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Samsung's Galaxy S4 distracts attention away from Android

post #1 of 90
Thread Starter 
Samsung's Galaxy S 4 launch appeared poised to leverage Android to further distract the public's attention from Apple's iPhone. Instead, the company appears to have created its own apps and services to distract away from Android.

Galaxy S4


Samsung's latest product launch aspired to beat Apple at its own game of theatrical showmanship, sparing no expense to deliver a media blitz following the pattern of Microsoft, HP and, most recently, Sony.

But while it focused attention on being "an Apple," what Samsung didn't say is perhaps the most notable aspect of the event: Samsung made virtually no mention of the Galaxy S 4 being part of Google's Android platform.

It's Android season



Ever since Apple announced plans to stop participating in the January Macworld Expo in 2008, the first part of the year through the spring quarter has been the best time to shine for Apple's competitors in the smartphone industry. Samsung's Galaxy S 4 launch event appears timed to coincide with Apple's historically quiet season for iPhone.

If it seems like all the "Apple is doomed!" rhetoric just randomly showed up out of the blue from 1997, it's only because the world has forgotten that Apple's iPhone shipments have always flattened out in the spring quarter as anticipation of the next model begins to build.

quarterly iPhone sales


This occured so intensely in 2009 that there were actually predictions that Apple would crash and burn back then, even though in retrospect the company has done nothing but hit new records in phone sales ever since.

Google's Nexus One and Palm's webOS both used this nadir of iPhone news in early 2009 to show off a new OS and faster chips. Along with various other Android licensees, these products enjoyed nearly six months of exclusive attention before the launch of the iPhone 3GS that summer.

In 2010, Verizon Wireless launched a "Droid" branded initiative with Motorola to focus attention away from its lack of the iPhone, while Samsung launched its Galaxy brand to closely mimic Apple's iPhone 3GS and its marketing, packaging, accessories and even icons. Android then got six months of virtually exclusive attention until the iPhone 4 launched.

In 2011, a variety of Android licensees launched multicore chips and support for LTE. Google used the "Apple quiet period" to launch Android 3.0 Honeycomb Tablets even as BlackBerry launched its own table failure with the PlayBook.

Early last year, Samsung launched its Galaxy Note phablet, followed by the Galaxy S3. HTC launched two One phones, LG the Optimus 4X HD and G, and Sony the Xperia S and T, along with hundreds of other lessor known Android models. So many companies are clamoring to be heard during the Apple quiet period that, ironically, it's rare for any to really make an impression.

Samsung appears to be doing the best job at standing out among the Android crowd, thanks to a huge advertising budget. But it now appears Samsung wants to stand on its own, independent from Google, having launched the new Galaxy S 4 without making any significant mention of the fact that it uses Android.

New software, but it's not "Android"



While some Android licensees, notably Amazon and its Kindle Fire, have drawn attention to their use of Android, Samsung appears to be distancing itself from Google's platform.

Many observers have noted that Samsung's Galaxy brand already has as much name recognition as Android itself. Samsung, unlike most other Android licensees, has also launched two major initiatives to offer an Android alternative of its own, first with Bada, and most recently with Tizen (a partnership with Intel).

Samsung Hub store


In showing off the new Galaxy S 4, Samsung didn't draw attention to Google's search, mapping or translations services, nor even its ability to download Google Play content. It didn't feature Android apps.

Instead, it featured Samsung's own store (Samsung Hub, pictured above) and exclusive new software, including the previously announced Knox security layer that Samsung has branded as being "SAFE" for the enterprise to adopt, in contrast to Android at large.

Samsung Knox SAFE for work


In addition to Knox, Samsung detailed a variety of other software features that differentiate it from most other Android phones. These features seem to be targeting competing products of other Android makers, rather than Apple's iPhone 5. This meshes with comments made by Apple's marketing chief Phil Schiller that noted the company is seeing four times more Android users switch to iPhones than be wooed away.

While the tech media has manufactured a competitive frenzy between Apple and Samsung, it appears that in reality, Samsung recognizes that its lowest hanging fruit are not Apple's.


