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Apple marketing chief uses rare Twitter post to take shot at Android security issues

post #1 of 71
Thread Starter 
Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller made a rare appearance on Twitter on Thursday to ding the security situation on Google's Android mobile operating system, linking to a report showing that Android malware threats are on the rise.

Schiller be Shilled Space Ghost


Schiller took to Twitter on Thursday for just the 172nd time since opening his account in 2008, linking to F-Secure's Mobile Threat Report Q4 2012. Aside from providing the link, Schiller said only "Be safe out there."

The report looks at the risks for the assorted mobile platforms in the fourth quarter of last year, finding that 96 new families and variants of malware were discovered in the fourth quarter alone. Of these 21 threats were based on PremiumSMS, which sends out SMS messages to premium rate numbers or signs victims up to SMS-based subscription services.

charty


Others operate through banking trojans, stealing users' mobile Transaction Authentication Numbers in order to transfer money from their accounts without their knowledge. One such malware, known as Eurograbber, took $47 million from over 30,000 retail and corporate accounts in Europe. That version, though, first installed itself on users' computers before tricking them into loading it onto their mobile devices.

charty art


The report attributes the rise in Android malware to the OS' increasing market share. The most recent market analyses peg Android at 70 percent of the global smartphone market. That leap in market share corresponds strongly with an increase in malware for the platform. Android malware now accounts for 79 percent of the 301 total families and variants discussed in the report. Similarly, the decline in market share of Nokia's Symbian platform has coincided with a drop in the number of new malware variants discovered for it.

Apple's iOS, despite accounting for 22 percent of all smartphones shipped worldwide, is apparently nowhere near as vulnerable as Android. While it is vulnerable to the occasional multiplatform threat, iOS-targeted threats accounted for only 0.7 percent of 2012 malware threats. The report found only two profit-motivated threats to the iOS platform in 2012, just one more than either BlackBerry or Windows Mobile.
post #2 of 71

This is the real Phil Schiller this time, right? 

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #3 of 71
Let's see the Fandroids try to spin this news.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #4 of 71
Android is winning!!!
post #5 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Let's see the Fandroids try to spin this news.

Isn't it obvious? There's more software for Android. /s
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #6 of 71

Wow, look at Android compared to everybody else!lol.gif

 

Holy cow!1smoking.gif

 

Android is out of control! It's off the charts! 1biggrin.gif

 

I would never touch an Android device for the obvious reasons, such as poor OS, lag, terrible eco system, poor app selection, fragmentation, cheap hardware and all of the other usual reasons that everybody knows about, but these dangerous security flaws and threats just adds a whole new dimension as to why Android sucks so badly.

 

Android is the perfect phone for somebody who lives in emerging third world markets and has no bank account, no credit card and nothing of value at all to lose, so why would they care?

 

Anybody else who values their security and has more than $5 to their name would be smart to stay as far away from Android as possible.

post #7 of 71

Just looking at one year doesn't tell the whole truth and is something Apple haters can't dispute. Here's the chart from f-secure's 2011 report showing trends from several years. iOS malware is virtually nonexistent.

 

 

post #8 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Let's see the Fandroids try to spin this news.

 

Same way they spin the "no viruses on a mac" as a negative. 

 

"Smart people know how to protect themselves from spyware/malicious software/etc, so Macs are for stupids" or some other such horse-shit. In their deranged world, people actually want to install antivirus protection, etc on their phones. 

post #9 of 71
So I guess the Windows vs. Mac analogy does apply to Android vs. iOS.
post #10 of 71
lol nice.
post #11 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

 link to F-Secure's Mobile Threat Report Q4 2012

The actual report is a very in depth document. Worth the read.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #12 of 71
Ah the joys of an 'open' platform 1smile.gif

Android users deserve to have their bank accounts raped.
Do homeless people even have bank accounts?
post #13 of 71
Damn, go Phil. I'm liking the "new" Apple.
post #14 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Android users deserve to have their bank accounts raped.

 

They do indeed.

 

I don't know about Android users, but I value my info, and there is no way that I would put all of my personal info at risk just to save a buck or two. I'm talking about various bank account info, credit card info, trading firm info, email info, online retail info, various passwords etc............And somebody expects me to put all of that on an Android device, that is about as secure as a safe made out of cardboard? lol.gif

 

I just completed a bank transfer earlier today on my iPad. No way in hell would I have ever done that on any Android device.

post #15 of 71

This out earlier in the week - IT security experts are leaving Android for iPhone because of security concerns. Firmware updates for Android phones can come six months later if you buy your Android from a carrier. 

post #16 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

This is the real Phil Schiller this time, right? 

Who else but the real Schiller would claim that "Android malware threats are no the rise"?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #17 of 71

nice spin, appleinsider... perhaps "Apple marketing chief uses rare Twitter post to highlight iOS security strength."

post #18 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

Damn, go Phil. I'm liking the "new" Apple.

