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Nest founder: 'We don't expect people to buy a new one of these every year'

post #1 of 46
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AI at Expand: While Nest founder Matt Rogers says his company will continue to come out with new hardware iterations of its iOS-compatible learning thermostat, the device is built for durability, and Nest doesn't expect customers to go out and buy a new model every year.

rogers


Rogers' remarks came in the midst of a "Fireside Chat" on Saturday at Engadget's Expand conference in San Francisco, Calif. The Nest founder said that Nest, since it is meant to become a part of an owner's home, isn't like some other types of consumer electronics.


"We don't expect people to buy a new Nest every year," Rogers said. "It's not like a smartphone. We don't expect our users to do that. These things should stay for five or ten years, so we're relying a lot on software updates, going forward. We're going to have hardware updates, but a lot of our changes are going to come through software."

Rogers continued, saying that the device had been designed to meld into the overall aesthetics of a home.

"There's a reasons we didn't give this a sort of white plastic enclosure," Rogers said, explaining the aluminum body of the Nest, "we designed it to be a chameleon, where it adjusts to your home and reflects the light around your home."

rogers again


The Nest's minimalist aesthetic was a deliberate choice, Rogers said, with the design team actively choosing to leave features out.

"Doing something simply is challenging. Keeping that discipline was very challenging for all of us. We had the option to throw in a clock, so you could walk by and see what time it is. But that's something we have to fight back against every day."

Nest's thermostat showed up in Apple's online store last year, and is also available in the company's retail stores. Rogers says the opportunity for consumers to get the device in their hands is a big reason behind the company's success.

"We're pretty disruptive in this space. It's now a consumer decision, so the customer gets to check out the device in their hands."

nest


Rogers said that the feedback from Nest owners has been quite encouraging, and that he daily receives emails and tweets from customers telling how much money they've saved using the device. He put the total savings of the company into context toward the end of the talk.

"Since we launched, we've saved 600,000kWh," he explained. "That's enough to fly a 747 to the moon and back six times. Of course, you can't take a 747 to the moon, but, say, you could power a city for some time on the power we've saved."

Going forward, Rogers said that Nest will be coming out with further hardware iterations. The company will also be looking to continue partnering with power companies and home designers to get its learning thermostat into more homes.
post #2 of 46

Well, duh. It's a thermostat. I wish more tech was built with this idea in mind.

 

They have a nice model, though, whereby a family can buy one, learn it, like it, and then buy a couple more (should their HVAC system support it) and then use Nest's software to control parts of their house separately.

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post #3 of 46
Waiting for it to support line voltage.
post #4 of 46
I like it...it's one of the few electronic devices I would buy that is not made by Apple! 1smile.gif
post #5 of 46
1) Bought two of the 2nd gen models for a dual-HVAC controlled home late last year. They are working great.

2) The only issue is having to input the WiFI password manually the first time using the dial. The iOS app couldn't be simpler.

3) I wonder if cheaper, relay-only sensors you mount throughout your home might help give a more accurate mapping of who's home, where they reside and when, and the temperatures within in room.

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post #6 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) Bought two of the 2nd gen models for a dual-HVAC controlled home late last year. They are working great.

2) The only issue is having to input the WiFI password manually the first time using the dial. The iOS app couldn't be simpler.

3) I wonder if cheaper, relay-only sensors you mount throughout your home might help give a more accurate mapping of who's home, where they reside and when, and the temperatures within in room.

I saw a standalone display of these in Lowes last week and almost picked one up myself. I'm not yet convinced of the savings tho, so what's been your experience so far on the money side?

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post #7 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I saw a standalone display of these in Lowes last week and almost picked one up myself. I'm not yet convinced of the savings tho, so what's been your experience so far on the money side?

No idea. They were a Christmas gift for my parents home. I was informed that their power bill would list the previous year's usage but since installing them I've been told they don't. Only two full months of usage have gone by. I've also failed to get the per day usage from those month's billa so I can't evenkeep a record of it in a spreadsheet.

I do think it's clear the savings are real. You get an intuitive system that has motion sensors that doesn't need to be adjusted. As they state in their marketing video, programmable thermostats aren't new, but they are rarely programmed and even more rarely programmed accurately.

