the next version of their app will drop Gingerbread support in the next version because so few of their users are on it. Other developers are having this discussion and generally coming to the same conclusion. Ultimately, backwards compatibility is something each developer has to decide for themselves, but the market is clearly moving in the 4.x direction.

If you do choose to support older devices, the community has lots of tools to help you. And, no, you're not limited to the "the lowest common denominator." Google extracts the new APIs and packages them in a support library which supports older versions back to 1.6. There are a few missing pieces in the support library, but the Android dev community has stepped up to back port them. See ActionBarSherlock, Unified Preferences, NotificationCompat2, and NineOldAndroids, for example. Further, Google provides documentation on writing code that works across versions (http://developer.android.com/training/basics/supporting-devices/platforms.html and http://developer.android.com/training/backward-compatible-ui/index.html).

(Btw, I have to keep making this point every few months. It's almost as if no one on here actually listens or does any fact-checking before they type out an angry anti-Android screed. It's really tedious).

There certainly are features in newer OS releases that can't be backported, like RenderScript or triple-buffering in the graphics layer. And there are security improvements in newer versions (which I was just discussing last night on here). But there's no evidence that any of this is impeding app development. Certainly none was presented in this article.
post #44 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

I don't blame you.  However, it's as good a "logic" as the ridiculous claims of shills around here.

If there was any logic to your comments you'd make a fair and balanced comment every now and then but you don't, instead you claim that Apple's pixel doubling isn't good for developers and customers but some poor choice that only muddy's the graphics despite Apple specifically designing the Retina UIs to be idealized for their respective display.

Now there are certainly those on the opposite end as you that can't see anything negative about Apple but at least their presence here is logical as it's a pro-Apple site.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #45 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

If there was any logic to your comments you'd make a fair and balanced comment every now and then but you don't,

 

Or rather, you don't see them.  

 

Just recently, I've defended iOS from claims of malware,  praised the iPad for its CSS3 abilities, and brought up iOS devices being used by the military (in non secure areas), among other things.

 

I don't create the topics.  I react to mistaken ideas and internet myths. 

 

And I sure don't engage in the vicious personal attacks that some do around here when they lack an intelligent response.

post #46 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

That's an uncalled for remark.  You reveal your true colors.

I'm sorry to see it.  You're usually better than that.

You're the one that made the comment. Would you rather I use "It's their fault for not paying close attention to their luggage?" EIther way your rationalization that's their fault for putting you in this position is weak.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #47 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Or rather, you don't see them.  

Just recently, I've defended iOS from claims of malware, defended Apple programmers for bugs, praised the iPad for its CSS3 abilities, and brought up iOS devices being used by the military (in non secure areas), among other things.

Oh, I've read compliments from you but they comes across as "concern troll" posts with a lot of backhanded comments.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #48 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Oh, I've read compliments from you but they comes across as "concern troll" posts with a lot of backhanded comments.

 

I think that's just a result of the general atmosphere of distrust that dominates this place.

 

Also, where are you from?  Having moved to NJ, I've found that Southern ways of being polite by being understated, are often mistaken by Northerners as some form of deceit ... sad but true  1smile.gif


Edited by KDarling - 3/5/13 at 8:09pm
post #49 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The "logic" you're using here makes me want to eat an entire shaker of salt.

Do it. I double-dare you.
Edited by stike vomit - 3/5/13 at 10:05pm
post #50 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

I think that's just a result of the general atmosphere of distrust that dominates this place.

Also, where are you from?  Having moved to NJ, I've found that Southern ways of being polite by being understated, are often mistaken by Northerners as some form of deceit ... sad but true  1smile.gif

There is nothing polite about making mendacious comments but if you want to go on thinking that adding a smily emoticon to your post means you're a sweet Georgia peach you go right ahead and continue to lie to yourself. At least your as honest with us as you with yourself which is about the only fair and balanced thing I've seen from you.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #51 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Apple used cheap pixel doubling, for goodness's sake.   Talk about scaled-up muddy graphics!

LOL... that was just until developers got on-board with making beautiful iPad tablet apps that ran natively.

How did they do in that department? 1wink.gif
post #52 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post


LOL... that was just until developers got on-board with making beautiful iPad tablet apps that ran natively.

