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Apple looks to protect dropped iPhones by shifting their orientation mid-flight - Page 2

post #41 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Adding weight and complexity, while increasing the volume a device would otherwise have if it didn't have such features doesn't sound like Apple.

I guess it was good for them to file it, maybe the technology to make this practical will be available before the patent expires.

That was my thinking, too. Add to that weight and complexity increasing the force that is applied when it does land the complexity and additional moving components adds to more things can go wrong makes it all seem like a 1 step forward and 10 steps backward solution.

… unless Apple is actually making robotic pets for the future. Then it makes perfect sense.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #42 of 90

They should deploy a parachute and pop out fins.

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post #43 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Well, assuming this patent isn't just a joke, it really has nothing to do with iPhones.  It's all quite ridiculous relative to current devices and none of it is even possible given current constraints.  It seems to me that they are just trying to patent the idea first so that in 2056 when someone actually figures out how to make a device sprout wings to stop it's fall that they can point ot this and say "look! we thought of this first!"  

 

Personally, I'm not sure it was worth the money Apple paid to submit the patent, but they submit so many they probably thought it negligible.  

 

It reminds me of all those patents in the 1940's for rocket propelled ... everything, when rockets were clearly the future, but before anyone could actually build a reliable one.  The inventor would essentially put "rocket goes here" in the drawings even though at the time they couldn't be built.  

 

Say what? The motor in the iPhone is already strong enough to move the phone about on its axis when it's resting on a desktop (the App Cyclroramic I mentioned). In mid-air, with no friction from resting on a surface, it would be able to move even quicker. This is not future tech - this can be done right now.

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

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Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

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post #44 of 90

Wait till you see the patent for anti-gravity.

post #45 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

They should deploy a parachute and pop out fins.

 

That would be Samsung's response.

post #46 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Well, assuming this patent isn't just a joke, it really has nothing to do with iPhones.  It's all quite ridiculous relative to current devices and none of it is even possible given current constraints.  It seems to me that they are just trying to patent the idea first so that in 2056 when someone actually figures out how to make a device sprout wings to stop it's fall that they can point ot this and say "look! we thought of this first!"  

Personally, I'm not sure it was worth the money Apple paid to submit the patent, but they submit so many they probably thought it negligible.  

It reminds me of all those patents in the 1940's for rocket propelled ... everything, when rockets were clearly the future, but before anyone could actually build a reliable one.  The inventor would essentially put "rocket goes here" in the drawings even though at the time they couldn't be built.  


Now Apple is going to sit back and laugh their balls off as Samsung wastes millions try to copy this crap.
post #47 of 90
What ... No airbag? Worked on Mars! Tiny deployable parachute?
post #48 of 90
Hey - starwars worked for Reagan, USSR gave up trying to keep up with vaporware defense hoax
post #49 of 90
Better off add wings so if i drop my phone it just fly.
Great work apple.
post #50 of 90

Analysts, pundits, and journalists will start punishing Apple's stock price if this technology isn't a rumored feature for the rumored iPhone 5S. 

 

"Apple needs to follow through on every pie-in-the-sky patent application we uncover," said pundit Ricardo Cabeça. 

post #51 of 90
So complicated. You just need some sort of shock-absorbing frame, for example bezels around the front and back surfaces of the device, to pop up and out then you don't need to worry which side hits the ground first.
post #52 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by jguther View Post

<...>

 

So, if anything, the iPhone would have to be made from a SOFTER material. Unfortunately this is not a solution, because of asthetics and wear. 

 

 

Well, Dali showed us how it could look like for watches, didn't he ? I like the idea of a totally flexible iPhone ...

post #53 of 90
jonshf do you really need to be reminded that air friction is a negligible effect with falling bodies that are solids like a phone or a rock? Galileo proved that over 500 years ago dropping rocks off the tower at Pisa. The force of impact will change, but not the acceleration by gravity which remains constant. All this device will do is estimate the rate of rotation and attempt to make the phone land on its side rather than it's face. To work it would need some estimate of how high up in the air the phone is located. I assume an estimate will work for most cases. So don't try and drop your phone off a building to see what will happen unless you have insurance.
post #54 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plagen View Post

Just spread some butter over the side opposite to the fragile one lol.gif


Found just last night (by accident, if one believes there are any) on an archive from a 1988 Text BB - sent to me by a non-geek friend (or I never would've keyed in on the irony's source):
 

Law of Selective Gravity(The Buttered Side Down Law):

    An object will fall so as to do the most damage.

 

Law of the Perversity of Nature:(Mrs. Murphy's Corollary)

    You cannot successfully determine beforehand which side of

    the bread to butter.

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #55 of 90
Seems pretty out there to me. Added weight is clearly the biggest issue. I can think of several ways to break a fall, but all involve a lot of added weight. Seems like one of the more speculative patents that Apple takes just to CYA in the distant future.

How about if the current metal rim becomes an airbag for instance? Like a bumper case on steroids.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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post #56 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

Say what? The motor in the iPhone is already strong enough to move the phone about on its axis when it's resting on a desktop (the App Cyclroramic I mentioned). In mid-air, with no friction from resting on a surface, it would be able to move even quicker. This is not future tech - this can be done right now.

 

I don't see how.  

