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BlackBerry CEO calls Apple's iPhone user interface outdated - Page 3

post #81 of 264

It seems to me implementing a OS X Dashboard like feature would be the best thing to do to shut up the press and competitors on this issue, at least for a little while.   One option would be added to the settings pane with only 3 options or so under it (so you could make the dashboard the home screen, for instance), plus an area to add/remove widgets.  

 

No need to go crazy and fundamentally change the whole interface.  That would be a mistake.  Just bring something from OS X to iOS.  It would open a whole new market in the App Store for widgets, and it would look radically different without BEING radically different.  Apple could even curve the "stolen from Android" crap by using advertising and marketing to point out that Android stole the widget idea from Apple first.

 

I'd be shocked if Apple doesn't do something like this soon, though they'll probably come up with something similar but better and then port to OS X.

post #82 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefish86 View Post

This.

 

An overhaul would be a huge mistake, but they've been sitting still for too long.

 

Everyone keeps asking what Apple could improve:

  1. Home screen. It works fine for <50 apps, but when you're up to 200+ it gets really clumsy. You either put in constant effort to keep it rationally sorted (folder size limit and lack of nested folders means re-categorizing as apps get added and deleted), or end up with 8+ unorganized screens like my wife.
  2. Multi-tasking. Which apps are still running? What if there's an app I want to keep running, and others I want killed immediately? Automatic management is great, but the ability to give manual hints would be fantastic. Yes you can manually kill an app but its SLOW to get to. What about a fast way to flick back and forth between a pair of apps rapidly? Currently the double-press on home is really cumbersome. Gestures on the iPad are great but the iPhone needs a parallel.
  3. Rapid access to settings. Ie toggles for bluetooth, wifi, tethering, airplane mode, airplay etc... This has been something people have wanted forever.
  4. Document management. The current system works for now, but it's already starting to get unwieldly. You have to go into the app that "owns" the document, and count on that app to give you a (sometimes very long) list of other apps to open it in. Then each app has its own copy, and you have to remember which is newest. There is no way of picking a default app to handle a document type.

 

How could these things be improved? (not all ideas are compatible with each other)

 

Home screen

  • Add a section (ie half a page, or even a full page) that gets automatically populated with the most used apps, not the most recent apps.
  • Make the far-right page be all your apps in an automatically-categorized list. Make it so that apps no longer have to live on other pages, this can be the only page they exist on for lesser-utilized apps.

 

Multi-tasking

  • Swipe up from the bottom to show the multi-tasking tray. Only show apps that are still running. Add a check to each app icon that means "try to keep me running at the expense of other apps". Change double-press home to "immediately quit the foreground app".
  • Allow interacting with the foreground app while the multi-tasking tray is still open on "tall" devices. All apps already support the shorter aspect ratio for legacy devices anyways.

 

Settings

  • Add a notification center widget for the main toggles.
  • Make a new splash-page for the main settings app that puts these settings front and center right away
  • Add a screen that can be popped up at any time without interrupting the current app with access to these toggles, perhaps launched from the multitasking tray or notification center.

 

Documents

  • Obviously security is a huge concern here, but you could implement an implied-consent system based on a system-controlled "open file" screen that only grants an app access to a document when a user picks it. Automatic versioning would limit the damage an app could do, since the user could always roll back the document. "Recent documents" for each app could be built into the open file screen, adding convenience while maintaining the consent system.
  • To keep user friendliness,  make it a document library sortable based on document type, name, date saved, saved by app etc... similar to the "Music" interface. No direct filesystem exposure to the user. Only documents openable by the app show up in that app's open dialog. Obviously there would be a master "Documents" app that allows the user to see them all, manage them and perform a "Open With..." and "Share" functions. Apps like Mail could use the same interface to pick attachments.

 

So don't say there's nothing Apple could improve.

 

I was going to do a point by point rebuttal but there is so much repetition in this "list" and so much of it is based on extreme edge cases that it just isn't worth it.  

 

You seem to have no idea about UI design in general and are just listing a lot of crap that you think would make your personal experience better.  UI design is about doing what's best for the most people.  It's about making it work for everyone.  Your extreme focus on multi-tasking is something that most people just don't care about for instance.  Your idea about a system wide document/file system would "break" the entire system also.  