Specially coded apps to support retina display iPads? Sounds like fragmentation to me.
Edited by stike vomit - 3/5/13 at 10:22pm
post #53 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

I honestly believe that Google purchased Moto for 2 reasons: 1, to stave off Samsung's meteoric rise in the Android world to some degree, as has been rumored.  And 2, to produce a line of phones (like Nexus) that will partially solve the fragmentation problem.  The Nexus phones are the first to receive Android updates and the line isn't as fragmented as phones produced by other manufacturers.

Having said that, it's going to be very interesting to see how Android plays out over the next few years.  There's no doubt that fragmentation is frustrating for developers.  My money is on Google reining in Android, and Samsung/others either complying or forking the OS like Amazon has already done.  Talk about fragmentation if that happens!
Generally true but the Samsung nexus Canadian telco one doesn't. The telco or Samsung prevents it. Go figure.
post #54 of 74
There are android developers ? I thought all their apps were wallpapers or app killers to try and save their pathetic battery life
post #55 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post

Yes Really to quote rovio themselves in a gigaohm article:

Android fragmentation is a serious issue for developers.
 In its tweets, Rovio Mobile said it began working on the Android version of Angry Birds in the spring. But the company said it took a long time to test for all the different Android devices to ensure they worked well. “Main challenge with Android is the amount of different devices. They are all different. Takes forever to test,” the company said tweeted. In the end, there are still devices like the HTC Hero and Sony Ericsson X10 that appear to have problems running the game. By comparison, porting over Angry Birds to webOS earlier this year only took a “few hours.” This could be a growing problem for Android developers as the number and variety of devices proliferates.



Even rovio tells us that it is a huge pain in the arse to port to android and that there are still android phones that wont or have a difficult time running angry birds.  Android is the problem with its horrible fragmentation.  They also said in the same article that paid game models like on iOS dont work on android because of the mindset of the users.  People want freemium games on android. A game they can download for free and just click the ads out of the way.
Hang on you are using evidence, the ultimate troll KD will simply ignore it or spin it every which way he can.
post #56 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

God dammit I can't stand all the bullshit you post. I've never thought anyone was actually a paid shill until you started posting.
I agree +1000000000000
He sickens me
Please can him immediately
post #57 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post

Specially coded apps to support retina display iPads? Sounds like fragmentation to me.

By "specially coded apps" you mean creating artwork that fits exactly within the iPad's screen parameters? That's really not as oddball as you think.

But don't take my word for it.... look at all the apps made for the "difficult to design for" iPad.

And compare that to the apps made for the "just throw whatever you can onto the screen" Android tablets.

Look... I know what you're saying. But Apple creating a spec and developers following that spec down to the pixel isn't as bad as you're trying to make it.

If you want your apps to look good on a Retina screen... guess what... you're gonna have to build them that way!

That's not fragmentation.

.
Edited by Michael Scrip - 3/6/13 at 2:47am
post #58 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

An article about app development, written by a major in Political Science.  That makes sense.

 

In reality, there's only a handful of major display sizes and device types to target.

 

Same as with iOS, most Android apps work with even a fairly old OS version, since the APIs most apps need were already in there years ago.  

 

Click bait.

 

That's the problem.  You need to target a fairly old OS version to remain compatible with a larger majority of handsets.  54% is still 2.3 or older. 

 

http://developer.android.com/about/dashboards/index.html

post #59 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post

*sigh* Here we go again with the Android bashing. Quelle surprise, AppleInsider.

This article isn't a study; it's speculation. The author isn't investigating why something has happened; she's guessing that something might happen. I have to wonder if the author knows the first thing about software development. It is not a problem to support multiple devices on Android. The platform was designed to support that. You might want to have a look at the documentation on the subject

Some developers are choosing to target only 4.x because they have more customers on it. Just yesterday, 500px announced that the next version of their app will drop Gingerbread support in the next version because so few of their users are on it. Other developers are having this discussion and generally coming to the same conclusion. Ultimately, backwards compatibility is something each developer has to decide for themselves, but the market is clearly moving in the 4.x direction.

...

(Btw, I have to keep making this point every few months. It's almost as if no one on here actually listens or does any fact-checking before they type out an angry anti-Android screed. It's really tedious).
 

 

Ignoring for the moment that the plural of anecdotal isn't data, what it shows more is that a large portion of Android devices are not being used as smartphones which is why some app developers are seeing a majority of 4.x sales despite a majority of the market running an OS older than ICS. 

 

Folks are still making new Gingerbread phones in 2013 although typically for the developing market.

