or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple marketing chief uses rare Twitter post to take shot at Android security issues
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple marketing chief uses rare Twitter post to take shot at Android security issues - Page 2

post #41 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple View Post

 

I guess this is where we disagree. Because the average person is looking to buy a phone, not a mainframe that requires a college degree in computer science.

 

The average user is not a pimpled faced 17 year old nerd living in their mom's basement and spending hours rooting their phone.

 

The average user is somebody like a mom or a grandmother, and they are not interested in being "educated" in order to properly and safely use their devices. They just want a phone that works.

No, we don't really disagree on that point. I'm saying I know exactly what you're talking about, and I see it on a daily basis because of the field of work I'm in. All I'm saying is that it's hard for me to feel sorry for people who screw up, then blame an inanimate object. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JackTheRat View Post


In much the same way that the GUI wasn't real computing…you had to go to the DOS command line for that, apparently.

Wow, when was the last time anyone used that argument? Seems like you're really reaching here.

post #42 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Android users deserve to have their bank accounts raped.
Do homeless people even have bank accounts?

I don't even... what a stupid thing to say.

 

I don't own an Android device, or a Windows device, but I don't wish harm on people that use other platforms. 

post #43 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller made a rare appearance on Twitter on Thursday to ding the security situation on Google's Android mobile operating system, linking to a report showing that Android malware threats are on the rise.

Sounds like a job for Space Ghost or his web-space equivalent Norton.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The report attributes the rise in Android malware to the OS' increasing market share. The most recent market analyses peg Android at 70 percent of the global smartphone market.

Apple's iOS, despite accounting for 22 percent of all smartphones shipped worldwide, is apparently nowhere near as vulnerable as Android.

Marketshare doesn't cover it either because Android is on 600-700 million devices and iOS is on over 500 million. And on top of that, iOS owners browse the web more. Security by obscurity is a redundant argument in this case.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex 
I complete various banking transactions on a weekly basis on my Nexus 4, and have not had an issue to date (I've been using Android for a few years now).

All this report really says to me is what anyone using ANY platform should already know, which is to be smart about what you install on your phone.

The banking example in the article was a pretty sophisticated attack. It infected the PCs first, intercepted banking transactions and asked to verify them via mobile phone. It then sent an SMS with a link called "security update", which infected the phone - a believable SMS as the user requested it. The malware on the PC then made fraudulent transactions, which the infected phone verified without the user knowing.

It's one thing for Mac users to be complacent about security in the face of a handful of threats but it's quite another for Android users to be complacent in light of all the existing malware. The rate of threats also doesn't look like it's slowing down.
post #44 of 71
It's obvious that Apple is desperate!
post #45 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by xuselppa View Post

iOS has had viruses already. Every OS has. Difference between iOS and Android. When I download an app, I get to see the permissions it is requesting and I can deny them. You put all your faith in Apple and if they screwed up, "Oh well. Sucks for you." Apple treats you like your kids. You enjoy being dominated. You welcome it.

I rather put my faith in Apple than in the hundreds of developers on Android.
post #46 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

 

They do indeed.

 

I don't know about Android users, but I value my info, and there is no way that I would put all of my personal info at risk just to save a buck or two. I'm talking about various bank account info, credit card info, trading firm info, email info, online retail info, various passwords etc............And somebody expects me to put all of that on an Android device, that is about as secure as a safe made out of cardboard? lol.gif

 

I just completed a bank transfer earlier today on my iPad. No way in hell would I have ever done that on any Android device.

 

...and had it been done on an Android phone, the PIN number would have been 1234. 

 

As they say, "The difference between stupidity and genius is that there is a limit to genius."

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #47 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

Hence why I cringe when an average person asks me for Admin Rights on a work laptop, so they can install some mundane piece of software. Again, this goes back to my point of stating that users are the weakest link, and they should be educated. If they chose not to educate themselves, or ignore those who try, then I have a hard time feeling sorry for them.

 

I think you may be referring to people being ignorant of social engineered fraud. Even in this day people are still wiring large amounts of cash to Nigeria. 

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #48 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

I think you may be referring to people being ignorant of social engineered fraud. Even in this day people are still wiring large amounts of cash to Nigeria. 

But it was for an inheritance from someone i never met.
post #49 of 71
Wow, Android threatens Apple so much that they have to tweet bad stuff about them? No wonder shares are going down, Apple's resorting to Samsung tactics 1oyvey.gif
post #50 of 71

As always, read these with a pinch of salt.

