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Apple's iCloud is most-used cloud service in the US, beating Dropbox & Amazon

post #1 of 90
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With support built into every Mac and iOS device, Apple's iCloud is the most-used cloud media service by U.S. consumers, a new survey has found.

Cloud
Strategy Analytics graphic via Engadget.


iCloud accounts for 27 percent of cloud customers in America, according to new data published Thursday by Strategy Analytics. That places Apple's service ahead of second-place Dropbox, with 17 percent, and third-place Amazon, with 15 percent.

Apple's rival Google comes in fourth with its Google Drive service, used by 10 percent of U.S. consumers. And in fifth is the cloud movie service Ultraviolet, used by just 4 percent of respondents.

The survey of 2,300 people found that cloud storage is particularly popular among people ages 20 to 24, and the most common use for cloud storage is music. Of those surveyed, 90 percent of iCLoud, Amazon and Google Drive users store music files in the cloud.

The story is different with Dropbox users, as 45 percent of them use the service to store music files.

"Music is currently the key battleground in the war for cloud domination," said Ed Barton, director of Digital Media at Strategy Analytics. "Google is tempting users by giving away free storage for 20,000 songs which can be streamed to any Android device, a feature both Amazon and Apple charge annual subscriptions for.

"However, the growth of video streaming and the desire to access content via a growing range of devices will see services such as the Hollywood-backed digital movie initiative Ultraviolet ? currently used by 4% of Americans ? increase market share."

In its quarterly earnings report in January, Apple revealed that it has more than 250 million active iCloud users, growing significantly from 190 million in October. Users are automatically prompted to open a free iCloud account with 5 gigabytes of storage when setting up a new iOS device.
post #2 of 90
Doesn't surprise me!
post #3 of 90

"Why should we trust them? These're the guys that gave us MobileMe!"

Originally posted by Marvin

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post #4 of 90

I wonder how many people use iCloud without realizing it. It is so integrated and once you have signed up to iTunes Match, it's just there... iCloud also backs up devices with no interaction. Photostream is also so transparent the fact that it uses iCloud may not be obvious to many people.

post #5 of 90
A lot of iOS users don't even realize they're using iCloud..
post #6 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

A lot of iOS users don't even realize they're using iCloud..

 

 

Which is why it's so damn brilliant. 

post #7 of 90
This report is so slanted its not funny. iCloud is a defacto product that any iOS device needs just to sync your contacts, calendar, bookmarks etc. In fact the only reason I have mine turned on is because Google turned off syncing contacts, calendar, etc on my iPhone otherwise I wouldn't even bother with it.

This is right up there with the comments about Google numbers being overstated because anyone who signs up for gmail gets a Google account as well, which by comparison if you have a Facebook account they turn off all other email addresses and set you up with a facebook email address so they can claim they have a huge email client base.

Its all bogus and skewed numbers.

Now if Apple and Google would allow iOS users to sync contacts, calendar and email without iCloud which is what it SHOULD be then I would not need iCloud at all.
post #8 of 90
Originally Posted by RaptorOO7 View Post
iCloud is a defacto product that any iOS device needs just to sync your contacts, calendar, bookmarks etc.

 

Utterly incorrect.


Now if Apple and Google would allow iOS users to sync contacts, calendar and email without iCloud which is what it SHOULD be then I would not need iCloud at all.

 

Stop with the FUD. Now.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #9 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaptorOO7 View Post

This report is so slanted its not funny. iCloud is a defacto product that any iOS device needs just to sync your contacts, calendar, bookmarks etc. In fact the only reason I have mine turned on is because Google turned off syncing contacts, calendar, etc on my iPhone otherwise I wouldn't even bother with it.

This is right up there with the comments about Google numbers being overstated because anyone who signs up for gmail gets a Google account as well, which by comparison if you have a Facebook account they turn off all other email addresses and set you up with a facebook email address so they can claim they have a huge email client base.

Its all bogus and skewed numbers.

Now if Apple and Google would allow iOS users to sync contacts, calendar and email without iCloud which is what it SHOULD be then I would not need iCloud at all.

Well, your experience is not the same as mine. My wife and I both using iClouds back up and it did stellar job transfer all her datas from iPad 2 to iPad mini. We couldn't care less about Google Contact or Calendar because we deleted those once we get iClouds. And for gmail, we're still syncing it thru Exchange. 

post #10 of 90

Wow. iCloud's share is about the same as Amazon + Google + Samsung combined. Yet, when you hear 'cloud' in the media, Apple's name is rarely mentioned.

