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Researchers bypass Android encryption by exposing phones to freezing temperatures - Page 2

post #41 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Cold temps can do wonders for a harddrive.

 

A few years ago, the drive on a Macbook that I had suddenly died. It sounded like it had the click of death, because all it would do is make these nasty, loud clicking sounds every once in a while. The drive was totally done with. It wouldn't boot up at all and no data could be accessed from it.

 

After some quick online research, I decided to put the drive in a ziplock bag, and I threw it in the freezer overnight. The next day I removed it from the freezer and I immediately hooked it up to a Mac, and I was able to retrieve most of the data that was on the drive. It worked for almost an hour, then it died again, and remained dead for good.

They were able to something like this with Walt Disney's brain and extracted the story lines for two new animated movies and learned the real relationship between Donald Duck and his nephews.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Cold temps can do wonders for a harddrive.

 

A few years ago, the drive on a Macbook that I had suddenly died. It sounded like it had the click of death, because all it would do is make these nasty, loud clicking sounds every once in a while. The drive was totally done with. It wouldn't boot up at all and no data could be accessed from it.

 

After some quick online research, I decided to put the drive in a ziplock bag, and I threw it in the freezer overnight. The next day I removed it from the freezer and I immediately hooked it up to a Mac, and I was able to retrieve most of the data that was on the drive. It worked for almost an hour, then it died again, and remained dead for good.

They were able to something like this with Walt Disney's brain and extracted the story lines for two new animated movies and learned the real relationship between Donald Duck and his nephews.

 

But what is Goofy?

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

But what is Goofy?


I would say the whole scenario sounds pretty goofy...

post #44 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by thataveragejoe View Post

Regardless of device or type, if you can physically alter it, odds are you can get to the data eventually.

The whole point of encrypting the drive is that, in the unfortunate case where a malicious party gets physical access, it would still be very difficult to access the data.

This is a case where a security feature does not fulfill its promise.
post #45 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Now, that's a really strange one. Not only the fact that the bug exists, but the fact that someone was able to find it.

Not that strange.

 

This form of attack has been demonstrated as early as 2008 (http://forums.overclockers.com.au/showthread.php?t=655809) as a method to freeze the RAM of a laptop to uncover the whole disk encryption key in memory.   A couple cans of liquid Air was enough to freeze the DRAM and capture the entered (at last boot) the key from memory (accessing the RAM as a raw data device).

post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You'd think something called Ice Cream Sandwich could withstand freezing temperatures.



PS: Beat you to it, GTR. 1biggrin.gif
Beat me to it also, maybe they needed a better name scheme.
post #47 of 52
Isn't easier to point a gun to the person and ask the password?
post #48 of 52

They could manufacture the phone to explode below a threshold temperature. Canadians would have to buy phone muffs to keep from blowing their hands off.

post #49 of 52
Why bother with the cooler - just wait for it to freeze on its own... (rimshot)
post #50 of 52

Of course, the freezing RAM method would work on any device... including iPhones.

 

OTOH, perhaps Apple has anti-freeze protection already built in by accident: 

 

 

 

j/k  :)

post #51 of 52

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/21/13 at 4:29pm
post #52 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Of course, the freezing RAM method would work on any device... including iPhones.

OTOH, perhaps Apple has anti-freeze protection already built in by accident: 





j/k  1smile.gif
Vs windows when the device never works again.
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