 

http://www.hardwarezone.com.ph/tech-news-huawei-ascend-y210d-budget-dual-sim-smartphone-now-sells-ph

 

I assume because the hardware requirements are lighter. 

 

Looking on AT&T I see them still selling 2.3 phones:  Samsung Captivate, Exhilarate, Pantech Burst, Pocket.  Heck the Sharp FX Plus is a 2.2 device. 

 

I haven't bothered to look on Verizon but it makes sense that the free phones are the older models and gingerbread the majority.

 

The documentation on the subject still show more than half of android devices are pre-ICS.  That should hopefully change by the time that Key Lime Pie gets released but 2.x will still be a large part of the pie when that happens.

post #60 of 74
Nitpick Police!

"Dr. Mary Ellen Gordon, PhD..."

Unless she's a medical doctor, one does not use titles, much less degrees with a person's name. I have informed the Associated Press style people and this will be noted in your permanent file. 1smile.gif
post #61 of 74

Alright guys, I have just signed up for the sake of replying to this hot topic.

 

First off, let me start by saying that both sides have valid points. However, essentially Android guys do not seem to consider the whole picture. I do say this from a biased perspective as I personally favour iOS devices both for use, as well as for development by far.

 

So here we go:

 

Most commenters above are right in saying that resolution in itself does not matter as much. This one is true both for apps, as well as for games.

Game engines, especially 3D ones are extraordinarily good in scaling independently of resolution. This does not cause any major headaches during development. It gets a bit more important for app development but even there resolutions don't vary as much due to increased pixel density on higher resolution screens. Essentially the resolution might be higher but the pixel density makes up for it. Hence, in both worlds it is extremely convenient to work with density independent pixels. Essentially positioning something at position let's say 30x, 30y will look the same on a Retina and non-Retina device. The same goes for Android.

Optimising for various pixel densities might be annoying but at the end of the day mostly comes down to exporting graphics in different resolutions and that's about it.

This is essentially different from resolutions as we saw them evolve in the PC market over the past, where most displays had 72 dots per inch and difference in resolution equaled the amount of space you'd have on the screen.

 

The real problem with Android when it comes to game development comes down to various different chips being on the market, some supporting all OpenGL ES features, some only a subset, some older versions, etc and you end up tweaking shaders for ages. This is especially a problem with budget phones.

 

It is also correct that Android / Google's APIs and UI components scale very well and technically can support any resolution without causing headaches. And yes, there are nice things such as fragments, which make it easier to show content on varying screen sizes.

 

However, there is something intrinsically important and that is consistency and aspect ratio. You know exactly where you stand with iOS. Retina or non-Retina doesn't matter. You have essentially two screen sizes with two aspect ratios on phones and you got exactly one on tablets. That's the huge deal, I'll get to exactly why a bit below. This is a huge convenience when creating really detailed user experiences and shouldn't be underestimated. Especially consider, that the iPhone 5 is essentially only different in height while maintaining width. You don't get that on Android. Not at all. You got a crapload of various screen sizes and "slightly" varying pixel densities also affect the amount of content rendered on the screen.

 

Thus, while creating apps using only standard components provided by Google or making a huge effort writing your own, extremely scalable ones, makes the app adapt without headaches, it also makes it look up to extremely different over various devices. Nowadays there are also many folks out there that expect an app to be creative and to look different than all others, which requires developers to come up with different UI ideas than tinting the action bar or putting some gradient in it.

 

Also consider that many of the really great apps are designed extremely carefully. Every button, every icon, every element you see on the screen is carefully positioned. There are sometimes hour long debates on moving an element even just a single pixel (or density independent pixel). The same goes for content that is not scrollable and therefore of foreseeable size, carefully designed. So what happens on iOS? Absolutely nothing, you have one factor to consider if you develop for phones and that's the extended height of the iPhone 5. Nothing more. You would either work on the spacing, on background elements or you'd display some additional information on only this one device. That's it.

 

Android on the other hand is a bigger problem. You just can't foresee what kind of device your customers are going to use. There are three inch devices and there are Galaxy notes and everything possible and impossible in between. This causes the app to get stretched, both vertically as well as horizontally. Technically this is not a problem, since the app simply stretches and that's it. However it might look funny, it might look ugly, it might look somewhere in between or it might in extreme cases make your user interface seem sluggish and not well thought through since you didn't optimise the UX for every possible case. This is a huge and major pain in the ass, don't be mistaken. We're not talking about developers being unable to work without hard coded pixel values. We're simply talking about an initially beautifully designed product looking weird on certain devices.