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post #8 of 46
Insulate your home properly, set it to a constant, comfortable temperature, and you're done. You'll save FAR more money, the entire family and all your pets will be FAR more comfortable (oo, need to pad off to the bathroom at 2 am? Too bad it's 50 bloody degrees, eh?)

Seriously people, wake up and smell the coffee. You're paying to heat and cool the outdoors. Stop doing that. Best investment you can make in bill reduction, and unlike a thermostat that plays freeze-your-toes-at-night, the investment will pay you back the entire time you own your home.

Start by buying a cheap thermal sensor gun, plug all the little holes and leaks. There will be plenty. Then call an insulation company and see what they can offer you. Your wallet will thank you. So will your bare feet. And you can put your sweaters away.

Oh yeah... new construction? Contract for thicker, better insulated walls. Go overboard. It's not even that costly. Your power and gas companies will hate you for it.
post #9 of 46
Hard to say how much money I have actually saved in using a nest. But I have had the nest for just over year and just from smarter scheduling and auto away in February my power usage was 28hours less then the previous year, and this year was colder on average then last year
post #10 of 46
I spend hundreds, nay, thousands of dollars a year getting my eyes put back in, since I have to gouge them out every time I look at my old ugly thermostat. Should've gone with Nest.
post #11 of 46
We are getting ready to put our house on the market, but I've made it clear our next house, I will replace the existing thermostats with these, and also get these Phillips hue lights. This and the ability to FaceTime the various Macs in my house (via LogMeIn on my iPad) and ill have a great sense of security.
post #12 of 46

Fyngryz makes an interesting point. I wonder if we just set our thermostats at 68 and left them there, wouldn't that be the most efficient? Besides the obvious lowering the heat if we are going to be gone all of February.

 

I had two 40-gallon hot water tanks in my home (dunno why) and replaced those with a Hot Water on Demand system. My heating and stove and hot water are fueled by Propane. I couldn't stand the thought of TWO huge burners going 24/7 to heat those tanks of water.

 

I kept a spreadsheet and my Propane use has gone down 100 gallons per year, saving me roughly $200/year. And I've been abusive, taking longer, hotter showers, just to spite Al Gore.

 

The savings are more in years where the average price of Propane is over $2/gallon.

 

I also bought some LED lights that I choose to leave on when I'm gone. The outdoor lights are LED as well.

 

That's my contribution.

post #13 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

Fyngryz makes an interesting point. I wonder if we just set our thermostats at 68 and left them there, wouldn't that be the most efficient? Besides the obvious lowering the heat if we are going to be gone all of February.

I had two 40-gallon hot water tanks in my home (dunno why) and replaced those with a Hot Water on Demand system. My heating and stove and hot water are fueled by Propane. I couldn't stand the thought of TWO huge burners going 24/7 to heat those tanks of water.

I kept a spreadsheet and my Propane use has gone down 100 gallons per year, saving me roughly $200/year. And I've been abusive, taking longer, hotter showers, just to spite Al Gore.

The savings are more in years where the average price of Propane is over $2/gallon.

I also bought some LED lights that I choose to leave on when I'm gone. The outdoor lights are LED as well.

That's my contribution.

It might use less power and therefore be more cost effective but that isn't how I judge efficiency in this case. When it comes to heating and cooling the goal is to make the personal ideal with as little waste and effort as possible.

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post #14 of 46

I wish I had some use for the Nest. I just don't. Nice concept but limited addressable market. I have three homes and only one of them even has a thermostat. I realize many people need to improve their heating and cooling efficiency but it just doesn't apply to me. Sounds like a good product but difficult to sell since it probably requires installation by professionals and does not represent itself as a must have consumer electronic device. Most people who already have a programable thermostat don't even utilize the features already available so their perceived need to replace it is very low.

 

I love how the discussion took place during the "Fireside Chat" how ironic.

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post #15 of 46
Some people's comments are uninformed. The biggest savings from the Nest comes from that last ~15 minutes of use. Whether it is your AC or Heat, it turns them off minutes prior to reaching your temperature and just runs the fan. This takes advantage of the heat for a few minutes without using the heat. So I save about an hour a day in my experience of run time. This adds up.