Samsung's alternatives to Google



Samsung has already layered its Android offerings with "Touch Wiz," a proprietary add-on package that adds features to Android, such as gesture support, a call blocking mode and modifications that make reaching certain settings easier. New features demonstrated for the Galaxy S 4 appear to follow in the same trend.

A multi view mode (first introduced with the Galaxy Note II) allows users to interact with two apps at once (such a viewing a video while sending an email, as shown below). But other new Samsung features appear aimed more at replacing Google than embellishing Android.


Samsung SAFE



Samsung is definitely working to look like an Apple (particularly in software), but it appears to be doing so more at the expense of Google than Apple. The new "Galaxy S Voice Drive" appears to be Samsung's answer to Siri (and Apple's Eyes Free automotive integration initiative), but it doesn't leverage Google's own services, for example.

Similarly, Samsung's S Translator app lets users convert spoken or written (using optical character recognition) language without Google Translate. And Samsung's Chat On messenger app (depicted below) supports FaceTime-style video calling and screen sharing, as well as viewing picture in picture video from both front and rear camera at once, again without leveraging the company behind Android.


Samsung ChatOn



It's also telling that Samsung recently earned some flack in closely duplicating Apple's Passbook feature, but it did so even as it shunned Google's own NFC-based system developed for Android licensees.

Samsung practices Apple magic



Other more whimsical features proprietary to Samsung, such as eye tracking that prevent the screen from dimming when it detects you're looking at it, and which now allows you to pause video or scroll through content by sensing your eyes' focus, are clearly aimed at earning a reputation for delivering an Apple-like level of "magic," although CNET noted that "both features worked better in theory than they did in practice."
Samsung's eye tracking features "worked better in theory than they did in practice."
Related new "Air View" features, intended to allow users to navigate with hovering hand gestures tracked by the camera rather than multitouch, are also unique to Samsung and not part of Android itself. CNET described these as "a little jerky and jumpy" before adding, "but it did work. As with eye tracking, you'll have to wait a half-second to see results."

A preliminary review by Anandtech said the new features "seemed to work intermittently."

Samsung demonstrated a rash of other novel features, including a Dual Shot camera app feature which similarly allows users to capture front and rear photos that can be combined together in a group shot of sorts. Other camera features are included for creating multiple exposures, GIF animations, or photos accompanied by background sound.

However, Samsung seems to feel most comfortable in copying existing features. It demonstrated a built in IR universal remote just like HTC's, and a Group Play feature that enables multiuser play over Bluetooth just like Apple released in iOS 3.0 (although it adds a novel feature that shares song playback between nearby users of the same phone model, something that may grab the attention of litigious record labels).

Without a flourishing ecosystem of its own, Samsung has decided to create wireless peripherals of its own for the Galaxy S 4, particularly oriented around a Nike Fuel band-like "S Band" and other external sensors for tracking weight and heart rate.

This is notable because it enables the company to take its Galaxy S platform to a new OS in the future simply by replacing Android with Tizen, without upsetting (or even requiring any) third party developers and partners.

New hardware



Samsung seems more comfortable in hardware, giving the Galaxy S 4 (reportedly) a new, home grown Exynos 5 chip. Like the existing Galaxy S III, it packs on 2 GB of system RAM, and supports additional storage via a microSD Card slot.

The new phone also uses a very high resolution, 1080p vast 5-inch display (larger and more pixel dense than its 4.8 inch, 720p Galaxy S III predecessor), and industry-leading support for the fast new 802.11ac WiFi.

It also packs 13MP rear and 2MP front facing cameras, both of which out-spec Apple's iPhone 5.

Where Samsung's event differs from Apple



Unlike Apple does at its own launch events, however, Samsung didn't really show what the advantages of this new hardware was. Are the many cores of the newest Samsung chips speeding up apps or web browsing? Nobody can say yet, although Intel has taken Android to task for being poor at supporting multicore architectures.

In contrast, Apple has always demonstrated the advantage of having promoted features such as multiple processing and graphics cores. Apple has even worked to make its technical underpinnings supporting such multicore support understandable with a consumer-friendly brand names.






Similarly, there wasn't much quantification of whether the new model addressed Samsung's AMOLED screen issues such as poor color accuracy on the Galaxy S III. Samsung also refused to let hands-on reviewers run any apps to benchmark their performance.