 

Then obviously there is the choice on language and its VM, which in my opinion was a stupid decision, which is also why I believe not even another 10 projects butter will get rid of all UI lag, especially as resolutions increase. You gotta fight with limited heap sizes, gotta write a lot of lines for certain essential things, which makes you feel as if you're reading bytes off a raw socket rather than using an API and you gotta fight with exceptions, even though all you intended to do is test something which either works or crashes, which you expected.

 

The developer tools in itself are a major headache. They're by far not as polished as Apple's. They're not comfortable and they're ugly. Additionally you are being forced to swap devices through multiple cables because testing something on the simulator which takes roughly two minutes to boot up and then offers horrid 0.3 FPS is just a huge pain in the ass. And don't even try telling me about enabling host GPU support, which is experimental and doesn't work with all features. Oh, and especially not with remembering emulator state. Fantastic.

In general there are just a lot of ifs and buts and this and thats. This becomes apparent just reading the documentation, where you'll always find attention this, attention that, warning this doesn't work with xyz, attention in cases such and such, support library here, but then again not fully and so on.

 

The bottom line is: Developing for Android and supporting Android from a customer support perspective takes longer, more effort and is more expensive than it is for iOS. It is also (subjectively) less fun and less rewarding. The whole experience down to developer tools is just not as good and not as polished. You gotta fight with old OS and API versions, certain incompatibilities due to support libraries, you gotta fight or compromise in how interactive your app can be due to old phones without notable hardware, which again makes for a sluggish experience and so on.

 

Will this stop developers from making Android apps? Not if it is worth it for them. Reality is, in many cases it is not and in other cases it is just not worth the effort over just developing the next thing for iOS. Still, there are great apps coming to Android, often however later than their iOS counterpart, except for idealist developers who develop for Android first or only.

 

The thing is, seeing the differences in market share, I am asking myself whether this will ever change and whether the broader development community would make more off Android if it had 100% market share, considering most make significantly less there despite >80% worldwide market share. Another factor to consider naturally is the general experience and smoothness of development for iOS, which makes it the prime platform for your flagship product. You got exclusively capable devices, you got a predictable target platform and you can count on the fact that almost everyone is on the latest OS and has a credit card with one click purchasing registered.

 

So much for my take on the topic. However, please stop this discussion about junior developers not knowing how to code resolution independently. That's not the issue. ;-)


Edited by cynic - 3/6/13 at 12:21pm
post #62 of 74
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post
Do it. I double-dare you.

 

Eh, I'm no fan of vomiting voluntarily. I'll take you up on the offer if I ever get poisoned.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #63 of 74

my ipod touch 1st gen works great still but damn if i can't get anything beyond ios 3.

 

this means that I can no longer run the majority of new apps.

 

fragmentation?

post #64 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrustyMcLovin View Post

my ipod touch 1st gen works great still but damn if i can't get anything beyond ios 3.

this means that I can no longer run the majority of new apps.

fragmentation?

What is it about fragmentation that is so hard to confuse with obsolescing? The iPod Touch came out in 2007. The original iPhone isn't supported either. Now if they came out with a device today that only ran iOS 2.x that would be fragmentation and be inline with the Android market.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #65 of 74
Fragmentation is obvious when you're looking at video playback or streaming applications. These have to address issues of screen resolution, bit depth, decoding, and for some, DRM. If I judge by my experiences with Vulkano, MX Player and a few others, on a Galaxy SII, Nexus 7 and Note II, using stock firmware and Cyanogenmod 10, the problem is actually huge and bound to discourage anyone who is not a serious tinkerer. I'm also suspecting that fragmentation and the impossibility to implement secure DRM is what behind TiVo's delay for its Android support of the Stream.
What's more surprising is that you encounter these issues on more pedestrian apps; for instance Belkin is releasing a beta of its Wemo app for Galaxy SIII only -- and this is an app that does not do anything fancy.
Also, I have seen very few games work consistently across all three Android devices I own. Most of them have some display issue ranging from mild to catastrophic.
Bottom line, I find it very unimpressive. Then again, so was DOS vs. the Macintosh, and we all know what happened.
post #66 of 74
There are more permutations in a game of chess than there are atoms in the universe.
Breaking news! The latest version of android means that it overtakes all possible chess moves.
post #67 of 74

iPhone 4 is still sold on Apple.com yet it doesn't support Siri or the new 3d flyover feature for maps.