 

A weighted plunger inside the device (the most practical method mentioned) would take up half the phone if it had enough weight to seriously shift the device orientation in mid flight.  The other suggestions (growing wings, etc.) are just silly for the time being.  It reminds me of all that transforming suit crap in the Iron Man movies.  None of that is possible in the real world.  At all.  It's just CGI.  

post #57 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtdunham View Post

"A propulsion mechanism, such as a gas canister...."

Pepper spray. Cut way down on snatch-and-grab iphone thefts.

 

You can already buy an iPhone case with a built in Pepper spray so someone stole your idea! :)

post #58 of 90

Dunno if anyone posted this already, but a flexible display, whenever implemented, definitely wont be made of glass or crystal. It would be plastic.

Make a clear, plastic, scratch-proof/resistant front front for such a display, and people wont even know the difference. That would be definitely possible in the near future, with Samsung already showing them at CES 2013.

That should make displays crack-free.

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post #59 of 90
Hmm. An easier method is to give everyone an iPhone lanyard.
post #60 of 90

I got it now. Apple is making a Transformer iPhone. iPrime.

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post #61 of 90

Gives new meaning to the word "flip" phone.

post #62 of 90

Coolest innovation in gadgets for years IMO.  This is so Apple.  Jobs would be proud.

post #63 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I don't see how.  

 

A weighted plunger inside the device (the most practical method mentioned) would take up half the phone if it had enough weight to seriously shift the device orientation in mid flight.  The other suggestions (growing wings, etc.) are just silly for the time being.  It reminds me of all that transforming suit crap in the Iron Man movies.  None of that is possible in the real world.  At all.  It's just CGI.  

Mass is only one part of the momentum equation.  

 

This is totally possible, although you're right that it would take up significant space (but not half according to the patent drawings).  Good thing components keep getting smaller.

post #64 of 90
People who bring up liquidmetal in these threads remind me of 9/11 conspiracy theorists mentioning thermite.
post #65 of 90
Originally Posted by Tim Shundo View Post
People who bring up liquidmetal in these threads remind me of 9/11 conspiracy theorists mentioning thermite.

 

Why, do you not believe it exists? lol.gif

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #66 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrispoe View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

What physics program did you graduate from? Newton would be shocked to hear that force = mass x speed squared.


Would you have preferred i said the kinetic energy would be equal tohalfmass multiplied by speed squared.

EDIT
I still think more people would understand the way i said it the first time though

Acceleration is not speed squared, you are confused.
post #67 of 90
Every corpus is falling with the same speed, independently of it's weight.
post #68 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

For a device of this size, that's so negligible as to be pointless to measure.

 

Not if you drop it from an airplane! 1smile.gif

 

Unless the airplane is on the ground. Then yeah, you're right.

post #69 of 90

The Americans design a phone with GPS, accelerometers, gyroscopes and motors to position the device for minimum damage on impact.

 

The Koreans just make the phone out of rubber.

post #70 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

The Americans design a phone with GPS, accelerometers, gyroscopes and motors to position the device for minimum damage on impact.

 

The Koreans just make the phone out of rubber.


Rubber, yeah :) Check out those rubber-bordered phones Nokia makes for the low-end segment in India. Those phones are practically unbreakable in a fall, or even if you throw them.

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post #71 of 90
If other manufacturers have a mil spec 810 phones, why not apple?
post #72 of 90
Originally Posted by bleh1234 View Post
If other manufacturers have a mil spec 810 phones, why not apple?


Because they'd rather make things that look good and save the crap design for third-party cases.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #73 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macnewsjunkie View Post

jonshf do you really need to be reminded that air friction is a negligible effect with falling bodies that are solids like a phone or a rock? Galileo proved that over 500 years ago dropping rocks off the tower at Pisa. The force of impact will change, but not the acceleration by gravity which remains constant. All this device will do is estimate the rate of rotation and attempt to make the phone land on its side rather than it's face. To work it would need some estimate of how high up in the air the phone is located. I assume an estimate will work for most cases. So don't try and drop your phone off a building to see what will happen unless you have insurance.

  

You are both right and wrong. Air resistance is negligible over a short fall. But for long falls the object will reach what is called a terminal velocity. Where the force of air resistance is equal to the force of gravity. 

 

Even a bullet has a terminal velocity which is much slower than the rate at which it was fired. By your argument, the bullet would accelerate forever (wrong). I am not sure if you have ever studied drag but the drag force is not linear. Basically, the faster you go, your drag increases much faster.  So if the drag force is a pound for 10 ft/s. it may be 2.8 for 20ft/s.   Make sense?

 

However, for a fall of 10 feet, it can be ignored. Maybe I am getting technical but if you are going to call someone out, you will have to be specific.

post #74 of 90

Just make it as light as a feather and it will drift slowly to the ground when dropped.

post #75 of 90
Gee, if Apple we ever to create a device that reverses itself in free fall, that would be cool. Instead of hitting the ground, it would snap back up like a yoyo without a string. That would be inovation.
post #76 of 90

Attach a string to the phone, it would do the same thing. Wait.....create a way to do it without the string. Snap back like a YOYO. That would be cool. maybe if they started working on that now, the stock price would jump. After all, They are Apple and all is possible righty?

post #77 of 90
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post #78 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by broadbean View Post

Isn't it a tad early for April Fool's?

Why are there so many posts after this one?

post #79 of 90
With Apples trend toward making devices lighter and thinner, a dropped i-device will simply float to the ground. No harm done!
post #80 of 90
sweet a jet powered iPhone that can land itself!!
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