Another very non-Apple aspect of the launch was the avoidance of any mention of the new phone's price tag. For both iPhone and iPad launches, Apple has bragged about offering either much greater performance and features at the same price, or in its ability to deliver new products at "breakthrough" prices (like the original iPad) or competitive prices (for the iPad mini).

Samsung has joined Google, Microsoft and Sony in leaving the prices of their recently announced products a secret, even though a product's price serves as a major decision making factor in consumer electronics sales. For Android 3.0 Honeycomb tablets, sticker shock prices turned out to be lethal to the entire category at their launch in 2011.

300,000 apps for everything you love iPad ad


Apple events have even taken competitors to task with side by side performance comparisons, contrasting its products' build size and construction sophistication, and offering unflattering comparisons of rival platforms' lack of apps (alluded to in ads, above) or lack of feature parity in the apps available (below).




Samsung appeared to ignore the entire topic of third party apps, perhaps in part to avoid associating the Galaxy S 4 with its very similar Android competitors at rivals including HTC and LG. As much as Samsung might like to be Apple, it knows that it can't be a long as it uses Android. And based on the company's own statements, it appears that may not continue forever.

So while the tech media prefers to present Samsung as the brand fronting Apple's "archival" Android platform, it actually appears that with the Galaxy S 4, Samsung is now downplaying Android to the point where it can realistically ditch Android in the future, the same way that Apple dropped Power PC as soon as it became practical and possible to do so.
post #2 of 90

All Android manufacturers sell their brand, and their improvements, over regular Android.  

post #3 of 90
But...but... Samsung was supposed to be a godsend for the Android fanboys.! If Samsung tries to pull the rug out from Android, that must mean that Samsung played the Android fanboys like violins!
post #4 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

But...but... Samsung was supposed to be a godsend for the Android fanboys.! If Samsung tries to pull the rug out from Android, that must mean that Samsung played the Android fanboys like violins!

 

Says who?  

 

People who like technology should know better than get attached to a single brand...

post #5 of 90
Samsung went to great lengths to tell the WSJ in an interview that there is no "friction" with Google. Which, of course, means that there is plenty of friction. Google has lost control of Android. Amazon does its own thing, and now so does Samsung. Samsung is the only OEM making any serious money from Android. They should know more than anyone else that it is dangerous to become dependent on a single manufacturer. There's a reason they are pushing their own software solutions. At some point, they want to take everything in house.
post #6 of 90

Well, assuming the HTC One is made just as easily available as the S4, HTC should be able to drastically increase their market share, and balance will be restored to the Android world.  

 

I can't imagine anyone that, seeing the two phones side by side, would go for the GS4 over the One.  

post #7 of 90

Since Apple is taking their time in releasing the new iphone, Samsung didn't have much to copy this time around.  The keynote show what Samsung think of America and the Samsheep is making it out to be like they are being creative with their keynote.  There an article on Cnet written by Molly Wood after the keynote "Samsung GS4 launch: Tone-deaf and shockingly sexist".  She has a point it was offensive and cheesy.

 

I was expecting them to talk about the features in detail about how it will integrate with the S4 and of course Google Android OS under the hood of the S4.  All I saw was two MC quickly talking about the feature and then the actors trying to show off the feature in a cringe worthy moment.

post #8 of 90
"Early last year, Samsung launched its Galaxy Note phablet, followed by the Galaxy S3. HTC launched two One phones, LG the Optimus 4X HD and G, and Sony the Xperia S and T, along with hundreds of other lessor known Android models. So many companies are clamoring to be heard during the Apple quiet period that, ironically, it's rare for any to really make an impression."

Fact is:
Galaxy Note was announced in Oct 2011.
Galaxy Note II was announced in Sep 2012
Galaxy S3 was was announced in May 2012.
Xperia T was announced in Aug 2012.
Xperia S was announced in Mar 2012.
Optimus 4X HD was announced in Feb 2012.
Optimus G was announced in Aug 2012.

I don't know which HTC phones it's referring to but the most popular release in "early last year" should be the HTC One X, which was announced in Apr 2012.

