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Judge orders Apple to hand over documents, prove compliance in privacy lawsuits - Page 2

post #41 of 48
As usual, we have a misleading and inaccurate AI headline.

Apple can't prove that they never violated anyone's privacy any more than I can prove that I didn't kill JFK.

The issue is not one of privacy, at all. The issue is whether Apple has made a good faith effort to comply with the judge's orders.
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Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #42 of 48

"Prove compliance" in the headline refers to complying with the courts' order to produce certain documents in this privacy-related lawsuit. The headline isn't about whether Apple complied with their privacy policy,

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post #43 of 48
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Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

There's even more that that the court has ordered Apple to produce:

 

 

"In Grewal’s order, plaintiffs lawyers also won the right to see Apple documents concerning its process of reviewing applications for its mobile devices. The company redacted the information in part, it said, because the information is “incredibly sensitive and valuable and is a closely guarded trade secret,” according to a court filing.

Phillip Shoemaker, Apple’s Director of App Review, submitted a filing in the case last month explaining how disclosure of the review process would jeopardize Apple and “create real risk” to millions of users of its products, according to the filing."

 

So, what you're pointing out is that Apple takes its users privacy seriously and is trying to protect them as much as possible? Thanks.

 

Unlike Google who will just give your info to anyone who sticks a junk app in their store. Got it.


A more likely motivation for Apple's curious stand is that the company is trying very hard indeed to prevent users from having the possibility to discover exactly how extensively their personal information is being collected and used or propagaged by Apple. This looks more like an attempt to evade privacy responsibility and maintain a curtain of secrecy in a wilful attempt to be able to continue to use the personal information of users without their knowledge or consent.

 

I have pointed out elsewhere that Apples definition of "personal information" is not compliant with internationally accepted legal definitions and is certainly much more limited than the legal definition in the EU and at least 40 Countries worldwide. According to Apple's contrived definition, personal information is only that information which is DIRECTLY associated with natural persons. Since 1980 the OECD has defined personal information to include also information which is INDIRECTLY associated or can be associated with natural persons.

 

This difference in definitions is a self-serving and deceptive use of the terminology which "allows" Apple to use your personal information in any way and for any purpose it sees fit. It is definitely not consumer friendly and it is definitely not compliant with the EU definition.

post #44 of 48
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Originally Posted by Mikeb85 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

How fucking warped must you be to claim that a company that profits from selling agregate data to companies cares more about your privacy than companies that profit from selling tangible products to end users?

Google doesn't sell data, they sell advertising space.  Their algorithms then link ads to users, without ever giving away information.  Again, instead of repeating the erroneous status quo why don't you try to fucking learn something?

For a stupid person you sure post something stupid.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

You're batting for 1,000 today. Google does in fact sell data. I'm simply in awe someone actually claims they don't.
It's possible they do, but do you have some reference for claiming it? I've requested one from several different members and no one has been able to come up with one yet.


Maybe this page gives some insight, but I don't have any knowledge on Google and you seem to have a way better understanding of their business :
http://www.seobook.com/illegal-beagle
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post #45 of 48
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Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


For a stupid person you sure post something stupid.
Maybe this page gives some insight, but I don't have any knowledge on Google and you seem to have a way better understanding of their business :
http://www.seobook.com/illegal-beagle

I'll ignore the silly name-calling. Your link asks a lot of questions, but there's no answers there. Is Google selling BBVA raw search data? Is Google even giving BBVA search data at all? Is Google simply reporting to BBVA a rise or fall in certain keywords from various regions with no search data at all being given to them?  Is BBVA just using this Google service combined with their own data, or is it something more than that? 

http://www.google.com/trends/

 

The article almost sounds like something Microsoft might have come up with. As an aside BBVA announced five days prior to that they were dumping Microsoft office products in favor of Google's office suite. Probably no connection tho.

 

With a company of the size and scope of Google wouldn't there be numerous sources offering proof of the claim that Google sells data, anonymized or not? There's been several members here who mention their association with advertising interests. Surely they would be aware of it. Yet nothing from them either. Google may sell data as I've said more than once. Neither you nor Eric nor anyone else has actually come up with details yet.

 

If it's such common knowledge that, in your opinion, it's "stupid" to question whether it's true wouldn't it be easier to find proof? Does the fact it's not easy say anything to you at all? Perhaps not if it's a claim you want to believe and intend to despite no clear evidence supporting it. 


Edited by Gatorguy - 3/10/13 at 7:49am
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post #46 of 48
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

^ above post



Well, yeah, I agree, if no one knows, then we don't. I would presume if it's true there would be many articles to be found.
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post #47 of 48
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

If it's such common knowledge that, in your opinion, it's "stupid" to question whether it's true wouldn't it be easier to find proof? Does the fact it's not easy say anything to you at all? Perhaps not if it's a claim you want to believe and intend to despite no clear evidence supporting it. 

 

+1

 

Surely between all the ex-Google employees, advertisers who use them, app makers who are on Google Play, and all the quarterly statements and press releases there'd be some sort of proof of them selling personal data, as claimed.  

 

Most of the Google haters simply make alot of false assumptions about what Google does (and MS, Yahoo, and Apple apparently don't), and repeat it so often they believe it to be true. 

post #48 of 48
Exactly Mike. And because there isn't proof, no one knows!
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