or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › Apple updates education only 21.5" iMac model, bumps price to $1,099
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple updates education only 21.5" iMac model, bumps price to $1,099

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
In an update to its traditional special priced Mac offerings targeted at educational institutions, Apple is now offering the newly redesigned 21.5-inch iMac with a 3.3GHz dual-core Intel i3 processor, 4GB of RAM and a 500GB HDD for $1,099.

Education iMac


Compared to Apple's previous iMac for education, which featured a 3.1GHz dual-core i3 CPU, 2GB of RAM and a 250GB HDD, the new thin-and-light model is $100 more expensive but comes with more RAM and storage space. However, the new 21.5-inch iMac uses Intel's HD 4000 integrated graphics chipset, whereas the older version came with a discrete AMD Radeon HD 6750M graphics card.

Like the consumer iMac, the made for education iteration brings Thunderbolt, USB 3.0 and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity while dropping FireWire support. Also of note is the lack of an optical drive, which is a necessity for many schools that regularly install and update software. Interestingly, the standalone drive cannot be added to the configuration upon checkout.

As noted by MacRumors, the education only iMac is available to ship in 5-7 days, which is a bit longer than the 3-5 days quoted for machines with regular specifications. Apple recently caught up with iMac demand after suffering supply constraints during the holiday quarter, with North American customers now seeing 24-hour ship-by times for preconfigured models.
post #2 of 30
"Also of note is the lack of an optical drive, which is a necessity for many schools that regularly install and update software." What software are you talking about? Old software or copies of software that's being distributed illegally? Most software for Macs is available through the App Store or from other on-line distribution methods. Schools need to regulate what software is installed and how the computers are used so removing the optical drive should maintain cleaner systems. If they want to install software, then use a master iMac with optical drive and do remote installations. Schools are able to join the 21st century and don't have to continue to operate like old-time PCs.
post #3 of 30
Yeah, I think its inane when people point out "no media drive". Whatevs, this is 2013 %u2014 not 2002!
post #4 of 30

Why would a school be installing software via CD?  There are very few titles out there that couldn't be easily deployed via network installs.  Apple Remote Desktop is a powerful tool for that purpose.

 

On the off chance that you absolutely MUST have a CD drive with the machine, the school can buy a handful of drives that the techs can connect to USB ports for the installs.

 

Removing the CD drive from the machines is going to save a ton in repair costs.  Kids tend to stick anything into the CD slot, destroying the drive in the process.  No slot, less chance of damage.

post #5 of 30

Any software that doesn't have a digital download method at this point doesn't even deserve to be used or purchased. I can't even think of the last software I used that came only on CDs. 

post #6 of 30
The above comments come from three parents, no doubt.
post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elian Gonzalez View Post

The above comments come from three parents, no doubt.

Why would parents not see the need for an ODD in 2013 but non-parents would? 1confused.gif

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Why would parents not see the need for an ODD in 2013 but non-parents would? 1confused.gif

Its a joke that parents don't really have a damn clue what teachers/education system do/need.  Speaking as the spouse of a teacher, I can pretty much confirm that stereotype.

 

Also working at a university I can tell you that (some/many?) big organisations do in fact need optical drives for software, which might be stupid, lame, so last year, whatever, but its plain simple fact.

post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

Also working at a university I can tell you that (some/many?) big organisations do in fact need optical drives for software, which might be stupid, lame, so last year, whatever, but its plain simple fact.

In what way do they need an ODD? Because they sent on a CD/DVD and therefore can loaded onto the network and installed as needed, or they need to run from the image which means they can copied to as a DMG with Disk Utility?

If an app absolutely needs to read from an ISO, for whatever reason, anyone who manages Macs should know how to use hdiutil to convert a DMG to an ISO.

So what am I missing that some claim that every Mac will need to have a CD/DVD player for thereby deemed completely useless?

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by unother View Post

Yeah, I think its inane when people point out "no media drive". 