The rest is easy. It's programmed. It doesn't drop to 50F in my house at night. If I leave and forget to set it to away, it will or I can via my phone. I can start it up prior to returning from home if I need too.

I upgraded to the 2.0 because it supported dual fuel units. I don't plan on updating it again for a very long time.

We calculated we saved about $15 per month compared to our former thermostat.
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post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I wish I had some use for the Nest. I just don't. Nice concept but limited addressable market. I have three homes and only one of them even has a thermostat. I realize many people need to improve their heating and cooling efficiency but it just doesn't apply to me. Sounds like a good product but difficult to sell since it probably requires installation by professionals and does not represent itself as a must have consumer electronic device. Most people who already have a programable thermostat don't even utilize the features already available so their perceived need to replace it is very low.

I love how the discussion took place during the "Fireside Chat" how ironic.

The thing is, this is not an additional thermostat, it is a replacement. If you can turn a screw 8 times, you can install this. Four wires that are color coded and already there.
post #17 of 46
I have had the Nest for almost 2 months now, and I have seen major savings in my gas bill already. Before I got the Nest I just had my thermostat set on one temp and left it there. I love being able to control it with the app even when away from home. I was already my gas usage with a spreadsheet a periodic gas meter readings prior to getting the Nest, so I was in a pretty good position to see how much I was saving on my bill after getting the Nest. The first month using the Nest my gas bill dropped $45 from the previous month even though February was colder than January. $45 savings in the first month alone was amazing!!!! My speadsheet tracks gas bills for the last 3 years, and based on the current usage I am on track to use significantly less gas on the march bill than I did a year ago. This thing is AMAZING!!
post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by starbird73 View Post

 If you can turn a screw 8 times, you can install this. Four wires that are color coded and already there.

Sure I could do it but most home owners would not attempt it. 

 

It just seems like a hard sell to me from the perspective of a mass market consumer item.

 

Not saying it is ineffective just that people resist change. Solar power makes a lot of sense too but for some reason people just don't want it.

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post #19 of 46
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Solar power makes a lot of sense too but for some reason people just don't want it.

 

It's inefficient and you need too many panels for it to be a full replacement for your electricity needs. Never mind that most people don't live where they could take advantage of such a solution.

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post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Solar power makes a lot of sense too but for some reason people just don't want it.

 

It's inefficient and you need too many panels for it to be a full replacement for your electricity needs. Never mind that most people don't live where they could take advantage of such a solution.

I would like to inform you that a full replacement is not the objective, You install panels and they feed back into the grid so you save on your electricity usage not fully replace it although you could. The pay back is around 15 years however that timeline could be shortened if electricity costs go up which they might.

 

Also your assertion that most people do not live where solar power can be taken advantage of is just nonsense. The majority of the world's population live close to the equatorial region where solar power is very appropriate.


Edited by mstone - 3/16/13 at 8:18pm

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post #21 of 46

I don't remember when I bought my Nest but my first Nest Energy Report was delivered in May 2012. I have a very easy heating schedule (no AC) but the ease with which we can adjust the temperature, set it to the Away mode, or turn it off because my wife gets hot flashes makes it well worth the cost. I've used plenty of thermostats that were very difficult to configure. The Nest is easy. We drop the temperature at night because it's not required and it doesn't take very long to warm the house back up in the morning. The nice things about the Report is it gives you some reasons why your usage went up or down. This is a complete package, something no other thermostat maker does. The best thing about it is it just works so you don't have to constantly mess around with it. Sound familiar?

post #22 of 46
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
I would like to inform you that a full replacement is not the objective, You install panels and they feed back into the grid so you save on your electricity usage not fully replace it although you could. The pay back is around 15 years however that timeline could be shortened if electricity costs go up which they might.

 

So something ELSE that takes 15 years to pay off and which isn't a replacement for or better solution than that which is already in place.

 

And you wonder why people haven't adopted it.

 

Look, when I can grab ~5 panels for a grand a pop, drop 'em on my roof, and have all my electricity needs taken care of, then I'll adopt. Until then, I won't and I don't see any meaningful number of people doing the same, either.