Let's hope that this is the start of a new approach to managing public relations from Apple.

I love it. More, Phil, more!!
post #19 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


Who else but the real Schiller would claim that "Android malware threats are no the rise"?


that wasn't Schiller. that was Kevin Bostic...

post #20 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple  View Post

 

They do indeed.

 

I don't know about Android users, but I value my info, and there is no way that I would put all of my personal info at risk just to save a buck or two. I'm talking about various bank account info, credit card info, trading firm info, email info, online retail info, various passwords etc............And somebody expects me to put all of that on an Android device, that is about as secure as a safe made out of cardboard? lol.gif

 

I just completed a bank transfer earlier today on my iPad. No way in hell would I have ever done that on any Android device.

I complete various banking transactions on a weekly basis on my Nexus 4, and have not had an issue to date (I've been using Android for a few years now). 

All this report really says to me is what anyone using ANY platform should already know, which is to be smart about what you install on your phone. 

No device is 100% secure, as most times, the user tends to be the weak link. Let's not forget this incident too quickly...
 

post #21 of 71
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

Let's not forget this incident too quickly...

 

You could at least read the link. My stars.


Goatse's probe into the iPad 3G security hole suggests that the blame lies with AT&T
the web security group that exploited vulnerabilities on the AT&T network

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #22 of 71

Isn't Phil Schiller sounding like, he is actually welcoming hackers to iOS?

post #23 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chandra69 View Post

Isn't Phil Schiller sounding like, he is actually welcoming hackers to iOS?

If so that would be a good strategy. Let them try. If there are vulnerabilities, use them to get in front of it.
post #24 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

No device is 100% secure, as most times, the user tends to be the weak link. 

 

You're right that no device is 100% secure, and nobody should take security for granted, including people who use iOS.

 

However, what that chart clearly tells me is that Android is vastly less secure than everything else that is out there, and that is certainly something to consider for people who are choosing a mobile platform.

post #25 of 71

Originally Posted by Apple ][

They do indeed.I don't know about Android users, but I value my info, and there is no way that I would put all of my personal info at risk just to save a buck or two. I'm talking about various bank account info, credit card info, trading firm info, email info, online retail info, various passwords etc............And somebody expects me to put all of that on an Android device, that is about as secure as a safe made out of cardboard? lol.gif

 

I just completed a bank transfer earlier today on my iPad. No way in hell would I have ever done that on any Android device.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------

And yet, the only time my accounts have been hacked was thanks to Apple's lame approach to security via iTunes and customer service line. Those idiots would give anyone calling all the access to an account they wanted. Awesome Apple. /s And I have completed thousands of transactions from various bank accounts via my Nexus 7 and S3. Guess what? Never an issue. Maybe because I use apps from the banks and not the web, like most Android users.
post #26 of 71

What's dumb is the media doesn't latch on to this and crucify Android over this. If it was Apple, we wouldn't hear the end of it.  But Android?  They probably expect all of this malware, so it isn't newsworthy.

post #27 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chandra69 View Post

Isn't Phil Schiller sounding like, he is actually welcoming hackers to iOS?

Bring it on.

 

In the old days, Windows fanboys would claim that there weren't that many Macs out there, so that's why there were hardly any viruses or malware for it, because the hackers couldn't be bothered they claimed. I'm glad that I don't have to run any virus apps on my Macs, working in the background and using up CPU power.

 

But now, with so many iOS devices out there, that same argument doesn't hold any water. If hackers and criminals wish to target iOS, they will, or at least they can try. How successful they'll be is another matter, as Apple has been pretty much on top of things lately, and security holes have been patched up very quickly.

 

Android just seems like a complete mess and a haven for criminals. 

post #28 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chandra69 View Post

Isn't Phil Schiller sounding like, he is actually welcoming hackers to iOS?

No, he's just putting the information link and telling people to be safe.  He wasn't slamming anyone, he's letting the information speak for itself.

post #29 of 71
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post
Bring it on.

 

In the old days, Windows fanboys would claim that there weren't that many Macs out there, so that's why there were hardly any viruses or malware for it, because the hackers couldn't be bothered they claimed. I'm glad that I don't have to run any virus apps on my Macs, working in the background and using up CPU power.

 

But now, with so many iOS devices out there, that same argument doesn't hold any water. If hackers and criminals wish to target iOS, they will, or at least they can try. How successful they'll be is another matter, as Apple has been pretty much on top of things lately, and security holes have been patched up very quickly.

 

Android just seems like a complete mess and a haven for criminals. 

 

iOS has had viruses already. Every OS has. Difference between iOS and Android. When I download an app, I get to see the permissions it is requesting and I can deny them. You put all your faith in Apple and if they screwed up, "Oh well. Sucks for you." Apple treats you like your kids. You enjoy being dominated. You welcome it.

post #30 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple  View Post

 

You're right that no device is 100% secure, and nobody should take security for granted, including people who use iOS.