 

fragmentation?

post #68 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrustyMcLovin View Post

iPhone 4 is still sold on Apple.com yet it doesn't support Siri or the new 3d flyover feature for maps.

 

fragmentation?

Has absolutely nothing to do with fragmentation but with the simple fact that the phone is not powerful enough (single core chip) for certain features.

 

Also note, that while certain features such as Siri or Maps flyovers are missing, the device runs on the latest system with the latest APIs. Compare this to Android fragmentation again and rethink your argument please. The impact on third party developers of Siri missing or Flyovers missing is zero.

 

Seriously, I'm sure you know what we're all talking about here, don't play stupid. ;-)

post #69 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

Has absolutely nothing to do with fragmentation but with the simple fact that the phone is not powerful enough (single core chip) for certain features.

 

Also note, that while certain features such as Siri or Maps flyovers are missing, the device runs on the latest system with the latest APIs. Compare this to Android fragmentation again and rethink your argument please. The impact on third party developers of Siri missing or Flyovers missing is zero.

 

Seriously, I'm sure you know what we're all talking about here, don't play stupid. ;-)

 

So an Apple product can have multiple hardware revisions over time, some supported on latest OS while others not, can have multiple chip sets, multiple screen sizes, multiple configurations of the dock connector, different cameras, some with external volume controls and some without..

 

And yet there is NO fragmentation issue whatsoever?

post #70 of 74
Originally Posted by CrustyMcLovin View Post
So an Apple product can have multiple hardware revisions over time, some supported on latest OS while others not, can have multiple chip sets, multiple screen sizes, multiple configurations of the dock connector, different cameras, some with external volume controls and some without..

 

And yet there is NO fragmentation issue whatsoever?

 

You're claiming there's fragmentation in the MacBook Pro line because some of them were made in 2006 while others were made in 2013?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #71 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrustyMcLovin View Post

 

So an Apple product can have multiple hardware revisions over time, some supported on latest OS while others not, can have multiple chip sets, multiple screen sizes, multiple configurations of the dock connector, different cameras, some with external volume controls and some without..

 

And yet there is NO fragmentation issue whatsoever?

 

The RDFs here are all turned up to 11...

post #72 of 74
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post
The RDFs here are all turned up to 11...

 

No, really, explain how anything he's saying is 'fragmentation'.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #73 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrustyMcLovin View Post

 

So an Apple product can have multiple hardware revisions over time, some supported on latest OS while others not, can have multiple chip sets, multiple screen sizes, multiple configurations of the dock connector, different cameras, some with external volume controls and some without..

 

And yet there is NO fragmentation issue whatsoever?

 

 

Crusty, no that's not what I am saying. Obviously you will have old devices, such as currently iPhone 1st and 2nd generation, as well as iPad first generation which do not support the latest iOS. However, that's something unavoidable and happens over time in any market. No one complains about this regarding Android either. People are just trying to twist the argument into this direction in order to supposedly find some fragmentation in the iOS market where there is really not. Also consider that Apple actually tries everything in its power not to produce fragmentation. Chipsets and screen sizes do not matter, because Apple ensured that their chipsets are compatible. And features, such as black bars (letterbox) mode for unadjusted apps, which was often laughed at by Android users is there to ensure that apps designed for certain screen sizes do not get distorted. You might find this stupid, devs appreciate it.

 

I also recommend my long post above, where I explain some of the frustrations with Android from a development perspective. You will realise that in the iOS world it simply doesn't matter what camera the phone has, what chipset it has or what screen density it has. There is no such case as there is with Android where different chipsets lead to rendering problems because of partial OpenGL ES support, despite stating full support and so on. That's the real headache.

 

Despite, you argue about fragmentation because of five years of incremental updates and evolution to one device series (with very little to no compatibility impact) and completely ignore how this is different from current generation devices, released today shipping in hundreds of different models, myriads of shapes and forms and with OS versions older than three years.

 

Sorry, but the latter is clearly different from the iPhone 5 camera having a higher resolution than the iPhone 4 camera or a different SoC, which both have no impact on development.

post #74 of 74

Just curious who here has actually tried developing an Android app?  Because if you're just making a strait Java app, it's pretty damn easy to accommodate different resolutions and such...  

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