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post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So something ELSE that takes 15 years to pay off and which isn't a replacement for or better solution than that which is already in place.

 

And you wonder why people haven't adopted it.

 

Look, when I can grab ~5 panels for a grand a pop, drop 'em on my roof, and have all my electricity needs taken care of, then I'll adopt. Until then, I won't and I don't see any meaningful number of people doing the same, either.

A very large portion of the US population do not own their own home so investing in personal solar power is not an option for them. If you do own your own home and have the appropriate installation site it make a lot of sense. I know a few people who have gone completely of grid with their electricity. I have no solar panels at this time although I plan to install some on my property in Central America to run the well pump and the pressure pump just in case of power outages. Perhaps more later but it takes a lot of planning to incorporate Solar DC/AC conversion into your home.

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post #24 of 46

Well how many people actually have a house or living quarters that this device will work well on?  Well enough.  That way this device will sell and make money for this guy.  After all it isn't an iPhone.

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post #25 of 46
I have one of the first gen Nests and it's great.  I've done some insulation improvements and am working on more, but it's been very useful.  Once you program in your temperature range and times of day, you're golden, and it's easy.
 
I was gone for two weeks over Christmas, forgot to turn off the thermostat, no problem because auto-away shut it down.  Only ran when it got super cold and the safety temp set in to keep pipes from freezing.  Through the app you can see it's usage, or the website, and you are emailed Nest energy reports at the end of every month.  It's really set it and forget it.  Plus it's gorgeous and everyone asks about it.
 
Room for improvement - remote sensors throughout the house, and perhaps a way to use that information such as self-shutting or self-adjusting registers in a few key rooms.  These both exist already, but they're far from being as refined as the Nest is.  
 
I'm glad they're working on improvements, but new units every year seems dumb.  Thermostats should last decades, not a decade.  I hope they don't plan to force me to upgrade through planned obsolescence, because that's going to engender some ill will.
post #26 of 46
A beautifully designed device.
I don't think we can get them here in Australia. I don't care about the heating/cooling savings, I want a minimalist and functional thermostat that is smart and looks beautiful.
The ugly plastic thing I have now is truly disgusting and a nightmare to use.
post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I would like to inform you that a full replacement is not the objective, You install panels and they feed back into the grid so you save on your electricity usage not fully replace it although you could. The pay back is around 15 years however that timeline could be shortened if electricity costs go up which they might.

Also your assertion that most people do not live where solar power can be taken advantage of is just nonsense. The majority of the world's population live close to the equatorial region where solar power is very appropriate.
15 years payback vs (many cases) less than 1 year?

How much for ONE solar panel? Can I personally install that?

I have four Nests all installed by me (the first one with a little help from their EXCELLENT tech support), 3 first gen and 1 second gen for our new HVAC unit at home. My business has saved over 80 hours per month of HVAC use with 2 Nest units.

I absolutely love the Internet access. I can change the temp right from the bed. Keep it cool at night and add a thick comforter is my preferred way. Your way may be different. But the Nest is one small part of the overall energy saving lifestyle. Others have mentioned excellent and cheap modalities. 2¢
post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So something ELSE that takes 15 years to pay off and which isn't a replacement for or better solution than that which is already in place.

And you wonder why people haven't adopted it.

Look, when I can grab ~5 panels for a grand a pop, drop 'em on my roof, and have all my electricity needs taken care of, then I'll adopt. Until then, I won't and I don't see any meaningful number of people doing the same, either.

Do a Google search for "net metering". The sun is on all the time (except at night). New electric meters can actually run backwards as your production exceeds your demands, while you're at work, or when your Nest Thermostat decides you don't need heating and A/C. It's too expensive for me right now, but your conception of solar power is antiquated.

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post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryA View Post


Do a Google search for "net metering". The sun is on all the time (except at night). New electric meters can actually run backwards as your production exceeds your demands, while you're at work, or when your Nest Thermostat decides you don't need heating and A/C. It's too expensive for me right now, but your conception of solar power is antiquated.