 

In this report, they included apps that you intentionally install to monitor your phone.  (They didn't call them malware; they listed them as "monitor" apps, but did include them in their overall threat chart.)

 

Otherwise, it looks like none of the trojans came from the Google Play Store.  Can anyone find one from this list like that?

 

They also required the user to turn on "loading from untrusted sources", and engage in risky behavior such as installing an app from a suspicious text, that claims to be a free game and yet wants access to your contacts and SMS.

 

Therefore, as far as I can tell from cross-searching McAfee's files, most affected very few people (in some cases, under 50), and in limited parts of the world, such as Spain or Italy or Southeast Asia.

 

--

 

This is a publicity grab like that other report saying iOS "leaked more info".

 

Doesn't matter what OS the report is supposed to be about, these things are mostly an advertisement from an anti-virus maker, drumming up business.

 

Don't jailbreak or turn on outside sources, exercise common sense, and the threat level is near zero.


Edited by KDarling - 3/8/13 at 5:20am
post #51 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

As always, read these with a pinch of salt.

Otherwise, it looks like none of the trojans came from the Google Play Store.  Can anyone find one from this list like that?

They also required the user to turn on "loading from untrusted sources", and engage in risky behavior such as installing an app from a suspicious text, that claims to be a free game and yet wants access to your contacts and SMS.

Don't jailbreak or turn on outside sources, exercise common sense, and the threat level is near zero.

While I would tend to agree that these articles give the wrong impression of the situation, there are valid issues with the Google / Android model:

http://www.idigitaltimes.com/articles/15826/20130308/android-malware-abounds-even-google-play-store.htm

"According to Brian Krebs, if you go into the deep "underweb" a world of cyercrimals and security attackers, there is a forum he recently came across where an Android malware developer was "actively buying up verified developer accounts at Google Play for $100 apiece".

Unsurprisingly, this particular entrepreneur also sells an Android SMS malware package that targets customers of Citibank, HSBC and ING, as well as 66 other financial institutions in Australia, France, India, Italy, Germany, New Zealand, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey (the complete list is here). The targeted banks offer text messages as a form of multi-factor authentication, and this bot is designed to intercept all incoming SMS messages on infected Android phones."

The banking malware was the one mentioned in the AI article and stole millions from thousands of customers. If it showed up as legit from the Google Play Store, users have no protection. Google would have no choice but to put in stricter measures to filter their store just like Apple.

If it gets to the point where nobody recommends getting 3rd party apps and Google has a strictly curated app store, isn't that just a walled garden with a locked gate?
post #52 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

Wow, when was the last time anyone used that argument? {that 'real computers use command lines'} Seems like you're really reaching here.

Not really. It's the same argument, even though it has been modified.

There have been endless varieties of this argument:

- Real computers use command lines, GUIs are for losers
- Real programmers program in assembly
- Real power users have to be able to tweak every element of their mobile phone
- Real computer users know how to edit the registry.
And so on. And on. And on.

For decades, people have been arguing that a simple, user friendly experience must somehow be the antithesis of powerful computing. They've never been able to justify that position, but it keeps coming back in slightly different forms.

In reality, if there's one thing that computer history teaches, it's that if you want to see the devices that the entire industry will be using tomorrow, look at Apple's products of today.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #53 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Not really. It's the same argument, even though it has been modified.

There have been endless varieties of this argument:

- Real computers use command lines, GUIs are for losers
- Real programmers program in assembly
- Real power users have to be able to tweak every element of their mobile phone
- Real computer users know how to edit the registry.
And so on. And on. And on.

For decades, people have been arguing that a simple, user friendly experience must somehow be the antithesis of powerful computing. They've never been able to justify that position, but it keeps coming back in slightly different forms.

In reality, if there's one thing that computer history teaches, it's that if you want to see the devices that the entire industry will be using tomorrow, look at Apple's products of today.

I cringe at the thought of one of my Average Users modifying the registry. 

But to your last point, I guess it could be said that if you want to see iOS' features of tomorrow, look at Android today.

post #54 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

if you want to see iOS' features of tomorrow, look at Android today.

lol.gif That needs to go on the list. You remember what Android used to look like?

I don't think that malware feature is coming to iOS anytime soon.
post #55 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


lol.gif That needs to go on the list. You remember what Android used to look like?

I don't think that malware feature is coming to iOS anytime soon.