 

iCloud is solid, but Apple can improve its functionality and use substantially if they would: (i) dramatically increase available storage (for a price, of course); (ii) allow all of a user's data/files to be stored, so that one can jettison services like Dropbox. I have a feeling that (i) will happen when the data centers are fully up and running, but I am not so sure about (ii).

post #11 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaptorOO7 View Post

This report is so slanted its not funny. iCloud is a defacto product that any iOS device needs just to sync your contacts, calendar, bookmarks etc. In fact the only reason I have mine turned on is because Google turned off syncing contacts, calendar, etc on my iPhone otherwise I wouldn't even bother with it....

 

I think you're completely wrong on this.  The article implies that people were *asked* which service they used.  Therefore the base assumption should be that those who use it for things like you describe are actually not aware they are "using iCloud".  The numbers therefore aren't necessarily skewed in the way you suggest. 

post #12 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

A lot of iOS users don't even realize they're using iCloud..

 

 

Which is why it's so damn brilliant. 

Lots of Mac users are also on Dropbox and Google drive because iCould won't store files.

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post #13 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaptorOO7 View Post

This report is so slanted its not funny. iCloud is a defacto product that any iOS device needs just to sync your contacts, calendar, bookmarks etc. In fact the only reason I have mine turned on is because Google turned off syncing contacts, calendar, etc on my iPhone otherwise I wouldn't even bother with it.

This is right up there with the comments about Google numbers being overstated because anyone who signs up for gmail gets a Google account as well, which by comparison if you have a Facebook account they turn off all other email addresses and set you up with a facebook email address so they can claim they have a huge email client base.

Its all bogus and skewed numbers.

Now if Apple and Google would allow iOS users to sync contacts, calendar and email without iCloud which is what it SHOULD be then I would not need iCloud at all.

Schmidt, go home, you are drunk (still).

post #14 of 90
So it's a survey of people 20-24 year olds. Pretty limited.

45% of them use Dropbox to store their music.......

That should read:

45% of them use Dropbox to shre their music with their friends.

On another note.....

I'm always surprised by the ignorance when "journalists" speak of Apple's struggle with Web Services.

Apple had email before Google. Apple had iDisk (2000) years before Dropbox, Google Drive, and MS's drive.

Apple had bookmark and address book syncing years before any of the other providers except maybe AOL. (I think these came out around 2003 with OS 10.3?)

While some people had issues with MobileMe and iCloud, it wasn't the majority.

I've had Apple .Mac email and other services starting on January 5th, 2000 without any issues whatsoever.
post #15 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

I wonder how many people use iCloud without realizing it. It is so integrated and once you have signed up to iTunes Match, it's just there... iCloud also backs up devices with no interaction. Photostream is also so transparent the fact that it uses iCloud may not be obvious to many people.

You have to pay for iTunes Match so none on that count.

 

but you suggest another question. How much of that music in the cloud is simply because they bought from the store and can redownload. Rather than active sign ups like iTunes Match.

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #16 of 90
While this seems highly likely for the reasons others stated above I do find Dropbox more indispensable because I can actively save files and share them with others. I hope they bring this feature back with a modern version of iDisk.


Here is what Apple states is under the charge of iCloud. I bet even many posters here couldn't have named them all. Did you remember Find My Friends, Reading Lists, and iCloud Tabs? I didn't.




iMessages isn't even there and that's probably the most common and active way people iCloud.

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post #17 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Wow. iCloud's share is about the same as Amazon + Google + Samsung combined. Yet, when you hear 'cloud' in the media, Apple's name is rarely mentioned.

 

iCloud is solid, but Apple can improve its functionality and use substantially if they would: (i) dramatically increase available storage (for a price, of course); (ii) allow all of a user's data/files to be stored, so that one can jettison services like Dropbox. I have a feeling that (i) will happen when the data centers are fully up and running, but I am not so sure about (ii).

 

Agreed.  Although I think a much better measure would be the amount of storage space each service actually has in use and the traffic to and fro the servers instead of simply the numbers of folks who like to use it.  

 

My biggest beef with iCloud is only that half of the best apps you can get for iOS are made by douchebag hipsters who only code for DropBox because they think it's "better."  One thing iCloud apparently isn't (in the minds of these little shits), is "cool."  

 

As you can probably tell, that kind of arrogance kind of bugs me.  1smile.gif

post #18 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaptorOO7 View Post

This report is so slanted its not funny. iCloud is a defacto product that any iOS device needs just to sync your contacts, calendar, bookmarks etc. In fact the only reason I have mine turned on is because Google turned off syncing contacts, calendar, etc on my iPhone otherwise I wouldn't even bother with it.
 