 

Most of what you want would be a complete hinderance to me, and probably for many others.  Again, the whole point of good UI design is to make it work for everyone, or failing that, for the most people possible.  

post #83 of 264
If he thinks it's outdated then maybe he should come up with the next best thing ad get his company back in the game?! Oh wait, he's waiting for Apple to do it so they can copy it. Idiot. It's 5 years old, but it still works well. How long did Blackberries all look and work the same? More than 5 years!!!!
post #84 of 264

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 9:30am
post #85 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevt View Post

 

The general interface is good in the general working of the device, but the App launcher is visually dull, uninformative, lacks functionality and customisation options. Even when it was introduced it was hardly innovative: the resemblance to Palm OS launchers would make even a Samsung lawyer blush. And one of the most popular App types on the Palm platform was alternative launchers.

 

The importance of this shouldn't be underestimated - when people try out smartphones in the shop they won't get into the individual Apps in any great depth, but they see and interact a lot with the launcher to see what's on it.

 

Also the OS should also be smart enough to recognise when Twitter, FaceBook data is not set up. I dislike being presented with these options when I want to 'send' something. 

 

Some good points. But I think accusing Apple of plagiarizing Palm would be off the mark. Having said that, it is a valid argument in the discuss of how much is Android/Samsung copying Apple?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

First, what the hell is the "App launcher"?  I wasn't aware iOS had one.  

 

This statement alone shows how completely out of touch you are with the average iOS user in that if you asked a hundred people to tell you what the "App launcher" in iOS was, I would think the only answer you would get is "my finger."

 

Secondly, the resemblance to Palm is superficial at best, as is the resemblance of Palm's home screen to Newton's (which is where they got the idea from in the first place).  


iOS indeed has an app launcher - It is the home screen itself. There are also various 3rd party app launchers. So I am afraid you are the one out of touch.

post #86 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

Because its only a matter of time before something better comes out. I think his point is...you should never rest on your laurels or else you'll turn into a Blackberry. Don't think it can't happen to Apple. 

Obviously.

But who says that Apple is resting on its laurels? Apple has a history of innovating faster than anyone else in the industry (in some cases, innovating faster than the rest of the industry put together). It's not likely that they're going to simply stop.
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post #87 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Obviously.

But who says that Apple is resting on its laurels? Apple has a history of innovating faster than anyone else in the industry (in some cases, innovating faster than the rest of the industry put together). It's not likely that they're going to simply stop.

 

Maybe they have a history, but they're not repeating history right now. I have yet to see anything within the past couple of years. Before, it was one after another and now its nothing. Hardware bumps don't keep you in front. 

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post #88 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyhab27 View Post

... The changes that need to come to the iPhone (to name just a few) are true multitasking (double clicking on the home screen and flipping between apps is not considered 'true' multitasking), a better native email experience (there is a reason why iPhone users were jumping over each other in order to get a third party email app - Mailbox), a more intelligent predictive keyboard experience, and find an alternative to constantly having to use the home button - this is probably my biggest gripe.   

 

Lets stop beating around the bush. The primary reason why Apple does not want to re-write iOS is because the app catalog will reset to zero.  From my limited knowledge of phone technology, I dont believe you can just add multitasking capabilities to the current OS. 

 

The current OS already has "true multitasking" capabilities, so they don't need to be added, nor would enabling user app multitasking in any way cause, "the app catalog to reset to zero." Let's not beat around the bush, you're talking complete nonsense.

post #89 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post

Could you please provide some specific examples over the last 10 years of a Microsoft OS that has been reskinned every year so that Microsoft can justify its outrageous upgrade cost?  Windows Phone upgrades have come for free (but who cares), XBox upgrades have come for free, and Microsoft Windows has only had three releases over the last 10 years ("Windows Vista" in 2006, "Windows 7" in 2009, and "Windows 8" in 2012). 

 

Windows Vista

Windows 7

Windows 8

post #90 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevt View Post

 

... the resemblance to Palm OS launchers would make even a Samsung lawyer blush. 

post #91 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

People are always throwing out this idea that the iOS interface is "dated" or "stale" but they all have two things in common.