So, when is Apple's quiet period? All year long? What a useless article.
post #9 of 90
hmm

Edited by eksodos - 8/28/13 at 5:12pm
post #10 of 90

DeD must have written this article a week ago and was just waiting for the S4 announcement to publish it. Just editted some stuff here and there.

 

The S4 sucked, the only decent thing they added was the S Health which was a little interesting, but it's not necessary.

post #11 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

Samsung went to great lengths to tell the WSJ in an interview that there is no "friction" with Google. Which, of course, means that there is plenty of friction.

I like this game. So whenever company or a representative from a company says x, the opposite is in fact true?

Does this same logic apply to Apple and Tim cook when he says we shouldn't take notice of dwindling orders from component suppliers and the real truth is things are bad for the iPhone? When he says things are a sideshow they in fact aren't?

I'm guessing no.

We either listen to and trust what these high level executives are saying or its all bull. Which is it and does it only apply to specific companies? Perhaps only your personal biases matter?
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post #12 of 90
If i am not wrong with my predication.
Tizen platform:
Samsung app store
Samsung Muic hub
Samsung S voice
Samsung Nfc alliance:http://www.zdnet.com/samsung-visa-alliance-to-boost-nfc-payments-adoption-7000011810/
Samsung ad services :http://allthingsd.com/20130117/openx-raises-22-5-million-in-round-led-by-samsung-venture-unit/
intel map :http://gizmodo.com/5845948/intel-buys-mobile-mapping-company-for-350-million

That might be true treat to android..

Mr. Shin mobile chief said the new smartphone would be available in the third quarter of this year.

“It’s a somewhat risk mitigation plan. Android has huge market share but…there is more fragmentation and it’s growing but impossible to control,” said an executive at a mobile operating system startup, who declined to be named.
Predication:
Android platform share may decline may 2015
Edited by Selva Raj - 3/14/13 at 10:56pm
post #13 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selva Raj View Post

If i am not wrong with my predication.
Tizen platform:
Samsung app store
Samsung Muic hub
Samsung S voice
Samsung Nfc alliance:http://www.zdnet.com/samsung-visa-alliance-to-boost-nfc-payments-adoption-7000011810/
Samsung ad services :http://allthingsd.com/20130117/openx-raises-22-5-million-in-round-led-by-samsung-venture-unit/
intel map :http://gizmodo.com/5845948/intel-buys-mobile-mapping-company-for-350-million

That might be true treat to android..

Mr. Shin mobile chief said the new smartphone would be available in the third quarter of this year.

“It’s a somewhat risk mitigation plan. Android has huge market share but…there is more fragmentation and it’s growing but impossible to control,” said an executive at a mobile operating system startup, who declined to be named.
Predication:
Android platform share may decline may 2015


I think that's possible but I think Samsung has a better play by forking Android over using Titzen. It would allow them to do create their own ecosystem for, lack of a better term, their Syborg OS as well continue to allow apps from Google Play to be used so that there is no drop in app numbers, but with Syborg app store apps being better vetted and having a more robust SDK and APIs than what Android offers.

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post #14 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by eksodos View Post

Apple's success is built on the foundation of defeating your very logical notion. Unfortunately this blind brand loyalty has widened out into other groups of devout followers who worship the likes of Google, Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo.

When ever you have 2 products with enough popularity, there will always be some percentage of fanbois. It's always been like that. Nintendo vs. Sega. Benz vs. BMW. Geno's vs. Pat's (for you cheese steak fans). The internet has just made this nuts more vocal and fanatical.
Quote:
Why can't we iOS/Android/Windows Phone users focus on the one true thing that unites all of us: 
laughing at blackberry users? 
1biggrin.gif

Haha... crackberry users...

I own...

1 Android Phone, 2 iPads, 1 Nook reader, 1 Mac Desktop, 1 Windows Laptop, 1 Linux Server, 1 FireTV

 

They all are used regularly and each have their place. Competition is good.

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I own...

1 Android Phone, 2 iPads, 1 Nook reader, 1 Mac Desktop, 1 Windows Laptop, 1 Linux Server, 1 FireTV

 

They all are used regularly and each have their place. Competition is good.