The meters run backwards? Well - yes until your energy supplier finds out. If it were only that simple. Once you get solar, almost all electricity suppliers demand you get an export type meter. That way they can pay you 20% of what you pay them per KWH   :(

post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So something ELSE that takes 15 years to pay off and which isn't a replacement for or better solution than that which is already in place.

And you wonder why people haven't adopted it.

Look, when I can grab ~5 panels for a grand a pop, drop 'em on my roof, and have all my electricity needs taken care of, then I'll adopt. Until then, I won't and I don't see any meaningful number of people doing the same, either.

First, solar pays for itself in far less than 15 years in some parts of the country. I've seen cases where it paid for itself in as little as 3 years.

Second, the main issue is one of 'cost to society' vs 'cost to the individual'. Our existing fuel sources are so heavily subsidized by society (look up 'externalities') that the energy user is paying only a small fraction of the cost and society is picking up the rest. If you look at it from society's cost, fossil fuels are every bit as expensive (sometimes more expensive) than solar or wind. So society should be (and is) encouraging solar via things like rebates and incentives.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

AI at Expand: While Nest founder Matt Rogers says his company will continue to come out with new hardware iterations of its iOS-compatible learning thermostat, the device is built for durability, and Nest doesn't expect customers to go out and buy a new model every year.

No kidding. You mean people aren't going to drop $300 to replace a thermostat every year just for the style?

I can understand that it might make sense to replace a conventional thermostat with a Nest thermostat. Energy savings are the main driver. But once you already have a Nest thermostat, there's no reason to change - and I can't imagine that anyone ever considered it. Sounds like a silly statement to even bother making.
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post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Right_said_fred View Post

The meters run backwards? Well - yes until your energy supplier finds out. If it were only that simple. Once you get solar, almost all electricity suppliers demand you get an export type meter. That way they can pay you 20% of what you pay them per KWH   1frown.gif

Not true at all. In most cases, they have to pay you at least as much for electricity you sell them as you pay for electricity you buy from them. In some cases, they pay much more. In some cases, they have to pay for the energy at peak rates while you pay prevailing rates for the time you use the energy (as in, night rates are much lower). In other cases, there is a surcharge that they have to pay you for clean energy.

I read about one area where the consumer purchases electricity for $0.08 / kWh and sells it back for $0.17/kwh. They were actually able to make a nice profit on their system.
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post #32 of 46
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Not true at all. In most cases, they have to pay you at least as much for electricity you sell them as you pay for electricity you buy from them. In some cases, they pay much more. In some cases, they have to pay for the energy at peak rates while you pay prevailing rates for the time you use the energy (as in, night rates are much lower). In other cases, there is a surcharge that they have to pay you for clean energy.

I read about one area where the consumer purchases electricity for $0.08 / kWh and sells it back for $0.17/kwh. They were actually able to make a nice profit on their system.

You could be right overall. Dunno as I haven't checked outside of my home state. At least here Florida Power uses a little sleight-of-hand to imply it's an equal trade-off for the homeowner who produces excess renewable energy. It's not, instead favoring the power company.

 

Rather than paying at least the same rate as they sold energy to you, they apparently compute the payments to the homeowner based on what they didn't have to spend to produce it themselves, referred to by "As-Available Avoided Energy Cost". With FPL choosing how it's defined and computed, it's of course somewhat less than what the homeowner pays FPL. Advantage power company. For a state with as much solar power production potential as Florida it's certainly not very friendly or encouraging to the solar-power industry IMO.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.fpl.com/rates/pdf/electric_tariff_section10.pdf


Edited by Gatorguy - 3/17/13 at 8:37am
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post #33 of 46
We love ours. Nest 2.0 works perfectly. Remodeled when switching from oil forced hot air / rice coal stoker to natural gas. I love the lockout so my kids don't mess with it. Love the wifi hookup to my apple extreme. I can control it with an app I got for my macs/phones/pads. But my favorite part has to be run time. The little energy bar that tells me exactly how long every day the call for heat has been and weather it was me or the weather the changed that. multi stage heating works great. showed my wife the graph and said see all these little icons... thats you messing with the stat. Quit touching it. Well it's been almost 3 months now, and she doesn't touch it at all anymore. We have a schedule that works for my 2 story home perfectly. The location of the stat just happened to be perfect to the most foot traffic. Good placement and settings and this thing is a winner.
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

At least here Florida Power uses a little sleight-of-hand to imply it's an equal trade-off for the homeowner who produces excess renewable energy. It's not, instead favoring the power company.

