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Wacom debuts new Cintiq 13HD for artists, standalone tablet on the way

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Wacom, designer of premium digital art creation devices, announced on Tuesday a new entry in its Cintiq line of Mac- and PC-compatible drawing tablets, the Cintiq 13HD.

wacom


In addition to its 13-inch 1920x1080 HD LED display, the Cintiq 13HD features a built-in stand, allowing for adjusting the tablet to flat, 22?, 35?, and 50? angles. The 13HD is also compatible with both Macs and PCs, as with previous Wacom tablets, and it features customizable ExpressKeys and a Rocker Ring allowing for easy function navigation.

An integral aspect of the new tablet is its Pro Pen, a digitizer stylus with interchangeable nibs and 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity. Wacom's announcement of the device, though, contains little else in the way of details on the Pro Pen.

The 13HD joins the 22-inch 22HD, which Wacom released last year, as well as other offerings in the company's Cintiq Pen Display line such as the 24HD touch and 24HD.

While the 13HD requires attachment to a Mac or PC to function, Wacom has also confirmed that it is working on a mobile device. In February, on the company's Facebook page, a post confirmed that Wacom is developing a standalone portable device. Wacom didn't provide much in the way of details, but the company did say it is due out over the summer, and that it will release with "a real pressure-sensitive professional pen, smooth multi-touch, an HD display, and other valuable features that you haven't seen in other tablets."

The new Cintiq 13HD will sell directly from Wacom's online store, as well as through a number of select partners. The new device, scheduled to go on sale in the beginning of April, is listed at $1,000.
post #2 of 15
If Apple should buy any company, it's this one. And, take it to the next level.

Granted, it won't be easy, considering it's Japanese-owned.
post #3 of 15
Guess I'm confused...
If it requires a Mac or PC, then why does it have its own display?
I'm missing something here.
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Guess I'm confused...
If it requires a Mac or PC, then why does it have its own display?
I'm missing something here.

 

Because it's more awkward/less precise to draw on a blank slab while your strokes appear on a separate monitor.

 

Artists use this with Photoshop, Illustrator, and the like.

 

I use my iPad as "poor man's Cintiq" using DisplayPad (and there are others) which makes my iPad into a wireless second monitor. Drag a Photoshop window over there, and on a fast home WiFi network it's pretty good. Of course, having a real Wacom stylus would be much better*... but the app was a couple bucks, vs. the high cost of a Cintiq.

 

* I don't have a Jot Touch stylus for my iPad. (I worry about scratching the glass.) Sounds like that might come closer to Wacom functionality--but only with iPad apps. Not with Mac/PC apps--which is what a Cintiq is for.

post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Guess I'm confused...
If it requires a Mac or PC, then why does it have its own display?
I'm missing something here.

It doesn't run the software like Photoshop or Illustrator (edit: as pointed out above).

I'd like to see Apple allow the iPad to do this. I don't think it needs a pen or specialised function. It could really just detect movement above the surface (yes like the Galaxy S4, except not really poorly). Then you could use a pen or finger and have pressure sensitivity just by how far from the screen you move. The advantage with the contact is that a lift-off means you stop drawing but they can have a gesture to lift-off like touch finger and thumb to draw, separate to lift-off.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

I'd like to see Apple allow the iPad to do this. I don't think it needs a pen or specialised function. It could really just detect movement above the surface (yes like the Galaxy S4, except not really poorly). Then you could use a pen or finger and have pressure sensitivity just by how far from the screen you move. The advantage with the contact is that a lift-off means you stop drawing but they can have a gesture to lift-off like touch finger and thumb to draw, separate to lift-off.

 

It'd be better to do pressure sensitivity on iPad via the size of the contact with the surface when using something that "squishes" (like a fingertip or a soft tip stylus).  However, discerning multiple touches in a small area from a single high-pressure touch might be difficult.  Wacom only has to support a single pen making contact with their device.

 
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post #7 of 15

Very curious to see what Wacom comes up with for their standalone device. If it's not obscenely priced, I will be sorely tempted to go into debt and snag one. I would love something that can run Corel Painter, Illustrator, etc. with pressure-sensitivity. I've never been able to afford or justify a Cintiq, no matter how much I've lusted after them.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


It doesn't run the software like Photoshop or Illustrator (edit: as pointed out above).

I'd like to see Apple allow the iPad to do this. I don't think it needs a pen or specialised function. It could really just detect movement above the surface (yes like the Galaxy S4, except not really poorly). Then you could use a pen or finger and have pressure sensitivity just by how far from the screen you move. The advantage with the contact is that a lift-off means you stop drawing but they can have a gesture to lift-off like touch finger and thumb to draw, separate to lift-off.

I think the other advantage to the pen contact of the Cintiq is that your hand, wrist and arm have a tactile reference point in space that helps your brain process and perform precision movements.  A finger or hand floating above a detection surface or zone is always going to have slight shake and unintended movement which would reduce the precision.  As you say, it would be cool to see this with iPad though.

post #9 of 15

Looks like a big improvement over the 12wx for roughly the same price. Very nice.

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Guess I'm confused...
If it requires a Mac or PC, then why does it have its own display?
I'm missing something here.

It's just easier to use than having your hand on a tablet while staring at a display in front of you and watching the cursor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


It doesn't run the software like Photoshop or Illustrator (edit: as pointed out above).

