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Apple responds to Australian 'price gouging' allegations, blames markup on content owners - Page 2

post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plagen View Post

Oh, please, just don't pretend you are such a hot currency dealer. As a matter of fact, it looks like you don't even comprehend simple  terms so just stop right there. Unbelievable! End of discussion.

 

You sound like you have suddenly realised your error and are trying to pretend you were right all along.  Unlike you, I do actually have a bit of real world experience in converting between currencies and transferring funds internationally.  I am not a currency dealer and have not said anything to imply I am.  I do, however, make use of the services of a currency dealer from time to time.

post #42 of 49
Originally Posted by Doctor David View Post
I really would appreciate it if you wouldn't edit my posts when you reply. Quoting part of what I wrote can change the context and doesn't seem very (wait for it)... Fair. 1cool.gif

 

I just reduced the sentence to its base structure (sentence diagramming actually does help in the real world 1tongue.gif) . I kept your meaning intact and replied to it directly, even referencing the fact that you're talking about processes that occur invisibly to the consumer and which apply predominantly to streamlining their manufacturing and shipment processes.

 

If you think I changed the meaning from that, I apologize. Was I wrong? 

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I just reduced the sentence to its base structure (sentence diagramming actually does help in the real world 1tongue.gif ) . I kept your meaning intact and replied to it directly, even referencing the fact that you're talking about processes that occur invisibly to the consumer and which apply predominantly to streamlining their manufacturing and shipment processes.

If you think I changed the meaning from that, I apologize. Was I wrong? 

I do think you might wrong. You said "referencing the fact that you're talking about processes that occur invisibly to the consumer". I didnt reference any invisible processes. The part of my post you edited out gave examples of how they are very publicly showing their efforts to be a fair company. My point was that fairness is a valuable commodity in a capitalist system.

My sentence diagraming is causing problems in the real world? 1rolleyes.gif
post #44 of 49
Originally Posted by Doctor David View Post
The part of my post you edited out gave examples of how they are very publicly showing their efforts to be a fair company.

 

Customers don't care about that stuff at all, first, and second, how is anything you said indicative of "fairness"?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

 

... I do actually have a bit of real world experience in converting between currencies and transferring funds internationally.  I am not a currency dealer and have not said anything to imply I am.  I do, however, make use of the services of a currency dealer from time to time.

Right, and I am a 34-24-34 Sweed babe.

 

post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

The Australian government should amend their own legislation.  They have been allowing copyright to be used to restrict importing of products and allowing monopoly distributorships.  To blame Apple is disingenuous.

 

 


100% agree with this ^. I used to buy hardback books from Amazon or Tesco in the UK. When I moved to Australia, the price of books made me laugh. I now buy my books from iTunes and read them on the iPad for a fraction of the cost. Even if I buy a hardback book, it's cheaper to buy it from the UK and have it posted to Australia than buying it here. Madness...

 

Apple products aren't really that much more expensive than the US when you factor in GST costs and the Australian Government's import duties. Compared to the UK though, it's actually cheaper to buy Apple hardware in Australia.

 

I agree that it's rubbish that digital content costs more in Australia, for example TV Shows, but the price of these are set by the studios so shouldn't the government really be bringing them in for questioning?

post #47 of 49

Convert US dollars to Aus Dollars (multiply by 1.04 or so) and then add 10% for Australian GST.

 

$16 sounds about right.

 

Plus, compare US$14 to a US purchasers weekly salary versus AU$16 to your weekly salary, assuming you did a similar job. It's very likely the US buyer would be getting charged more as a percentage. Australian minimal wage is much higher than the US.

 

Sure, the cost of living here in Oz is higher, but that's the price we pay for having a country that is so much better! :o)
 

post #48 of 49
S
Quote:
Originally Posted by ViciousKoala View Post

And they wonder why people pirate music, movies, software, etc.

Hypothetically, if an Apple user doesn't want to subscribe to Spotify, Rdio, etc, all one has to do is subscribe to iTunes Match and torrent their music, ~$35/year is nothing when someone is pirating $100 worth of music.

And for movies, people can download 1080p quality for free, and half the bandwidth.

Obviously I don't need to explain the software, people have been pirating Adobe's Creative Suite for years. Personally I use Pixelmator, why would I pay ~$1000 for Photoshop when I can get something that does almost the same stuff for ~$16?

I'd like to see an explanation as to why Apple overcharge for stuff on the app store, I mean $14 in the US and $16 here. That's completely Apple there.

Spotify costs 20% more in Australia.

ARIA at work again.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #49 of 49
Apple pricing in Australia for products which it has 100% control of is pretty much the same as for the US. There are only slight variances which are easily, and rightly, accounted for in freight, tariffs, local taxes and the like.

This is not the case for other products, such as music, movies and books which are merely resold by Apple at a mark up. Just like any other retailer/reseller, they are subject to the whims of their suppliers.

There is an "Aussie" tax on technology but Apple is not one of those companies partaking. Look toward Adobe and Autodesk for the real offenders.
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