 

 

In Southern California, Edison just installed new digital meters that they can monitor from their control center without having a meter reader. Apparently they don't run backwards without some special configuration, but they are still happy to receive your home grown energy. In most cases, home owners opted for the discount configuration that enables the power to be automatically cut to your AC unit during brown out or rolling black out conditions during heat waves. There are so many multi-story office complexes around here which use a tremendous amount of energy for AC and the power company can't always deliver enough so they are encouraging home owners to install solar with rebates and discounts. Solar is only cost effective for the home owner if the power company is willing to pay you for your excess power.

 

Another practical arrangement though, is if you can keep an electric car plugged in during the day. Many people are at work during the day so this is not always convenient. That is why it is essential that the power company pay you for your power because you are generating power during peak usage times while you are at work, during the daylight hours, and consuming power at night when there is less demand.

 

Off grid solar is just too complicated to consider for the average home owner. On-grid solar does not provide any power during a power company black out. It only produces power if there is grid line voltage. This is a safety feature as the electricity workers don't want any reverse power coming through the lines if they are trying to work on them to restore the power during an outage.


Edited by mstone - 3/17/13 at 10:14am

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post #35 of 46
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Originally Posted by pablorph View Post

 
How much for ONE solar panel? Can I personally install that?
 

Installing one panel is not wise since you need a system with an inverter, a lot of wiring, etc, so no you cannot install it yourself. You really need to evaluate your electricity needs first. Depending on your needs and available installation site, weather, latitude and power company cooperation, you ideally would want perhaps 12 panels or around 3,000W which might be suitable for a 2,000 sq. ft. home even though it would not provide all your electricity needs especially if you are running the AC. 

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post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by fyngyrz View Post

Insulate your home properly, set it to a constant, comfortable temperature, and you're done.
 

You will always save more money by setting a lower temperature when you're away in the winter and a higher temperature when you're away in the summer. http://fivepercent.us/2009/01/20/dont-set-your-programmable-thermostat-too-low-myth/ An automatic thermostat, and especially a smart one like Nest, make this easier.

post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by chabig View Post

You will always save more money by setting a lower temperature when you're away in the winter and a higher temperature when you're away in the summer. http://fivepercent.us/2009/01/20/dont-set-your-programmable-thermostat-too-low-myth/ An automatic thermostat, and especially a smart one like Nest, make this easier.

If you do the maximum amount of insulation an forward-thinking planning to increase power efficiency I don't see why a $250 thermostat won't save you money in the long run.

The best way to save money is to have the bare minimum cubic space to regulate but I don't think I've ever heard anyone say, "get a smaller home to save money on heating and cooling." I have heard people express how their electric bills are lower after going to a smaller home but I've never heard the specific cubic space of climate controlled space as a reason for the change.

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post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

If you do the maximum amount of insulation an forward-thinking planning to increase power efficiency I don't see why a $250 thermostat won't save you money in the long run.

Actually, the better insulated and more energy efficient your home is, the LESS money you'll save with an expensive thermostat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

The best way to save money is to have the bare minimum cubic space to regulate but I don't think I've ever heard anyone say, "get a smaller home to save money on heating and cooling." I have heard people express how their electric bills are lower after going to a smaller home but I've never heard the specific cubic space of climate controlled space as a reason for the change.

I've heard that from a number of people.
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post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Actually, the better insulated and more energy efficient your home is, the LESS money you'll save with an expensive thermostat.

That's completely different than saying a learning thermostat won't save you money so long as you invest heavily in insulation.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #40 of 46

Maybe not a new Nest every year but I'm sure there are other product they could come out with in home automation that would link-up with the Nest.  Belkin has wifi enabled outlets that you can control via iPhone or Android but what about light switches too.  To monitor and control those items in the house would be neat as well.  A Nest garage door monitor would be helpful to alert if it is open for too long of a duration with sensors to detect entry into the garage area.  I guess a security system in general would be neat to see from this company.

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