Reply
post #15 of 90
If Samsung forks Android, I wonder if Google continues to put their apps on Samsung phones? After all, Google already makes their apps for their competitor iOS. If they don't, the Google apps won't be on very many new Android phones! Even without Google, the main thing Samsung would need is a good-enough map app.
post #16 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

I would choose the S4 because of the camera alone. 13MP over only 4MP.


Do you even know what having more megapixels does? I sold cameras for about 5 years and have been an amateur photographer for about 10.

The more megapixels you have, the larger the photo you can print. for the average person who takes a pic and uploads it to Instagram or Facebook, the most you'd need is 4mp.

Now if you were looking to do high res printing, then by all means please tout all you want about the fact that it's 13mp.
post #17 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

I would choose the S4 because of the camera alone. 13MP over only 4MP. I also like the option of having an SD slot to add another 64GB of storage. It is also lighter and has a slightly larger display which I like as well as a removable battery. They are fairly similar in most specs but I think Samsung overall is a better quality phone than HTC having owned both. I also hate HTC after care support. 

 

As far as seeing the phones side by side, I really don't shop for a phone based on looks though I am sure some people do. But the S4 doesn't appear to me to be an "ugly" phone by any means. It is thinner and slightly smaller than the S3 even with a .3" larger display.

 

From what I understand of the Ultrapixel thing, the HTC basically has the same size sensor, a fairly large aperture, but makes smaller pictures so that the amount of information in each pixel is higher.  

 

I know that with my current phone camera, when I take full 8 MP pictures the pixels can look washed out and grainy...

post #18 of 90
More desperation.
post #19 of 90
I like the idea of capturing a small soundbite along with photos.

As for the general idea that they are distancing themselves from Android, they may be adding new APIs specific to Samsung phones (such as their Passbook equivalent) but I don't imagine they would deliberately remove standard Android APIs. In that sense it's more like Android apps that will do extra if they're on a Samsung phone, rather than making their own class of incompatible apps.

But if all the Android makers did diverge to the point of incompatibility that would be a dream scenario for Apple.
post #20 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeb85 View Post

All Android manufacturers sell their brand, and their improvements, over regular Android.  

Not exactly. Until recently, particularly in the US, the carriers controlled branding. 

post #21 of 90

This is absolutely good news for Apple! 

 

1. Google is all about search advertising. Don't think they "invented" Android for any other purpose than for speeding up smartphones sales outside Apple ecosystem to get search hits. Whether Android is forked or not, Google will turn to partners that can generate the advertising hits. If Samsung goes it's own way, Google will simply turn to Apple.

 

2. Android fragmentation was always good for Apple, however, if Samsung comes out as the biggest Apple competitor, Apple will gain most of the Android crowd, since the brand consolidation is unavoidable...Apple haters will buy Samsung, Blackberry lovers will buy Blackberry, Windows enthusiast will buy Nokia and majority will buy iPhone.

 

3. Ecosystem CANNOT exist without PC. It is impossible to build recognizable, unique and efficient ecosystem around Windows and Linux. Without ecosystem Samsung can rely solely on hardware features with some "additional services". 

 

4. All Apple has to do is:

 

- sell mid-range phone and premium with larger screen, thus spreading the offering in 3 lines...

- iOS7 with leap features

 

so, basically, they have to mend the flop in PM from last year...

post #22 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Not exactly. Until recently, particularly in the US, the carriers controlled branding. 

Very good point! Carriers are shortsighted and pushing cheaper phones which require less subsidy, however, iPhone generates much more revenue later. I have a feeling that carriers do slowly starting to get a point..For Apple, to keep this advantage is absolutely necessary to build larger screen iPhone version.

post #23 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeb85 View Post

All Android manufacturers sell their brand, and their improvements, over regular Android.  

