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Editorial: Google?s Android powered by remarkable new 'Flawgic' - Page 8

post #281 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


How in the hell are we suppose to read that as not an iOS-only network if you specifically write "But what about an iOS-only network."

That's fair; I went back to read my post and realized I didn't clearly articulate what I was thinking.

 

I am thinking of providing iOS-only Wifi coverage at heavy traffic corridors such as airports, public transportation systems around the world. Was recently at Heathrow and was frustrated there was no free Wifi. The only option, if one wasn't a subscriber to specific European carriers, was to sign up with Boingo. This is true of many other airports. At many airports where free WiFi is available, coverage is spotty and slow. Very few undergrounds/subwaysbuses have WiFi, never mind free service. 

 

I don't think it would be that difficult/expensive for Apple to team up with locals to provide free, iOS-only 802.11ac service at major airports (even non-major ones) and public transportation systems (undergrounds and buses). If they deploy this, I believe it will suddenly increase the appeal of iOS devices more than any feature they can add to the devices themselves. Imagine enhancing Apple Maps to provide properly validated navigational aids including public transit info (one could use Google Maps but ...). With indoor mapping emerging, this iOS network can make it easier for arriving travellers to navigate to the right exit, not to mention departing travellers to get to the right gate. Imagine the increased appeal of public transit if free WiFi was available on all major undergrounds/subways and buses. All iDevices will be connected when the owners are on the go, either locally or traveling anywhere in the world - perhaps not quite a game-changer on the scale of iCloud but close, I surmise.

 

Google can match this (and they have tried something like this on a limited scale before, without OS restrictions). But are they willing to do so to do this on a large scale and end up helping primarily Samsung? Furthermore, their current returns from mobile do not justify such an investment. Samsung can afford this financially but I am not convinced they have proven themselves in providing "services" yet.

 

That's why I was trying to say, a bit less clearly before.


Edited by stelligent - 3/25/13 at 6:54am
post #282 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

I am thinking of providing iOS-only Wifi coverage at heavy traffic corridors such as airports, public transportation systems around the world. Was recently at Heathrow and was frustrated there was no free Wifi. The only option, if one wasn't a subscriber to specific European carriers, was to sign up with Boingo. This is true of many other airports. At many airports where free WiFi is available, coverage is spotty and slow. Very few undergrounds/subwaysbuses have WiFi, never mind free service. 

 

Interesting idea. Kinda runs against net neutrality, and it would definitely be spoofable, unless it requires iTunes login or something.

 

Maybe Apple could provide it to everybody with an iTunes account (which would be nice considering that many of us do carry non-Apple wifi devices)?

 

I suspect that Boingo and the other wifi providers have exclusive contracts with the airports they serve, though. 

post #283 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by KiltedGreen View Post

 

In 2013 there is an absolute overwhelming deluging of information coming at us from every direction and it's up to us and nobody else to do our best to question its veracity and do our own homework.

Hope you won't take offense. But you have provided a really good example of mixed metaphors and run-on sentence.

post #284 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post

 

Interesting idea. Kinda runs against net neutrality, and it would definitely be spoofable, unless it requires iTunes login or something.

 

Maybe Apple could provide it to everybody with an iTunes account (which would be nice considering that many of us do carry non-Apple wifi devices)?

 

I suspect that Boingo and the other wifi providers have exclusive contracts with the airports they serve, though. 

You're like right about Boingo's exclusivity. Now, how many Apple nickels would it take to buy Boingo? :)

 

I was thinking of using iTunes login. This has the advantage of encouraging more media sales at airports, where idle time leads to idle purchases.

 

Does it run against net neutrality? That would be interesting to see.

post #285 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

You're like right about Boingo's exclusivity. Now, how many Apple nickels would it take to buy Boingo? 1smile.gif

About 4 billion nickels. Boingo's market cap (symbol 'WIFI') is $200 M.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #286 of 298
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post
Why are the article apostrophes showing as question marks?

 

Because Huddler's code is… simple.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #287 of 298
Nice

Edited by Big Brother 84 - 3/27/13 at 11:38am
post #288 of 298

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 9:44am
post #289 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Brother 84 View Post

I thought you had some valid points until you said you swapped your iPhone 5 for a Galaxy Note 2. Hahahahahahahah. No one will ever take you seriously again.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


So a personal preference on screen size warrants complete dismissal of everything he might ever say?

 

Interesting perspective, sadly not atypical here....


Indeed not atypical.