 

1) They can never actually say what specifically about it is "outdated" or what they would change.

 

2) Those that say it are almost always competitors.  

I would like to see widgets....

I would also like to see the ability to block caller's numbers

that just off the top of my head.....

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post #92 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

...

 

For example, is it truly categorically better to have one physical button that performs multiple roles, or to have separate buttons for each role?   The simplicity of Apple's single button is certainly attractive at first glance, but if you watch new users many get to Settings easily enough when setting up their device for the first time, but have difficulty understanding that they need to use that one button to return to the Home screen.   And while that one button sometimes takes you Home, at other times it works more like a Back button, and sometimes does something else. 

 

This ambiguity is avoided by having multiple buttons, each with its own distinct purpose.  I don't know of any formal usability studies that have been doing which might "prove" one is better than the other, but personally I think it's fine that users can choose whichever they're more comfortable with.

 

...

 

I have to call you on this one.  This is completely made-up BS on your part and you know it.  

 

This is your opinion, being phrased as if it were some kind of fact complete with fake references to "studies" and situations that simply aren't true.  

 

Yes, the single home button is actually better than multiple buttons. Both general UI theory and multiple studies prove it without a doubt.  The whole point of the home button is that users do not "get lost" and do not have difficulty understanding that pressing it will return them to the Home screen.  That's the reason why it's superior.  

 

The Home button also does not do different things in different contexts, that is actually the main criticism of the multiple buttons in Android, specifically Android's "back" button. 

post #93 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

The big UI upgrade was supposed to be Siri, but that is still in alpha, as far as I can tell. Anyway, tacking on features is not a UI update, but notice that Apple has claimed (with some justification) that they are not making bigger displays because that would be incompatible with the current UI. Since people WANT bigger displays, the UI should be updated to make using them fluid.

 

There's not really any evidence that indicates people generally want big displays. But, supposing, for the sake of argument, there were, what exactly about the current UI wouldn't be, to use your term, "fluid" on a larger display?

post #94 of 264
From the company that didn't think people wanted phones with touch screens and that is still making phones with physical keyboards.

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post #95 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

 

Maybe they have a history, but they're not repeating history right now. I have yet to see anything within the past couple of years. Before, it was one after another and now its nothing. Hardware bumps don't keep you in front. 

When was this magical time when Apple was a non-stop station of innovation, significantly moreso than they are today?  Name the period and the products please.

 

The Retina MacBook Pro is an entirely new form factor of notebook and was delivered as a full product line within the last year

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post #96 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I have to call you on this one.  This is completely made-up BS on your part and you know it.  

 

This is your opinion, being phrased as if it were some kind of fact complete with fake references to "studies" and situations that simply aren't true.  

 

Yes, the single home button is actually better than multiple buttons. Both general UI theory and multiple studies prove it without a doubt.  The whole point of the home button is that users do not "get lost" and do not have difficulty understanding that pressing it will return them to the Home screen.  That's the reason why it's superior.  

 

The Home button also does not do different things in different contexts, that is actually the main criticism of the multiple buttons in Android, specifically Android's "back" button. 

 

What? The Android back button goes back one screen. The home button goes home. That's not hard.

 

I've seen first hand confusion with the home button. My mom could never figure out why Siri would open or the recent apps screen would open sometimes when she wanted to go to the home. She also had a lot of trouble finding the back button on iOS and usually ended up going home and starting over. That part of iOS can be inconsistent. Sometimes you really can't go back to the previous screen.

post #97 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

 

 

You can still refresh the interface without making changes, or making it hard to use. I didn't say just make it look completely different. Of course that would be stupid. My OS X example was what I was going for. The interface looks the same, but it UI has been updated a few times to keep it current. You can do both without losing people. 

 

BTW...I like how you immediately went for the iOS vs Android thing. Very nice...

 

so change for change sake is what you are looking for?  Again, Apple is not Microsoft or Google.  The iOS GUI has been evolving. Again, what specifically are you looking for?   The GUI works and works well.

post #98 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by geekdad View Post

I would like to see widgets....