Each brand has their own line of phones using whatever version of Android and then they put their own BS on top of whatever version they are using. And during the course of a couple of years, they only do whatever updates to the OS as they want to.  Samsung is STILL selling older 2.3 Gingerbread phones and I don't think they'll get an update to the OS.    It's kind of a joke if you ask me.  They isn't much consistency, even among the brands like Samsung that make a bunch of different models.  To me, they are just pushing out a bunch of what Apple would call prototypes, instead of focusing on one actual product design.  The features the Android crowd are putting in are questionable. They might make interesting "demos" but from a practical standpoint?  That's questionable.    Air Gesture? Come on, a  phone is used about a foot or two from the user's face.  One doesn't need Air Gestures for that.  Maybe for a BIG TV screen that 6 to 12 feet away, they might, but a foot or two away on a hand held device?  Sorry, but to me, that's just a dumb feature.

post #24 of 90
Quote:

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Samsung's Galaxy S 4 launch appeared poised to leverage Android to further distract the public's attention from Apple's iPhone. Instead, the company appears to have created its own apps and services to distract away from Android.

 

You write as if this is something new but this is revisionist history. Samsung's user interface layer predates Android. Adding custom software and services on top of a smartphone platform has been Samsung (and other manufacturers') plan since the days of Symbian and Windows Mobile. It's one of the major reasons why the smartphone was invented.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Early last year, Samsung launched its Galaxy Note phablet, followed by the Galaxy S3. HTC launched two One phones, LG the Optimus 4X HD and G, and Sony the Xperia S and T, along with hundreds of other lessor known Android models. So many companies are clamoring to be heard during the Apple quiet period that, ironically, it's rare for any to really make an impression.

 

Manufacturers have always launched their big-hitters at this time of year. It coincides with WMC and gives the manufacturers plenty of time to spin-off "safer" products before the holiday season. The iPhone hasn't really changed anything (for better or worse) in this regard.

post #25 of 90
In real size comparison between Galaxy S 4, SIII and iPhone 5, iphone looks miniature :-)

http://www.sizeall.com/compare/Apple-iPhone-5-Samsung-I9300-Galaxy-S-III-Samsung-I9500-Galaxy-S4/615
post #26 of 90
Presentation Format: F- So cringe-worthy horrible it's beyond further commentary.
Copier-Status: Working. Marketing messages copied not only from Apple, but Microsoft and Qualcom as well.
Feature Bombs: everything except S Translate... if it actually works, which remains to be seen.

One feature though... actually product... that I've been hoping that Apple would get around to offering, is an affordable, standalone, and expandable iTunes Home Server, NAS, Cloud... whatever. I know it's the anti-thesis of what Apple and other proprietary cloud services want us to have, however one "key reason" is exactly what the Samsung marketing guy said, "much more storage for a far better price". Naturally the other main reason is that you're not dependent upon a stable and fast broadband Internet connection at all times.

If Apple was to do this, I would expect them to do it right and make available an App to configure and manage the server without a computer. This is (at the moment) the missing link to asking a number of my tech-adverse clients to turn on their WinBox... or even old Mac... ever again. Basically being able to go Total Post-PC, but still be able to save and archive locally your data. Going a step further, being able to mark certain additional items as "Automatic iCloud Backup", would be that added security that everyone should have in case of a local disaster like a fire.

NOTE: the marketing guy for Samsung was actually quite likable... and if I might add, even slightly better than Phil Schiller... WHOM... I must remember to Tweet and remind him to close his eyes, dejavu and recall the many 100's of times he heard SJ say, "STFU Phil... you're doing it wrong! 1oyvey.gif
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post #27 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I think that's possible but I think Samsung has a better play by forking Android over using Titzen.

 

Samsung forks Android.

 

Larry and Sergey's worst forking nightmare...

 

Pot is legal in North Korea.
That explains a considerable amount.

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Pot is legal in North Korea.
That explains a considerable amount.

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post #28 of 90

I don't understand posting articles like this. Samsung released a new phone, yay? I don't need to be wrapped in a reassurance blanket about my phone which is all this article does.

post #29 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

Samsung went to great lengths to tell the WSJ in an interview that there is no "friction" with Google. Which, of course, means that there is plenty of friction. Google has lost control of Android. Amazon does its own thing, and now so does Samsung. Samsung is the only OEM making any serious money from Android. They should know more than anyone else that it is dangerous to become dependent on a single manufacturer. There's a reason they are pushing their own software solutions. At some point, they want to take everything in house.