 

But then, it is really BB84 who is not taken seriously.

post #290 of 298
This is one of the most enjoyably funny things I have read in a long time.

Very good work!
post #291 of 298
This argument makes a lot of valid points - but it's *flaw* is that these are premises which point to a diagnosis of a particular issue with Google. Yes, the competition between these companies has degraded into pettiness; but the idea that this is purely Google's fault is crazy.

The most laughable statement has to be "But it also does double-duty in allowing Google%u2019s insanely priced devices, from Glass to Chromebook Pixel, to escape serious criticism of their inherently poor overall value or the likelihood of their ever selling in meaningful volumes." Escape serious criticism? Pretty much everything I read on these products (particularly the Pixel) is serious criticism on those very points. They are poor value, and are probably unlikely to sell in high volumes. But meanwhile you can pick up an unlocked Nexus 4 for under $300. I can see arguments for choosing an iPhone 5, but I can't see that they add up to a justification for paying double the price. It's one thing to criticise a company for selling not many poor-value products, but Apple get away with selling loads of poor-value products by blinding their loyal customers to the fact that whilst their products are good, they're not *that* good.

I recently took the decision to switch from iOS, and got a Nexus 4. Jelly bean actually feels like a far more polished platform, and it costs significantly less to get a good phone to run it on.

The Android platform is fragmented, and there are a lot of rubbish versions and skins; but the poor phones sell at an appropriate price bracket. Oh, and what's in the pipeline? A budget iPhone. That's rather hypocritical isn't it?

This article will seem all the more ludicrous when iOS 7 comes out and Apple drop all the skeuomorphism in favour of design principles chosen by their competitors.
post #292 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

 


Indeed not atypical.

 

But then, it is really BB84 who is not taken seriously.

 

So you think a Galaxy Note 2 is a 'far better phone than the iPhone 5' too? Are you serious? Have you actually tried using one?

post #293 of 298

Well.  Just came out of a week of emergency abdominal surgery to repair previous cancer surgery.  Reading this article wasn't quite as painful as all that, but at least one part does require a major correction.


The diagram being used in relation to Samsung's "SAFE" (Samsung For Enterprise) is wrong.

 

 

 

 

 If "SAFE" were only only about MS Sync, encryption, VPN and MDM, then quite a few Android and iOS devices made for the past few years would be "SAFE".   But it's about Samsung's particular enhancements, so it ONLY refers to devices with their specific MS and MDM features.

 

 

The article also was confused about Samsung's Knox initiative, which goes far, far deeper to ensure separation of personal / enterprise information and apps, by using the secure version Android SE (created by NSA).   While Blackberry has a similar separation via their "Balance" app and latest BES versions, iOS has nothing similar yet.

 

post #294 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowasaki View Post

If you have a touch screen that is virtually the size of a phone then how else are you going to lay it out?  Apple decided on using the large screen first but as these became more available everyone was going to use them eventually anyway. 

The mic and speaker have to be basically where they are, there isn't any real choice there.
The screen has to be where it is, again not much choice there.

The only thing that could be argued over is the location of the home button or even using a home button and the decision to go for the larger touch screen. 


Who designed the first laptop??  All laptops have a similar layout so has everyone copied them?  I'm sure it wasn't Apple so has Apple copied that company? - NO it's just logical.

CLEARLY there IS an argument over whether or not other people have copied Apple based on the number of court cases that Apple and Samsung are winning against each other in various places.

I'm not a fan boy of any marque I simple buy the best thing FOR ME at the time.  At the moment almost all of my personal electronic kit is Apple, I have a top spec 15" retina MBP, a Mac Pro, a retina iPad and until 8 days ago was using an iPhone5 !  But I have a Samsung fridge, 2x TVs, 1 x DVDR and various components in other things.  I use DELL monitors on the MacPro because the inputs were more flexible although if I were replacing the DELL monitors now I would buy 27" thunderbolt displays.

Everyone else at first mocked apple for not providing a physical keyboard. All the pre-iPhone android phones and prototypes had crappy little plastic keyboards. Then some started hiding the keyboards in bulky slide out panels.

Nothing looked like an iPhone until the iPhone. If the design was so obvious how do you explain this?

Before the iPhone no smartphone provided anything remotely resembling a usable web browser. Nobody had sensors to disable a touch screen when the phone was against your ear. Nobody had gyroscopes to sense rotation and automatically rotate the display...

The list goes on and on...
post #295 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Everyone else at first mocked apple for not providing a physical keyboard. 