 

However, what that chart clearly tells me is that Android is vastly less secure than everything else that is out there, and that is certainly something to consider for people who are choosing a mobile platform.

I can't say I disagree. I just can't help but laugh at the overall tone of some of the posts here, but it seems that at least some people here are open to conversation, without completely ignoring common sense.

post #31 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Let's see the Fandroids try to spin this news.

I posted a link to the F-Secure study n the thresd about freezing Android and it was already spun: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/156354/researchers-bypass-android-encryption-by-exposing-phones-to-freezing-temperatures#post_2289656

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #32 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

Let's not forget this incident too quickly...

 

The iPads were not compromised. AT&T's server was the hacked and IMEIs and email address were stolen from AT&T. It had nothing to do with malware on the device.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #33 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by xuselppa View Post

 

You put all your faith in Apple and if they screwed up, "Oh well. Sucks for you." 

 

I certainly do. I've been putting my faith in Apple for decades now, and never once have they screwed me over. I've owned countless Apple hardware throughout the years.

 

Now why in the world would I choose something else, from somebody else that I certainly do not trust? Apple has earned my trust. And it's not just my trust that they have earned, as Apple has the most satisfied customers on the planet.

post #34 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

The iPads were not compromised. AT&T's server was the hacked and IMEIs and email address were stolen from AT&T. It had nothing to do with malware on the device.

How dare you bring facts into the argument¡

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #35 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

I can't say I disagree. I just can't help but laugh at the overall tone of some of the posts here, but it seems that at least some people here are open to conversation, without completely ignoring common sense.

So you're saying that I'm open to conversation and that I don't completely ignore common sense? 

 

I see that you're new here, but I'm asking because some people regularly accuse me of the exact opposite around here. Just yesterday, as a matter of fact.lol.gif

post #36 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple  View Post

 

I certainly do. I've been putting my faith in Apple for decades now, and never once have they screwed me over. I've owned countless Apple hardware throughout the years.

 

Now why in the world would I choose something else, from somebody else that I certainly do not trust? Apple has earned my trust. And it's not just my trust that they have earned, as Apple has the most satisfied customers on the planet.

I could say the same thing about Windows and Android, but his point about listed permissions should not be completely ignored, as it's rather valid.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple  View Post

So you're saying that I'm open to conversation and that I don't completely ignore common sense? 

 

I see that you're new here, but I'm asking because some people regularly accuse me of the exact opposite around here. Just yesterday, as a matter of fact.lol.gif

 

Seems that way, at least the way you replied to my post. But let's give it some time :P
post #37 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

I could say the same thing about Windows and Android, but his point about listed permissions should not be completely ignored, as it's rather valid.

I don't think that his point about listed permissions is completely valid, because it only applies to a tiny minority of users.

 

I see similar arguments being made from time to time, and they're always being made by people who are technically proficient or who claim to be technically proficient. The average user is not. The average user is dumb as crap, and doesn't even know what permissions are. Walk up on the street to some average person using an Android phone, and ask them what permissions are. Most wouldn't have a clue I bet.

 

A good OS needs to protect everybody, not just .7% of users.

post #38 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple  View Post

I don't think that his point about listed permissions is completely valid, because it only applies to a tiny minority of users.

 

I see similar arguments being made from time to time, and they're always being made by people who are technically proficient or who claim to be technically proficient. The average user is not. The average user is dumb as crap, and doesn't even know what permissions are. Walk up on the street to some average person using an Android phone, and ask them what permissions are. Most wouldn't have a clue I bet.

 

A good OS needs to protect everybody, not just .7% of users.

Hence why I cringe when an average person asks me for Admin Rights on a work laptop, so they can install some mundane piece of software. Again, this goes back to my point of stating that users are the weakest link, and they should be educated. If they chose not to educate themselves, or ignore those who try, then I have a hard time feeling sorry for them.

post #39 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

Again, this goes back to my point of stating that users are the weakest link, and they should be educated. 

 

I guess this is where we disagree. Because the average person is looking to buy a phone, not a mainframe that requires a college degree in computer science.

 

The average user is not a pimpled faced 17 year old nerd living in their mom's basement and spending hours rooting their phone.

 

The average user is somebody like a mom or a grandmother, and they are not interested in being "educated" in order to properly and safely use their devices. They just want a phone that works.

post #40 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Same way they spin the "no viruses on a mac" as a negative. 

"Smart people know how to protect themselves from spyware/malicious software/etc, so Macs are for stupids" or some other such horse-shit. In their deranged world, people actually want to install antivirus protection, etc on their phones. 

In much the same way that the GUI wasn't real computing…you had to go to the DOS command line for that, apparently.
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