I would also like to see the ability to block caller's numbers

that just off the top of my head.....

 

I would love to be able to block numbers but that's the carrier that's stopping you from doing that, not Apple.  

 

My biggest wish (besides more user control over settings) would be that Apple actually tried to do something about the carriers and their immoral anti-customer ways. When the first iPhone came out (and for a long period before when we were hoping), there was this belief that Apple was going to change everything and put the carriers in the "back seat" sort of speak in favour of the customer and giving the customer control over their communications and a fair market deal.  

 

This has not only not happened, Apple has fallen back to a degree and seems to have no intention of upsetting any carrier anywhere on earth.  

 

I'd like to see a phone app in the iPad for instance, which would be the beginning of the end for the carriers and one thing they could do that would truly deserve the "innovative" moniker, but it will never happen until Apple gets some balls.   

 

Considering Apple is led almost exclusively by ageing white dudes who probably don't even have sex anymore I think this unlikely.  

post #99 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

... The simplicity of Apple's single button is certainly attractive at first glance, but if you watch new users many get to Settings easily enough when setting up their device for the first time, but have difficulty understanding that they need to use that one button to return to the Home screen.   And while that one button sometimes takes you Home, at other times it works more like a Back button ...

 

Exactly when, under what circumstances, does the iPhone Home button behave like a Back button?

 

No one, but possibly you, has any trouble understanding how the Home button works.

post #100 of 264

"History repeats itself again."? *Casey Stengel smiles.* Oh well, this guy isn't getting paid for correct grammar. 

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post #101 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by NexusPhan View Post

 

What? The Android back button goes back one screen. The home button goes home. That's not hard.

 

I've seen first hand confusion with the home button. My mom could never figure out why Siri would open or the recent apps screen would open sometimes when she wanted to go to the home. She also had a lot of trouble finding the back button on iOS and usually ended up going home and starting over. That part of iOS can be inconsistent. Sometimes you really can't go back to the previous screen.

 

Don't want to get in an argument over it but ... no.  

 

The Android back button is notorious for doing different things in different situations, there are lots of articles about it. Google it.   

The home button always has the same function (assuming that the user is simply pressing it in a normal way). 

 

Your mum is having problems because: 

 

- there is no "back button" in iOS for her to find, so either you or she is kind of "thinking wrong" on that one.  

- she seems to have difficulty pushing buttons (the difference between press and press and hold).  

post #102 of 264

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 9:33am
post #103 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I would love to be able to block numbers but that's the carrier that's stopping you from doing that, not Apple.  

 

My biggest wish (besides more user control over settings) would be that Apple actually tried to do something about the carriers and their immoral anti-customer ways. When the first iPhone came out (and for a long period before when we were hoping), there was this belief that Apple was going to change everything and put the carriers in the "back seat" sort of speak in favour of the customer and giving the customer control over their communications and a fair market deal.  

 

This has not only not happened, Apple has fallen back to a degree and seems to have no intention of upsetting any carrier anywhere on earth.  

 

I'd like to see a phone app in the iPad for instance, which would be the beginning of the end for the carriers and one thing they could do that would truly deserve the "innovative" moniker, but it will never happen until Apple gets some balls.   

 

Considering Apple is led almost exclusively by ageing white dudes who probably don't even have sex anymore I think this unlikely.  

almost made me spit my coffee all over my iMac..... :-)

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post #104 of 264

Right now I think the number one thing I'd love to see change in iOS -- and that I expect will never ever happen -- is having swappable 'home screens'.

 

In other words, let us replace Springboard or whatever it's called with something else.

 

 

So when you press the Home button, instead of going to Springboard, it would go to some other app that you've installed and made 'home' via settings. There'd be some API hook or requirement, eg. you could only set an App as 'home' if that app had the right functions to replace Springboard & launch other Apps. So you couldn't make some game or something Home, but purpose-built Springboard replacements would appear on the app store and people would have more options, and it would be IMHO a huge leap forward for iOS.

 

Out of the box, you have the familiar grid of icons, Springboard is still the default. But for those who want something different, it would be an option.