Exactly. I especially like the "Safe for work" graphic - where most of the 'safe' products are from Apple with one Samsung phone while all the other Android products are 'unsafe'. Doesn't sound like a friction-free relationship between Samsung and Google.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaudiusMaximus View Post

Do you even know what having more megapixels does? I sold cameras for about 5 years and have been an amateur photographer for about 10.

The more megapixels you have, the larger the photo you can print. for the average person who takes a pic and uploads it to Instagram or Facebook, the most you'd need is 4mp.

Now if you were looking to do high res printing, then by all means please tout all you want about the fact that it's 13mp.

That's all true. However, you forgot to mention the tradeoff if you're not printing large pictures - each pixel is much smaller which means less light capturing ability. So under many conditions, the picture from the 4 MP camera can be better than the picture from the 13 MP camera.

It's also worth noting that the lens has an impact. It's very difficult to pack a lens capable of giving good 13 MP images into something the size of a cell phone (although it's easier if your cell phone is the size of a small car).
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post #30 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Eleven View Post

I don't understand posting articles like this. Samsung released a new phone, yay? I don't need to be wrapped in a reassurance blanket about my phone which is all this article does.

 

Well, I did not read it that way.

 

The author gives some clear indications that the biggest (by far) Android phone maker, and the only one making a profit, is definitely only using Android as a stopgap solution. In parallel they are developing an own App catalog, an own OS and replace more and more core Android apps and features with own features. They might not be too good yet, but Samsung is a big company with big pockets. It is only a matter of time. At some point Samsung could be ready to cause the biggest market shift in mobile ever. Bigger than the iPhone launch in 2007 was (the iPhone launch was more impressive, sure, but the smartphone market was tiny back then).

 

Just read the interview the new Samsung CEO gave the WSJ (also covered in detail on The Verge): He slams Windows Phone, Windows Tablets and Windows 8. The best thing he says about Google is that there is "no friction" between the companies. And he promises a "top of the line" and "premium hardware" Tizen phone for later in 2013. Not a BRIC markets low-end device as most people expected, a premium device. Not "sometime", in 2013. There is no tasseography required to see where this goes. If (admittedly a big if) Samsung executes this well, then Tizen will be the third smartphone platform in no time, and a big loss for Google.

post #31 of 90
I'm not so sure that this latest Samsung presentation was Apple-like so much as it was Microsoft-like. Big production number, an emcee with awkward jokes, even a incongruous child actor. Apple presentations tend to be entirely focused on products and numbers. No circus, no Broadway.

It also strikes me that one big reason Samsung may have distanced itself from Android and Google is the huge market in China. Google is all but dead in China. All of their major web offerings are either banned or outcompeted by local providers. Most Android phones sold in China come without Google Play or other core Google apps. Google's relationship with the Chinese government is strained to put it mildly.

Samsung's big flashy show might have been presented in American English. But I suspect that its true audience was half a world away.
post #32 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by eksodos View Post

... Apple's success is built on the foundation of defeating your very logical notion. Unfortunately this blind brand loyalty has widened out into other groups of devout followers who worship the likes of Google, Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo. ...

 

There's nothing really new about this. There have been loyal followers of Microsoft for as long as there have been fans of Apple. The only reason Apple followers were referred to as a cult was that there were fewer of them than those who followed the Microsoft orthodoxy. These days, those whose psychology would have aligned them with Microsoft are followers of Google's doctrine, which isn't surprising since there are so many similarities between Microsoft and Google.

post #33 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeb85 View Post

Well, assuming the HTC One is made just as easily available as the S4, HTC should be able to drastically increase their market share, and balance will be restored to the Android world.  

 

I can't imagine anyone that, seeing the two phones side by side, would go for the GS4 over the One.  

 

I can't imagine anyone would pick a crappy copy-cat cloner android phone over an iphone.

post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaker's Ugly Brother View Post

I'm not so sure that this latest Samsung presentation was Apple-like so much as it was Microsoft-like. Big production number, an emcee with awkward jokes, even a incongruous child actor. Apple presentations tend to be entirely focused on products and numbers. No circus, no Broadway.