 

Where's my floppy? I want to install Lemonade Stand on my iMac.

post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

In what way do they need an ODD? Because they sent on a CD/DVD and therefore can loaded onto the network and installed as needed, or they need to run from the image which means they can copied to as a DMG with Disk Utility?

If an app absolutely needs to read from an ISO, for whatever reason, anyone who manages Macs should know how to use hdiutil to convert a DMG to an ISO.

So what am I missing that some claim that every Mac will need to have a CD/DVD player for thereby deemed completely useless?

I don't work in IT, but when I want software it generally comes to my desk as a DVD. There are all sorts of non-tech reasons this could be, such as payment. Or it could be old software. Maybe it's just the specialized stuff I use. (Though it can't be because I use Ms Office and camtasia, among other things)

And I'm not defending whatever reasons they give me, only suggesting that some organisations need their employees to have ODDs, even if if they technically shouldn't. But changing how 2000 people get software takes some work I'm sure.

ps I don't see why they couldn't use air drives for installation. So I'm not really against the lack of disk drives
post #12 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by JollyPaul View Post

Where's my floppy? I want to install Lemonade Stand on my iMac.


Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

I don't work in IT, but when I want software it generally comes to my desk as a DVD. There are all sorts of non-tech reasons this could be, such as payment. Or it could be old software. Maybe it's just the specialized stuff I use. (Though it can't be because I use Ms Office and camtasia, among other things)

And I'm not defending whatever reasons they give me, only suggesting that some organisations need their employees to have ODDs, even if if they technically shouldn't. But changing how 2000 people get software takes some work I'm sure.

If they need ODDs for some software then my previous comments stand. If there is some reason why every student needs to have an ODD and the content can't be loaded on a drive as a DMG or some other method that have existed for 2 decades, then that isn't likely something that will be an issue as I can't imagine any functioning school using old software, that can't be loaded on a machine, that would also need to buy all new Macs for students.

WE're not just talking about the on-time installation of the SW when people say you have to have an ODD on a machine at all times, you're talking about the constant use of the ODD, otherwise an external to load and install the SW would be more than adequate, which also means someone in IT creating an image of the disc and then installing it remotely.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #13 of 30
I know this is education only- but this is more than enough computer for the majority of desktop users.

2014 27" Retina iMac i5, 2012 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air 2, iPad Mini Retina, iPhone 6, iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

Reply

2014 27" Retina iMac i5, 2012 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air 2, iPad Mini Retina, iPhone 6, iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

Reply
post #14 of 30
It is odd that this article does not include a table that compares the specs of the education vs. consumer models.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Any software that doesn't have a digital download method at this point doesn't even deserve to be used or purchased. I can't even think of the last software I used that came only on CDs. 

 

I hear the CD-ROM market is poised to take off. Every PC will have one by 1995. Once again, the Mac is being left behind. /s

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #16 of 30
Dual core i3? 4 GB RAM? Still not under $1000?

Pathetic.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkyard Dawg View Post

Dual core i3? 4 GB RAM? Still not under $1000?

Pathetic.

 

I'm sorry, but are you blind? Those things you mentioned are more than enough for what's needed. But then you have that amazing beautiful screen, that amazing design and build quality... There's nothing out there that's a better deal.

 

Unless you think plastic boxes for the sole purpose of playing COD are a better investment. This is for colleges... It needs to be reliable, look great, have a better OS, you know... And please, don't talk about "powerful". Just because you write "exit" on the command line to exit the program when you accidentally open it, instead of using the red button (windows), doesn't mean you are badass.

 

There's not a better desktop for the same price, unless you are talking about toys. This is for work.

post #18 of 30
I must say, this is a missed and very good PR opportunity on Apple's part.

They should be offering an i5/8gb RAM with a small(er) Fusion drive for $999.00 to education markets. This is and would be a more than capable computer for 5-6 years, and Apple would gain and retain the "eyeballs" of their future market.