I do. I also remember a time where iOS didn't support MMS, didn't have spell check, didn't have a notification bar, didn't have facebook integration, didn't have turn by turn navigation...and on and on and on!

post #56 of 71
That's why I still enjoy my iPhone4.
post #57 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post

I do. I also remember a time where iOS didn't support MMS, didn't have spell check, didn't have a notification bar, didn't have facebook integration, didn't have turn by turn navigation...and on and on and on!

By all means go on and on and on. Only the notification bar can be justified as having been influenced by Android. Copy/paste was delayed by Apple until they could do it properly so that things like this don't happen:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/feb/22/samsung-copy-paste-problem

By contrast, Android went from a Blackberry rip-off to an iPhone rip-off in its first 2 years on the market:

December 2007:


September 2008 (Android v1, 1.5 years after the iPhone):


Finally in 2009, software keyboard:


Apple adds a drop-down panel and somehow using one puts them behind Android and now Android is the driving force behind all the innovation? This malware problem is just another example of things Google tried to do to mimic Apple but did them in a way that benefitted Google and ended up taking out the quality control that makes Apple products better.
post #58 of 71

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


By all means go on and on and on. Only the notification bar can be justified as having been influenced by Android. Copy/paste was delayed by Apple until they could do it properly so that things like this don't happen:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/feb/22/samsung-copy-paste-problem

By contrast, Android went from a Blackberry rip-off to an iPhone rip-off in its first 2 years on the market:

December 2007:

 
 

By November of 2007 Google had also demoed a touchscreen proof-of-concept Android phone. They weren't just looking at Microsoft or Blackberry-esque designs. There were a few different ones being shown around. It's just the Blackberry one that ever gets mentioned.

 

 
EDIT: Marvin, that's not to be misconstrued as support for NextGenRex. It isn't.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #59 of 71

Copy/Paste issue was caused by TouchWiz, not Android. It's RIGHT THERE in the first sentence! 1bugeye.giflol.gif

post #60 of 71
Originally Posted by 1stGenRex View Post
Copy/Paste issue was caused by TouchWiz, not Android. It's RIGHT THERE in the first sentence!

 

What's your point?

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #61 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

By November of 2007 Google had also demoed a touchscreen proof-of-concept Android phone. They weren't just looking at Microsoft or Blackberry-esque designs. There were a few different ones being shown around. It's just the Blackberry one that ever gets mentioned.

The Blackberry one is mentioned as that's the only one that came before the iPhone so it shows what Google came up with without Apple's influence. Multi-touch concepts that arrived months after the iPhone only showed how far behind they actually were and this was backed up by it taking 2 years to bring the proof of concepts to production. They did make a few better decisions like non-blocking notifications (as did Palm) that Apple eventually adopted and having a notification center but it's crazy to suggest that Android's minor refinements mean Google or Android device manufacturers are now the innovators that Apple has to copy and that they are catching up.

Google's choices for their software development do allow the possibility of getting newer features faster as any manufacturer can develop their own features into the OS but it comes at a price. That price includes Android device manufacturers struggling to differentiate themselves from the crowd and in some cases end up fragmenting the OS. It also includes an increased likelihood of malware. These things need to be acknowledged. Too often it resorts to one company's efforts being the right way and the other being the wrong way. Apple's and Google's choices both have advantages and disadvantages and they both make innovative developments but by far, Apple took the biggest steps forward and that shouldn't be dismissed.

The choices that Apple makes generally also seem to come out on top such as the software keyboard and curated app store that were originally criticised.
post #62 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


The Blackberry one is mentioned as that's the only one that came before the iPhone so it shows what Google came up with without Apple's influence. Multi-touch concepts that arrived months after the iPhone only showed how far behind they actually were and this was backed up by it taking 2 years to bring the proof of concepts to production. They did make a few better decisions like non-blocking notifications (as did Palm) that Apple eventually adopted and having a notification center but it's crazy to suggest that Android's minor refinements mean Google or Android device manufacturers are now the innovators that Apple has to copy and that they are catching up.

Google's choices for their software development do allow the possibility of getting newer features faster as any manufacturer can develop their own features into the OS but it comes at a price. That price includes Android device manufacturers struggling to differentiate themselves from the crowd and in some cases end up fragmenting the OS. It also includes an increased likelihood of malware. These things need to be acknowledged. Too often it resorts to one company's efforts being the right way and the other being the wrong way. Apple's and Google's choices both have advantages and disadvantages and they both make innovative developments but by far, Apple took the biggest steps forward and that shouldn't be dismissed.