I'd like to see Apple allow the iPad to do this. I don't think it needs a pen or specialised function. It could really just detect movement above the surface (yes like the Galaxy S4, except not really poorly). Then you could use a pen or finger and have pressure sensitivity just by how far from the screen you move. The advantage with the contact is that a lift-off means you stop drawing but they can have a gesture to lift-off like touch finger and thumb to draw, separate to lift-off.

You can use them for far more than that. The movement is much more natural for anything that requires fine control based on anything visual. Cintiqs also alleviate the issue of scaled cursor movement. Instead it's just point to point on a tablet with extremely high resolution.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsullivan View Post

Looks like a big improvement over the 12wx for roughly the same price. Very nice.


It may be. I'll reserve judgement for now, given the number of subtle design flaws in the past several generations. The other problem being if you do have a problem, warranty or out of warranty service takes forever, so you might as well just buy another. I'm also curious how the finish wears. I used to replace overlays at least once a year while they were still replaceable. The other annoying thing would be their usb cords. The last couple used replaceable cords, but the connection was poorly soldered. The intuos3 prior to that had a tendency to pinch the cord where it connected to the tablet. That model also lacked a user replaceable cord. The complaint that I always read about the Cintiqs that kept me from buying one was the issue of dead pixels and lack of a screen overlay. I always end up with uneven wear, which is really irritating.

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post

 

It'd be better to do pressure sensitivity on iPad via the size of the contact with the surface when using something that "squishes" (like a fingertip or a soft tip stylus).  However, discerning multiple touches in a small area from a single high-pressure touch might be difficult.  Wacom only has to support a single pen making contact with their device.

Wacom does support multitouch in their cintiq 24HD touch, which is their high-end professional tablet. These tables are very good. They are tablets used with Industry Art Production Software, both 2D like Photoshop, Illustrator etc. or 3D like MAYA, Z-Brush etc. That they are releasing a small tablet like this seems odd, but they have never played in the consumer space and likely won't succeed. 

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by reasonableGuy View Post

That they are releasing a small tablet like this seems odd, but they have never played in the consumer space and likely won't succeed. 


They have played in the consumer space for years. Bamboo products and the 12wx were definitely geared towards consumers and prosumers, and even the Intuos find a nice middle ground. Seems like those lines are still going strong, though the 12wx always seemed like a failure. I was DYING to get my hands on a cintiq and when they finally released the $1000 one it was pretty substandard. This looks SO much better to me. Can't wait to see reviews. Also can't wait to see what Wacom does with their tablet because they know they are targeting artists with it.
 
I do wish Apple would make an iPad geared towards artists. Maybe a bit LARGER actually and with Wacom-style drawing tech a non-glass surface or some other way to simulate a more natural pen feeling.

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsullivan View Post


They have played in the consumer space for years. Bamboo products and the 12wx were definitely geared towards consumers and prosumers, and even the Intuos find a nice middle ground. Seems like those lines are still going strong, though the 12wx always seemed like a failure. I was DYING to get my hands on a cintiq and when they finally released the $1000 one it was pretty substandard. This looks SO much better to me. Can't wait to see reviews. Also can't wait to see what Wacom does with their tablet because they know they are targeting artists with it.
 
I do wish Apple would make an iPad geared towards artists. Maybe a bit LARGER actually and with Wacom-style drawing tech a non-glass surface or some other way to simulate a more natural pen feeling.

Yes your right. Being in the industry I have never taken the Bamboo that seriously. They are very niche consumer products. Prosumers is a nice description. Whatever happens, I would want to be able to run professional software or it would be a non-starter for me. This could be a good product! although I would prefer bigger. Cheers.  

post #14 of 15

I don't want to sound argumentative but the niche products are probably the high-end ones. Judging from Amazon review numbers for instance, Bamboo tablets have close to 10 times as many reviews as any of the Intuos tablets. The volume sales likely come from the consumer devices (I'm guessing most profit comes from the high end). Drawing is a skill used non-professionally in many areas: Note taking, planning, story boarding,  personal hobby, etc. All of those uses benefit from digital vs. traditional media and having a product that matches those markets makes sense to me, at least.

 

Anyway, I'd love to have a digital sketchbook. An iPad could EASILY be that with a little tweaking. It's interesting to see that there is some Wacom competition emerging via UC Logic digitizers including cintiq competition. Hard to beat the Wacom tech though.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

I think the other advantage to the pen contact of the Cintiq is that your hand, wrist and arm have a tactile reference point in space that helps your brain process and perform precision movements.  A finger or hand floating above a detection surface or zone is always going to have slight shake and unintended movement which would reduce the precision.  As you say, it would be cool to see this with iPad though.

They should be able to do it with a pen too. I always thought they could just have a pen with a spring-loaded tip. If it was up to the pen to do the pressure sensing, it would need charged and there might be some latency in sending the data to the pad but perhaps there's a way to track the pen movement from the pad or even an add-on device. So you might clip something on the lightning port of the iPad and it detects position, angle and depth of the pen (which would be little more than a plastic stick) via infrared like LEAP Motion to an accuracy of 100th of a mm so they could do 200 levels of pressure with just a 2mm spring depth. It wouldn't need any special display on the iPad. It doesn't match the 2048 levels of pressure on the Wacom but it won't make that much practical difference. The software can interpolate pressure changes if it has to. As long as it could get round any occlusion of your hand, it should work ok - it might need a sensor on both sides of the pad.
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