Think of the lost margins today, as an investment for the future. 1cool.gif

Disclaimer: I am thoroughly and with my whole being against "cheap" anything from Apple... especially a cheap iPhone! 1devil.gif
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

I must say, this is a missed and very good PR opportunity on Apple's part.

They should be offering an i5/8gb RAM with a small(er) Fusion drive for $999.00 to education markets. This is and would be a more than capable computer for 5-6 years, and Apple would gain and retain the "eyeballs" of their future market.

Think of the lost margins today, as an investment for the future. 1cool.gif

Disclaimer: I am thoroughly and with my whole being against "cheap" anything from Apple... especially a cheap iPhone! 1devil.gif

Are you missing something like:

 

-they can't make enough of them for their costumers;

-they are crazy expensive/complicated to build, at least for now.

 

the interior is unnecessary. for education, an i3 is plenty, 4gb ram is plenty (most likely it will run 1 or 2 programs at time, 500gb is plenty (they are all connected) and what sets them apart from crappy PCs is the OS, build quality, beauty, reliability, etc.

 

I don't expect the average joe that just wants a COD machine to understand that... but c'mon.

post #20 of 30
Funny to see everyone attacking the comment about schools needing an ODD. I'm with them. I work closely with Schools ICT Support and Service Development. Shame the author is out-of-touch... or the schools he/she knows are out-of-touch.
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

Disclaimer: I am thoroughly and with my whole being against "cheap" anything from Apple... especially a cheap iPhone! 1devil.gif

post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by unother View Post

Yeah, I think its inane when people point out "no media drive". Whatevs, this is 2013 %u2014 not 2002!

 

 

Say what you will, but many companies and educations still use optical drives. I use an optical drive as well.  I use the drives to put CDs on the Mac. I also use it to watch DVDs (and yes occasionally record). 

 

There is a difference between being able to do things without an optical drive, and selling your budget conscious educational customers on the idea of buying a computer that costs more but does less. Many libraries, including those on school campuses, have tons of media on DVD and CD. I just needed some software for work the other day (for a PC), and the company sent it on a CD. 

 

The point isn't whether a lot of these things can be done in a different fashion or if the new ways are even better in some regard, it is whether your customer wants to do it in a different fashion. I for one think Apple lost its way on the new iMac design. Johnny Ive once said design is about picking two or three key functionalities for a product and creating a great product to accomplish those things. Apple 1) stripped the optical drive, and 2) made the device really thin. Yet, on a desktop computer is weight and thinness really a primary functionality that needs to be achieved? I would say no. My iMac faces a wall and never moves. Apple stripped the optical drive to make the product thinner, but it really doesn't make the product better. Further, it is a lot harder to work on the new iMac to repair it yourself, a thing many desktop users ar interested in doing. 

post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ontheinside View Post

Funny to see everyone attacking the comment about schools needing an ODD. I'm with them. I work closely with Schools ICT Support and Service Development. Shame the author is out-of-touch... or the schools he/she knows are out-of-touch.

 

 

Perhaps, you are in a district that actually has funding and/or people who care to do things differently. Again, the issue isn't one of "needing." Of course, schools don't need an optical drive. The issue is do they want one, and do they want to pay more for a machine that lacks one. 

post #24 of 30
Schools don't want wireless mice and keyboards. Batteries are one issue, walking is another. In no way is a USB cable any form of security, but psychologically it makes a difference. Good to see the SD card in and BT back as standard. There is still some CD/DVD distribution of software, but almost everything we use is available on the network. Oddly there are still some disc-based licenses that say the software cannot be accessed on a network. It would be nice to burn DVDs for distribution of student work, but that's why there are external superdrives.

Anyone know if there are any surprises with going Thunderbolt > FW800 > FW400? There are still some image capture boxes, hard drives and some of the last living Mini-DV cams that still get used regularly.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

 

 

Say what you will, but many companies and educations still use optical drives. I use an optical drive as well.  I use the drives to put CDs on the Mac. I also use it to watch DVDs (and yes occasionally record). 