It also strikes me that one big reason Samsung may have distanced itself from Android and Google is the huge market in China. Google is all but dead in China. All of their major web offerings are either banned or outcompeted by local providers. Most Android phones sold in China come without Google Play or other core Google apps. Google's relationship with the Chinese government is strained to put it mildly.

Samsung's big flashy show might have been presented in American English. But I suspect that its true audience was half a world away.

 

I watched the show and it was just embarassing in my opinion. Not sure what they were going for but it was like watching some terrible B movie.

post #35 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by GalaxyTab View Post


I like this game. So whenever company or a representative from a company says x, the opposite is in fact true?

Does this same logic apply to Apple and Tim cook when he says we shouldn't take notice of dwindling orders from component suppliers and the real truth is things are bad for the iPhone? When he says things are a sideshow they in fact aren't?

 

No, but if a reporter is asking about "friction", it's likely because he knows through sources that there is "friction", it's not just a random question thrown out. The fact that a company representative finds himself in a position of having to confirm or deny the existence of "friction" is very likely an indicator that the "friction" exists.

 

As for "dwindling orders" from component suppliers, we take those with a healthy dose of salt because, as DED likes to write, this all happened before, and the "dwindling orders" rumors turned out to be false or of no consequence.

 

In other words, the game is, to steal a line from Newsroom, to apply logic and reason and see where that takes us. 

post #36 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormM View Post

If Samsung forks Android, I wonder if Google continues to put their apps on Samsung phones? After all, Google already makes their apps for their competitor iOS. If they don't, the Google apps won't be on very many new Android phones! Even without Google, the main thing Samsung would need is a good-enough map app.

 

Samsung could fork Android, and Google wouldn't have much choice but to put their apps on it, since that's the only game Google has. On the other hand, not forking Android allows Samsung to take advantage of Google as a free software development service. That's also, obviously, the advantage of Android ovr Tizen for them. And, if there's anything Samsung likes, it's having someone else do the heavy lifting for them.

 

What Samsung is more likely to do, especially as they continue to crush the Android competition, is use their position as the only Android game in town, and on the strength of their Galaxy brand, to dictate to Google what constitutes "Android". In effect, Google will end up losing control of Android and the OHA, and there's not much they can do about it. The one thing they could do is dump Android and try to replace it with Chrome or something else. Interesting that Andy Rubin just left the Android division.

post #37 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Eleven View Post

I don't understand posting articles like this. Samsung released a new phone, yay? I don't need to be wrapped in a reassurance blanket about my phone which is all this article does.

 

What the writer doesn't disclose is that he's an Apple shareholder. His pieces attempt to manipulate Apple's share-price upwards.

post #38 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

Samsung went to great lengths to tell the WSJ in an interview that there is no "friction" with Google. Which, of course, means that there is plenty of friction. Google has lost control of Android. Amazon does its own thing, and now so does Samsung. Samsung is the only OEM making any serious money from Android. They should know more than anyone else that it is dangerous to become dependent on a single manufacturer. There's a reason they are pushing their own software solutions. At some point, they want to take everything in house.

 

Who is to blame on that?  The hardware innovation is hard to come.  Android manufacturers have to distinguish themselves from the competition by adding features or, in Amazon's case, it needs to sell its products for giving the device away at cost.

post #39 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

Samsung could fork Android, and Google wouldn't have much choice but to put their apps on it, since that's the only game Google has. On the other hand, not forking Android allows Samsung to take advantage of Google as a free software development service. That's also, obviously, the advantage of Android ovr Tizen for them. And, if there's anything Samsung likes, it's having someone else do the heavy lifting for them.

 

What Samsung is more likely to do, especially as they continue to crush the Android competition, is use their position as the only Android game in town, and on the strength of their Galaxy brand, to dictate to Google what constitutes "Android". In effect, Google will end up losing control of Android and the OHA, and there's not much they can do about it. The one thing they could do is dump Android and try to replace it with Chrome or something else. Interesting that Andy Rubin just left the Android division.


If Google pulls the Map from Android, the platform will collapse immediately.  It can replace it with a new one if they choose to do so.  

post #40 of 90

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 9:27am
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