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Higher dividend viewed as 'safety net' that could help turn around Apple stock - Page 3

post #81 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

I am not sure I see the point of the above. No one is saying that the sky is falling, but merely that the current management is not, umm, managing the Apple franchise optimally.

How is being the most profitable company on the planet not optimal? That is the definition of optimal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

Why should they (the management) care that the stock is falling? Because if this go on much longer, the board will have no choice but to fire them -- remember, the board represents the SHAREHOLDERS.

You keep saying this but the interest of the board is primarily the health of the company as that is or should be the primary interest of the shareholders. The way you word it is that the board should put the interests of the shareholders before the company, which would suggest it's ok to drain the company's financial resources to give the shareholders a big payday. That's not what they are there to do.

It's not one or the other though, they have to do what's best for both and they already made a public statement about what they plan to do:

http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2013/02/07Statement-by-Apple.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

Again, remember: Apple was in a position of leadership twice before -- in the beginning, with the Apple II, and then in the mid-eighties, with the Mac, and they pissed it away both times doing the same thing as they are doing now: collecting fat margins and allowing more nimble competitors (which, amazingly, included IBM in 1981) to eat their lunch, and not being sufficiently innovative.

Again those words aren't accurate to describe what happened. When you say "more nimble", you mean sold at lower profits for a larger audience. Look at what's happening to Dell and HP. You could say Amazon is more nimble but do you want Apple to start churning out quarterly reports with revenues of billions and losses instead of profits? It's not in the best interests of shareholders to pursue loss-making business models.

How innovative do you think Samsung is with their S4?
post #82 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 
...Again, remember: Apple was in a position of leadership twice before -- in the beginning, with the Apple II, and then in the mid-eighties, with the Mac, and they pissed it away both times doing the same thing as they are doing now: collecting fat margins and allowing more nimble competitors (which, amazingly, included IBM in 1981) to eat their lunch, and not being sufficiently innovative.
 

Not the same situation, Apple started to produce a confusing product line and failed to sell many products. Ie they weren't making money. This situation, they have 70% of the mobile profits, a great majority of the tablet profits, and a good chunk of the PC profits. They can't make enough product to sell.

And they've innovated: it's been 3 yrs since the iPad was released. What have other companies done in those three years?

If you are so worried, sell and never come back.
post #83 of 86

No need to get so worked up.  I'm trying to join the discussion and perhaps learn something.  You've made some good points, but I'm still not so sure there isn't a middle ground somewhere between the Jobs approach and more openness.  (This is in reply to Tallest Skil post #100 of this thread.)

post #84 of 86
Originally Posted by insider7 View Post
…I'm still not so sure there isn't a middle ground somewhere between the Jobs approach and more openness.

 

They can be as open as they want businessly. Don't tell anyone squat about new products, though.

 

Also, you probably hit "Reply", didn't you? That does nothing. lol.gif You want "Quote" for quoting a specific post.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #85 of 86

Thanks for the tip.  I'll get the hang of it soon.


Edited by insider7 - 3/21/13 at 3:08pm
post #86 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

Your first paragraph is just plain wrong -- they have been cutting back on their supplier orders, so no, there is no problem keeping up with demand.

Your second paragraph: other companies have done plenty. I think if you compare an android phone of three years ago with a new one, you will see some differences. Even more true of windows phones, and BlackBerry phones. Amazon's Kindle Fire line did not exist then, and has a line of very nice devices now. Dropbox has grown immensely, and is far better than Apple's iCloud (yes, I know opinions vary). Spotify and XBOX live are taking market away from iTunes. I could go on.

As for your third paragrah, you apparently think that  "go **** yourself" is a valid debating tactic. I disagree.

1. Really, so you know their supply chain? Record number of iPhones sold. Couldn't keep up with demand; all from the earnings call.

2. The amazon kindle fire is a response to the iPad.
Why so many generalities? So what's so innovative about a larger screen for Android. If that's innovative, then surely the iPad mini is too. A stylus isn't innovative.
Windows phone is innovative because its not a copy of iOS.
Spotify and Xbox live market share? What's your source?
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