The choices that Apple makes generally also seem to come out on top such as the software keyboard and curated app store that were originally criticised.

Marvin, did you look at the video I linked from November of 2007 which predates the Blackberry-like image you offered? I'm guessing not. There's plainly a touchscreen Android phone demoed in it.

 

As for who's innovating and whose imitating, both Apple and Google are very obviously influenced by each other, yet both are developing their own unique features. 


Edited by Gatorguy - 3/8/13 at 11:56am
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #63 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Marvin, did you look at the video I linked from November of 2007 which predates the Blackberry-like image you offered? I'm guessing not. There's plainly a touchscreen Android phone demoed in it.

As for who's innovating and whose imitating, both Apple and Google are very obviously influenced by each other, yet both are developing their own unique features. 

And the iPhone was shown in jan 2007.
post #64 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post


And the iPhone was shown in jan 2007.

I believe you're correct, or at least plenty close enough.

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #65 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Marvin, did you look at the video I linked from November of 2007 which predates the Blackberry-like image you offered? I'm guessing not. There's plainly a touchscreen Android phone demoed in it.

I watched the video and saw the touchscreen Android phone without a software keyboard or pinch zoom but the Blackberry one is based on their original designs from 2006:

http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/25/2974676/this-was-the-original-google-phone-presented-in-2006

Their first touchscreen phone with hardware keyboard was the T-Mobile G1 launched in October 2008:

http://www.theverge.com/2011/12/7/2585779/android-history

The point is just that they clearly had to redesign the whole thing when the iPhone arrived - it wasn't built properly for touch input - and if it hadn't been for Apple, Android phones today would probably still look like Blackberry phones (as would Blackberry phones).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

As for who's innovating and whose imitating, both Apple and Google are very obviously influenced by each other, yet both are developing their own unique features.

The ratio of innovation to imitation isn't the same with both though. There's a strong effort to try and put the two on level ground now that Apple has a notification panel and that's not a fair thing to do.
post #66 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post
The ratio of innovation to imitation isn't the same with both though. There's a strong effort to try and put the two on level ground now that Apple has a notification panel and that's not a fair thing to do.

That's a valid point. Android has "lagged"1wink.gif behind iOS for most of it's existence. It's only been in the past year or so that they could be considered on equal footing, yet separate and unique IMO.

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #67 of 71

iOS apps are leaking more personal info than android apps...

http://www.androidnova.org/ios-apps-leak-more-personal-info-than-android-apps/

post #68 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harsh9 View Post

iOS apps are leaking more personal info than android apps...

http://www.androidnova.org/ios-apps-leak-more-personal-info-than-android-apps/

Yeah we've already seen that one. AI posted it's own article here about it a few days back.

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #69 of 71
I don't Twitter. Is twittering once per ten days rare?
post #70 of 71
Originally Posted by Cletus View Post
I don't Twitter. Is twittering once per ten days rare?

 

Compared to the frequency of public postings (across all mediums) of the other Apple executives, it's ludicrously frequent.

 

Compared to the average "twitterer", it's within the margin of error of never having made a single post.

 

So take that as you will.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #71 of 71

Moved discussion here:

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by hfts View Post

The article was on AI a few days ago, and you commented on it.

Jeeze you have poor memory, or is it a selected one ?

If someone tells me, you have a 78% chance of being hit by the train if you cross at the level crossing that is not controlled by warning lights and a barrier, versus 0.17% if you cross where it is encouraged to (due to warning/barrier etc.), I guess you would not only cross where its dangerous but poke your tongue to mock those who do the correct thing. 

The article didn't claim Android devices had a 78% chance of being infected with malware so you've not offered a valid analogy. When you can come back with a source showing the actual rate of infection then we have something to discuss. X% of some undefined number doesn't tell you a thing about how prevalent malware is.

 

 

For those without the patience to wait for numbers from HFTS, here's some to put things in perspective. According to estimates based on a report from Lookout Security the percentage of US Android devices that will encounter some form of malware in 2013: Less than 1/2 of 1%.. In Japan even less than that. Russia on the other hand comes in at 35%.  Note that even includes relatively benign Adware. 

 

http://thenextweb.com/google/2012/12/13/lookout-predicts-18-4m-android-users-will-be-infected-with-malware-during-2012-and-2013-or-some-1/

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Apple marketing chief uses rare Twitter post to take shot at Android security issues
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple marketing chief uses rare Twitter post to take shot at Android security issues