 

Plug in your iPhone to a computer, fire up iTunes, select 'sync contacts' and apply. No iCloud needed.

 

 

also google didn't turn off anything, they just changed the mechanics. Google and you'll find the new method. 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #19 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

You have to pay for iTunes Match so none on that count.

It doesn't count as a service that anyone that uses iCloud uses but it counts as falling under the iCloud umbrella. Think of it as a cloud-based in-app purchase.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #20 of 90
There is a bit of Apples v. Oranges here. Most (all?) of Apple's cloud customers are individual customers. Dropbox has a very healthy contingent of the same. Amazon, on the other hand, serves corporate customers. In fact, both Apple and Dropbox are Amazon customers. Effectively, some (many?) in the survey checking off Apple and Dropbox as their cloud storage provider may have in fact be using Amazon S9 without being aware of it.
 
Having said this, it is important to point out that while Apple's iCloud service has not been outstanding, it has grown and scaled rather well. Kudos to them.
post #21 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


It doesn't count as a service that anyone that uses iCloud uses but it counts as falling under the iCloud umbrella. Think of it as a cloud-based in-app purchase.

This is a survey based on asking individuals what cloud service they use, if I am mistaken. I bet you some respondents don't really know.

post #22 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

A lot of iOS users don't even realize they're using iCloud..


so in reality, the bar is even higher, seeing as this is the results of a survey asking people if they use iCloud.

post #23 of 90
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

iCloud accounts for 27 percent of cloud customers in America, according to new data published Thursday by Strategy Analytics.

 

Wow.  Doesn't Microsoft have some kind of cloud storage solution?

You know, like all their other "checkbox marketing" me-too-I'm-following-along products?

 

 


Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"Music is currently the key battleground in the war for cloud domination," said Ed Barton ...
 

 

Makes sense.  Audio files are small and the record labels have been humbled by all that MP3 piracy in the late 90s - early 00s.  On the other hand, Apple's extreme makeover of the television industry could take a long time, simply because movies are still big enough to be inconvenient to copy easily.  (Not to mention all those contracts that need to be negotiated...) 

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post #24 of 90
It's truly heart warming to see how well Microsoft's cloud services rank on this chart.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #25 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaptorOO7 View Post

Now if Apple and Google would allow iOS users to sync contacts, calendar and email without iCloud which is what it SHOULD be then I would not need iCloud at all.

 

Yeah, if only Apple would allow that... 1rolleyes.gif

 

Here's a hint -- Apple and Google aren't the only companies that offer calendar, contact and email sync, and iCloud is not the only service that Apple allows to sync with iOS devices.  

 

What Apple does do is make iCloud the easiest way to sync calendar, contacts and emails for iOS and OS X devices.  Is that really what you are complaining about here? That somehow, they shouldn't make their products easy to use?

post #26 of 90

I have said before that a 'problem' with iCloud is that because no interaction takes place (as in Dropbox) it flies under the radar. Its only a problem in terms of public perception, of course. I love and use Dropbox on a daily basis and I, too, would love iCloud to include Dropbox features. 

 

One of the bast iCloud features is the part of Photostream that replaced MM Gallery. There really is no easier way to share photos without going all public.

post #27 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Quote:
My biggest beef with iCloud is only that half of the best apps you can get for iOS are made by douchebag hipsters who only code for DropBox because they think it's "better."   

 

Do you really blame them? With Dropbox you can 'see' your files move them, make folders, copies, share them, delete them, etc. It makes it much easier to develop an app when you can actually test your backup features and debug them. With iCloud you don't have very good visibility of what is actually going on while you are developing an app.

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post #28 of 90

I would love to know what the overlapping numbers are -- I've been a Dropbox user for quite a while now and an MobileMe/iCloud (and more recently, iTunes Match) user for about as long.  I see them as complementary services for my usage.  I haven't looked into something like Google Drive or Amazon Cloud Drive because those needs are already met.

 

I guess my point is, how relevant is it to compare usage numbers of these various services against each other? It's not like every Dropbox user can't be a user of iCloud -- this isn't a zero sum game.

post #29 of 90

Apple's iCloud still needs work but it's kinda magical, knitting together all my devices so I can move seamlessly from one to the next without manual updates. I would never let Amazon or Google have that kind of information cus' "free" is way too expensive. In fact, I wish Apple would take all the Google apps off of iOS. Google pays Apple about a $billion a year for the privilege; Apple doesn't need another billion. It needs to stop Google's looney machinations. Cf. maps and reader.

post #30 of 90
Apple Rules AGAIN, shadyup all you negativity losers!
post #31 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


It doesn't count as a service that anyone that uses iCloud uses but it counts as falling under the iCloud umbrella. Think of it as a cloud-based in-app purchase.