 

I could see 'home' apps that have widgets, 'home' apps that give you a calendar overview or to-do overview, weather, stocks, twitter feed, whatever, the possibilities are limitless. All they need is some way to launch the apps that isn't necessarily a grid of icons. 

 

This isn't a new idea. We could do this on the Newton. 

post #105 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

The home button always has the same function (assuming that the user is simply pressing it in a normal way). 

Not strictly true, it does have a bit of a learning curve.

 

Sure if you're in an app then a single press will always take you to Springboard, to the last page you viewed.  A second tap will take you to the first Springboard screen.  A third tap (or if you were already on the first Springboard screen) will take you to Spotlight.  A fourth tap will take you back to Springboard P1.

 

Two taps brings up multitasking wherever you are, and long tap brings up Siri wherever you are.

 

So there is a bit of context to it, and sometimes when the home button doesn't respond straight away (which it does occasionally) so you tap a little longer just to make sure it's registering and end up in Siri... yeah it can get a bit annoying having all those functions assigned to one button.

 

Not saying Android is better, quite the opposite, but every solution has its compromises.

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post #106 of 264

While I can always see room for improvement for iOS, I really don't get this "outdated" meme going around.  The main reason I chose the original iPhone was because it was dead simple to use as opposed to myriad menus (usually hiding even more menus).  I also chose an iPad because I knew it work the same (or similar) as my phone.  I have seen some pretty decent suggestions that would actually be fairly useful (like the accelerate to to bottom when scrolling) but some of the other stuff ("true multitasking") just seem like "Other are doing it!" mentality without any actual reasons that it's better.  I don't need my phone to do backflips.  I just need it to work and work quickly.
 

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post #107 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by JollyPaul View Post

 

He is a self serving d-bag with a valid point. The iOS interface is dated. I still have hope Apple has been working on something for the past few years and will surprise us this year. Letting another year goes by with a largely static iOS would be very damaging.

 

Yeah...apple is doomed if they do not copy the failed Windows Phone GUI or the horrible Android GUI.  Sales are plummeting right now.  If they do not introduce a 3d , tilt scrolling, eye tracking, flashing icons, changing backgrounds, see-thru, fart commanded UI, they are sure to die.

post #108 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Don't want to get in an argument over it but ... no.  

 

The Android back button is notorious for doing different things in different situations, there are lots of articles about it. Google it.   

The home button always has the same function (assuming that the user is simply pressing it in a normal way). 

 

Your mum is having problems because: 

 

- there is no "back button" in iOS for her to find, so either you or she is kind of "thinking wrong" on that one.  

- she seems to have difficulty pushing buttons (the difference between press and press and hold).  

 

 

Whats that button that shows up on some screens in the top left of the screen that says "back" then?

 

I've used Android for about 18 months now and never found a time where the back button didn't bring me back one screen. Maybe prior to Android 4.0, but I never used that.

 

I also hear Siri activated and immediately deactivated at least once per day in the office. It's a common problem. Maybe its an overused physical button or maybe Apple needs to change the timing slightly but it's most certainly an accident everyone makes.

post #109 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

 

Funny how these posts criticize iOS and demand changes yet fail to offer any concrete suggestions. "No sweeping changes... refresh the interface... new features" the poster laments. So bottom line, just change it for change's sake so we can say it's innovative? Well, we've now seen how this attitude works out with the Galaxy S4 loaded with features only a few geeks will use. But hey, it's 'change' so it must be good, right? To me the S4 has become the Microsoft Office of the smartphone market, bloated with features the average user doesn't even know about much less ever use. 

 

The continuing war rages between the tech types and the common user with Apple on the common user's side. Just take a peek at Andy Ihnatko's 6000 word geek manifesto on why he switched to Android and you'll see the contrasting ideologies. Meanwhile even the enterprise is opting for ease of use with iOS.

 

BINGO!  Could not have said it better.  I read a post where they want to see weather on the lock screen?  That's Innovation?  I read another post where one talked about MS Tiles and BB Hub...  but aren't those OSes coded to differentiate themselves from Apple, why require Apple to become more Microsoftian or BlackBerry-like for changes sake?  Why not just get a Windows 8 or BlackBerry10 phone?  I get it, you open the iPhone and all you see are little squares of apps that give the iPhone a wealth of functionality.  B O R I N G....  Never mind that the casing design and materials used has changed multiple times since the iPhone introduction but those darn little squares, bleeeech!  But it's simple and it works, but it's so 2007 and you want a new look that's commensurate in the year 2525...  Uh-oh, I feel a song coming...