 

There is a difference between being able to do things without an optical drive, and selling your budget conscious educational customers on the idea of buying a computer that costs more but does less. Many libraries, including those on school campuses, have tons of media on DVD and CD. I just needed some software for work the other day (for a PC), and the company sent it on a CD. 

 

The point isn't whether a lot of these things can be done in a different fashion or if the new ways are even better in some regard, it is whether your customer wants to do it in a different fashion. I for one think Apple lost its way on the new iMac design. Johnny Ive once said design is about picking two or three key functionalities for a product and creating a great product to accomplish those things. Apple 1) stripped the optical drive, and 2) made the device really thin. Yet, on a desktop computer is weight and thinness really a primary functionality that needs to be achieved? I would say no. My iMac faces a wall and never moves. Apple stripped the optical drive to make the product thinner, but it really doesn't make the product better. Further, it is a lot harder to work on the new iMac to repair it yourself, a thing many desktop users ar interested in doing. 

The new iMacs also use a slower, laptop-sized hard drive (spinning at 5400 rpm), and have integrated graphics only (on the 21" model). Pretty disappointing to go backwards just for thinness. The new screen is great, though - much less glare. Speaking of glare, all these same people saying everyone should stop complaining about the lack of an optical drive are the same people who said to stop complaining about glossy screens. Well guess what? Glossy is out.

 

I make DVDs, and yes, people still want them, for many reasons.

post #26 of 30

Hmm... are you better off with a 3.3 GHz dual-core i3 or a 2.7 GHz quad i5?

 

The 2.7 GHz quad i5 in the non-edu, normal iMac turbos to only 3.2 GHz. It's got more L3, so single core performance be may half a speed grade faster than a Core i3 w/3MB cache or however much it has. In some, maybe even many a Core i3 might perform better. If it wasn't for the turbo, it'll be a no brainer, go for the i3 for 90% of the people out there.

post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

Are you missing something like:

-they can't make enough of them for their costumers;
-they are crazy expensive/complicated to build, at least for now.

the interior is unnecessary. for education, an i3 is plenty, 4gb ram is plenty (most likely it will run 1 or 2 programs at time, 500gb is plenty (they are all connected) and what sets them apart from crappy PCs is the OS, build quality, beauty, reliability, etc.

I don't expect the average joe that just wants a COD machine to understand that... but c'mon.

I'm not missing anything really... your points are all valid... EXCEPT

1) the still unrelenting and false perception of ROI/cost-to-spec on Apple devices. At this point why even fight it anymore? We all know that a half-speced iOS or OS X device is just as fast and more usable than a double-speced Android or WinBox. But the admins and IT just refuse to believe it.

Soooo... for the education market only and seeing to it that Johnny and Sally get the VERY best elegant computer in their classrooms, Apple decides that the PR AND future customer value is worth the margin-cut today.

2) in higher grades, you may be installing Adobe or MS suites, or video, 3D, CAD, music production software. 4gb RAM is cutting it too close, and ALL Macs should have OS X and Apps on an SSD and/or Fusion drive. Future-proofed it.... to make it an even MORE value-added proposition and ROI.

* Apple's production woes does not even need to be considered AFAIC. Backlogs are positive business. Many a PC vender would LOVE to know what that even means or looks like these days.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post


Regardless of whether you come back and see this, but what exactly about those iPods is cheap?

And to tell ya the truth: Yeah. I'm against 'em. One-trick-pony unnecessary gadget these days.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #29 of 30
I saw this and was not impressed. If I was an educational institution, I would at minimum go for the upper 21.5" with the 650M.
post #30 of 30

I know that many schools are cramped and crowded. I think a 17 inch model for education would be a better choice. But of course Apple doesn't made one anymore. I see a lot of schools passing on this product.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Current Mac Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › Apple updates education only 21.5" iMac model, bumps price to $1,099