 

The Blackberry crowd certainly thought a missing keyboard was a bad idea, sure.  

 

As for Windows Mobile, slide-out physical keyboards were actually just becoming a popular option so users could avoid having to tip-tap with a stylus on a tiny onscreen keyboard.

 

That was because of the smaller screens, though.  Full screen software keyboards were also just becoming available and usable on larger screened phones. 

 

Quote:
Nothing looked like an iPhone until the iPhone. 

 

There are not too many basic designs if you decide to go all touch.  

 

In fact, the iPhone prototypes bore a striking resemblance to the actually-sold 2005 Windows CE Pideon Bluebird. (In an EU trial where this phone was shown, Apple lost their trade dress argument.)

 

 

 

There were also non-working all-touch concepts like the 2006 BenQ Black Box, which I think had a cool idea of various modes showing up under a jet black glassy skin.

 

 

Synaptics (the capacitive touchpad suppliers) showed off their working phone prototype during 2006:

There are more examples.

 

Heck, the Open Linux phone movement announced their capacitive multi-touch, pinch-zoom, phone design with icon dock, months before the iPhone was revealed.  (There are some who think Apple immediately stole their ideas.  I don't.  I think it was simply simultaneous, independent design coincidence.  E.g. once you decide to use multi-touch, many obvious gestures follow. Not to mention that everyone had seen Jeff Han's demo by then.)

 

 

Quote:

If the design was so obvious how do you explain this?

 

Why did no major maker switch to all touch at that moment?   One reason is clear:

 

Everyone other than Apple had years of legacy input methods, software, and smaller screens to support. Nobody wanted to alienate their customer base with big changes.

 

Because Apple had no such legacy phones to support, they could skip ahead and do whatever they wished.

 

Now, six years later, Apple is likewise caught in a very similar legacy whirlpool, and it shows in their reluctance to embrace different input, or radical screen size or radical UI changes.

 

Quote:

Before the iPhone no smartphone provided anything remotely resembling a usable web browser. 

 

Some browsers like Opera, Netfront and Picsel (with tap to zoom) were not that bad.  They just needed a bigger screen to work on.

 

For example, in 2001, I was fully mobile on a wireless WinCE Jornada using full Internet Explorer 4.0 (not Pocket IE) on a 640x240 screen.  As most websites at that time were only about 640 wide, it was a great experience with little need for side scrolling and certainly no need for zoom.

 

 

Quote:
Nobody had sensors to disable a touch screen when the phone was against your ear. Nobody had gyroscopes to sense rotation and automatically rotate the display...

 

Sensors have been around forever.

 

Apple is the defendant right now in a case for violating a 1999 (?) Motorola patent on a sensor to disable touch input when the phone is held to the ear.

 

The 2003 MyOrigio all-touch smartphone had a rotation sensor, and could even scroll by tilt, if I recall correctly:

 

 

None of this is meant to denigrate what Apple did by actually bringing a comprehensive package to mass market.   It is meant to preserve pieces of a smartphone history that far too many people are unaware of.


Edited by KDarling - 3/28/13 at 4:17pm
post #296 of 298
So much effort to post so much bullshit. 1oyvey.gif

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #297 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post


Wow! I am just so disappointed that none of the regulars here caught, or pointed out the obvious irony of "Flawgic" at work.

-

I hate the article, and Siri doesn't work for me, for two reasons.

First, I work on three countries, and my accent in two of these languages is that of my own country. Siri doesn't recognize those commands, which sucks a lot, because Dragon Naturally Speaking has absolutely no issues.

Second, Siri is half integrated (as in, I still have to press OK or choose among results instead of just telling Siri to choose the second result). I hope Apple will improve this soon,because it would become awesome. Right now, I can't even use the Notes properly (as in "Siri, make a note that I have to get the key at the counter in the morning", or "Siri, add lines to the note titled "Training" --"What do you want to add to the note titled "Training" -- "Add "Execute 50 pushups before lunch"  " which would be very useful, apart from the doubtful example... I mean, I don't need to train, i'm too sexy for my shirt ;)  )

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #298 of 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 


None of this is meant to denigrate what Apple did by actually bringing a comprehensive package to mass market.   It is meant to preserve pieces of a smartphone history that far too many people are unaware of.

Thank you for posting this. While Apple's design is certainly admirable, I've been saying this about OpenMoko for years (and I was on the translation team of OpenMoko.org BEFORE the iPhone, and I nonetheless do use an iPhone...)

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
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