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post #110 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I'd like to see a phone app in the iPad for instance, which would be the beginning of the end for the carriers and one thing they could do that would truly deserve the "innovative" moniker, but it will never happen until Apple gets some balls.   

 

I'd like to see a grander vision for Apple messaging services.  We have iMessage, we have Facetime, I think a TalkTime or iTalk integrated into the phone app (and a rebranding of the odd-wheel app) would fill out that offering, and would add even more value to the Apple ecosystem.

 

Viber does it already, but a native solution would carry much more weight.

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post #111 of 264

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Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 9:33am
post #112 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

While we are at it, it would be nice if the names of the applications were aware of the dictionary and localisation too so "Game Center" would show as the (more correct), "Game Centre" instead of having to stare at irritating mis-spellings all day.  

It's a proper noun not a misspelling or as you say mis-spelling.

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post #113 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

What is the difference between Swype and gesture typing, for the unenglightened among us?

 

Swype is a perpetually-in-beta-not-in-the-Play-Store keyboard app that does "gesture typing," i.e. you touch the screen and move from letter to letter to form words. The Note 2 stock keyboard had gesture typing like Swype, but it worked much better (in my experience).

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post #114 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Retina was quite a big advance in user interface.

Retina is not a UI, its a display technology. That's like saying a new monitor is part of a UI and incorrect.

post #115 of 264

I'm sure Alicia Keys will have some pretty innovative UI updates for us soon as well... ;)

post #116 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefish86 View Post

This.

 

An overhaul would be a huge mistake, but they've been sitting still for too long.

 

Everyone keeps asking what Apple could improve:

  1. Home screen. It works fine for <50 apps, but when you're up to 200+ it gets really clumsy. You either put in constant effort to keep it rationally sorted (folder size limit and lack of nested folders means re-categorizing as apps get added and deleted), or end up with 8+ unorganized screens like my wife.
  2. Multi-tasking. Which apps are still running? What if there's an app I want to keep running, and others I want killed immediately? Automatic management is great, but the ability to give manual hints would be fantastic. Yes you can manually kill an app but its SLOW to get to. What about a fast way to flick back and forth between a pair of apps rapidly? Currently the double-press on home is really cumbersome. Gestures on the iPad are great but the iPhone needs a parallel.
  3. Rapid access to settings. Ie toggles for bluetooth, wifi, tethering, airplane mode, airplay etc... This has been something people have wanted forever.
  4. Document management. The current system works for now, but it's already starting to get unwieldly. You have to go into the app that "owns" the document, and count on that app to give you a (sometimes very long) list of other apps to open it in. Then each app has its own copy, and you have to remember which is newest. There is no way of picking a default app to handle a document type.

 

How could these things be improved? (not all ideas are compatible with each other)

 

Home screen

  • Add a section (ie half a page, or even a full page) that gets automatically populated with the most used apps, not the most recent apps.
  • Make the far-right page be all your apps in an automatically-categorized list. Make it so that apps no longer have to live on other pages, this can be the only page they exist on for lesser-utilized apps.

 

Multi-tasking

  • Swipe up from the bottom to show the multi-tasking tray. Only show apps that are still running. Add a check to each app icon that means "try to keep me running at the expense of other apps". Change double-press home to "immediately quit the foreground app".
  • Allow interacting with the foreground app while the multi-tasking tray is still open on "tall" devices. All apps already support the shorter aspect ratio for legacy devices anyways.

 

Settings

  • Add a notification center widget for the main toggles.
  • Make a new splash-page for the main settings app that puts these settings front and center right away
  • Add a screen that can be popped up at any time without interrupting the current app with access to these toggles, perhaps launched from the multitasking tray or notification center.