The phrase of the day: cloud-based in-app purchase.

 

Nice! 1smile.gif

post #32 of 90

I'm not sure how informative any of this survey is.. it's effectively asking which cloud services do you know you use.  One big issue I have with this is that they don't mention google music at all.  I've been using that lately, and it works great for my entire music collection (and it's free, so I don't have to pay to access my own music collection as I'd have to do with apple or amazon).  Considering google music is installed on most android devices, and is so easy to use, I'd bet there are a large number of users out there.  I could be wrong, but it's hard to say.  

 

More people realize they're using icloud because the name gets thrown around a lot.  I'm sure there are plenty of people who use it without realizing it, but using it to sync contacts or to find my iphone isn't really making much use of the cloud, and just performs simple tcp/ip queries between devices.  If you really want to get down to the nitty gritty, most EVERY android user is using google's cloud...   Their contacts have always been stored on the cloud, the service syncs between your devices etc.   It all depends on your definition of cloud.

 

Phil

post #33 of 90

That's the beaury of Apple "It just works" unlike all those other services where I have to manage/backup/micro manage it all, but you know those clueless geek losers  just love a command prompt and of course have no time to actually be human and talk to people, remember they have zero social skills

post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spacepower View Post

Apple had iDisk (2000) years before Dropbox, ...

2000 years before Dropbox, huh? Hah hah...
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

With support built into every Mac and iOS device, ...

Nonsense. Only Macs on OS X 10.8.x or higher have full iCloud functionality. Macs on OS X 10.7 have partial functionality. Macs on 10.6.x have zero iCloud functionality. The same goes for iOS: any device running iOS 5 and earlier has no iCloud functionality.

Not ALL Macs and iPhones can even be upgraded to iCloud functionality.
post #35 of 90

Please explain to me why I need to see the file system? Its sooooooo 20th century. Please go away like the dinosuars

post #36 of 90
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post
Not ALL Macs and iPhones can even be upgraded to iCloud functionality.

 

That's right. My LC II and Performa sure can't get it. 

 

Or maybe the article only means modern Macs.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #37 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

That's the beaury of Apple "It just works" unlike all those other services where I have to manage/backup/micro manage it all, but you know those clueless geek losers  just love a command prompt and of course have no time to actually be human and talk to people, remember they have zero social skills

I'm with you on the anti computer geek rant, but Apple's stuff doesn't just work all the time.

It took till the third update of Mountain Lion (3rd bug fix patch) to make the Notes application actually function at all with IMAP servers using mailbox prefixes. Till the latest update a week ago, this was a broken feature for many users. Also, iMessage has a clunky habit of not working as advertised if you turn it off and on on the Mac side (until you delete all existing messages on both sides).

...Also, I have experienced several drag-and-drop scrolling bug behaviors in 10.6.x Finder for years now. There was also the drag-and-drop screen glitches on OS X Lion that were never fixed at all (they made us pay for 10.8 to fix it).

...And the way iOS updates slowly ruin an iPhone's performance, forcing a hardware repurchase. I'm getting pretty disgusted by that issue alone.

Apple makes better stuff than the competition, which works in a much more friendly way than the competition, but it doesn't always JUST WORK. It's just as susceptible to bugs due to needless complexity, and there's still a clear lack of appropriate beta testing, just like in the rest of the industry.

Better design and less monolithic complexity in general makes Apple stuff feel better than Microsoft stuff, but it's still not the ideal the industry should be shooting for.
post #38 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That's right. My LC II and Performa sure can't get it. 

Or maybe the article only means modern Macs.

Har har. There's a vast difference between your humorous example and "modern." Obviously you know that, but you'd still rather be needlessly argumentative. Or you're of the mindset to describe any computer not on the bleeding edge as "not modern." That's not how it works. Maybe you ride that edge constantly. Most computer users don't. Maybe you're a computer geek obsessed with technology. Most users aren't (any more). I used to be a computer geek, and now I've matured into just another person that wants to get stuff done with my tools, while spending cautiously.
post #39 of 90
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post
...And the way iOS updates slowly ruin an iPhone's performance, forcing a hardware repurchase. I'm getting pretty disgusted by that issue alone.

 

Probably because it's not even the case.


…there's still a clear lack of appropriate beta testing, just like in the rest of the industry.

 

I would say there's a lack of fringe case testing.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #40 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post
Not ALL Macs and iPhones can even be upgraded to iCloud functionality.

 

Or maybe the article only means modern Macs.

2006 iMac can't run iCloud but a 2006 Windows machine can.

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