 

Documents

  • Obviously security is a huge concern here, but you could implement an implied-consent system based on a system-controlled "open file" screen that only grants an app access to a document when a user picks it. Automatic versioning would limit the damage an app could do, since the user could always roll back the document. "Recent documents" for each app could be built into the open file screen, adding convenience while maintaining the consent system.
  • To keep user friendliness,  make it a document library sortable based on document type, name, date saved, saved by app etc... similar to the "Music" interface. No direct filesystem exposure to the user. Only documents openable by the app show up in that app's open dialog. Obviously there would be a master "Documents" app that allows the user to see them all, manage them and perform a "Open With..." and "Share" functions. Apps like Mail could use the same interface to pick attachments.

 

So don't say there's nothing Apple could improve.

 

1/. What percentage of Apple's customers have 200+ applications?

 

2/. What percentage of Apple's customers care which apps are running?

 

3/. What percentage of Apple's customers spend all day switching wifi, bluetooth, tethering, airplane mode etc.?

 

Actually, I'm going to stop there. Your list reads like someone who wants a desktop operating system running on a phone. You need to buy a PC and strap it to the side of your head.

post #117 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexmit View Post

Retina is not a UI, its a display technology. That's like saying a new monitor is part of a UI and incorrect.

Yes and no. Retina caused UI changes because the code that to be written for the 2X sizing and with images that needed to be 4x as large so that everything still "looked" the same, only crisper, but that is all an effect from the causal HW changes.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #118 of 264
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post
Not much as changed since the original iOS.


"Sure". But since the original iPhone OS? HA!


Except for Siri (which isn't a big deal to me), there really hasn't been anything earth shattering coming out of Apple these days.
 
***Waits to get lambasted for this post***

 

Well, when you say things like that, what in the world do you expect?


Originally Posted by wubbus View Post
…don't toe the line

 

It's not so much toeing the line that gets people attacked, it's toeing the lie'n.


Originally Posted by Selva Raj View Post
Just granted UI patent and more
LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01
and more is coming..
i can not tell u more that for secret reason

 

Looks terrible. I don't like it. I already see what can be done with it, and I don't like it. At all. Maybe I should make a mockup… 


Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

1) They can never actually say what specifically about it is "outdated" or what they would change.

 

2) Those that say it are almost always competitors.  

 

*nods*

 

Rules #28 and 31. 


Originally Posted by igriv View Post
The big UI upgrade was supposed to be Siri…

 


Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
From the company that didn't think people wanted phones with touch screens and that is still making phones with physical keyboards.

 

That's really all that needs said here. RIM can be given the benefit of the doubt only so far, then you have to start thinking about why they got where they are. 

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #119 of 264
I wonder how many of those using the "stale" or "outdated" meme have been:
  1. put on Ritalin or Adderall
  2. diagnosed with ADD
  3. diagnosed with a reading disability

It is also probably generational. Younger users are more easily bored, older users value their time more and want get more done than playing with their phones.

And it's cultural. There really is a geek class that likes to tinker with stuff. They are not, never have been, Apple's ideal customers. Naturally they have a minority presence here.
Edited by Flaneur - 3/18/13 at 9:12am
post #120 of 264
Quote:

Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

 

I know many here aren't fans of Widgets,  and its true that some Widgets can be written in unoptimized ways that can reduce battery life, which may be critically important for those who live in areas without ready access to electricity.

 

And I wouldn't say that supporting Widgets is necessarily better, but neither is disallowing them.

 

On Android, Widgets are a choice.  Currently, those who find them useful are required to choose something other than iOS, but I'd wager Apple will add support for something very much like Widgets by iOS 7, so those who don't want them can continue to not have them, but those who do will no longer be required to choose a non-Apple device.

 

Perhaps Apple thinks that if iOS has widgets, a lot of people will start using them and not make the connection between that and the worse battery life they get from their phone. Then they'd complain how the iPhone has such terrible battery life.

 

As it is, I still have to charge my iPhone pretty much every day, just like I've had to do with all the smartphones I've owned. When I can go 5 days without charging, then maybe I'll start considering widgets again. I stopped using them on Android when I saw what battery hogs they were.

2011 Macbook Pro, 2012 Macbook Air, iPhone 5, iPad 4

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2011 Macbook Pro, 2012 Macbook Air, iPhone 5, iPad 4

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