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Killer deal: 13" MacBook Pro with Retina display falls to $1299 - Page 2

post #41 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

One has to be very retarded to buy the regular MBP. They will for sure be discontinued this year.

 

However, i would love a 17" 2011 and an iPad mini. Where to find one?

 

http://store.apple.com/us/browse/home/specialdeals/mac/macbook_pro/17

post #42 of 57

This is a pretty sweet deal. Wish I needed a new laptop

post #43 of 57
Damn why are these good deals never available in Australia !
post #44 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The steep price cut was initiated by MacConnection, which is currently offering the 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro with 8 gigabytes of RAM and a 128-gigabyte solid-state drive for under $1,300 ? the lowest price seen yet on Apple's high-resolution notebook. The same machine, which sports a 2.5-gigahertz Intel Core i5 processor, sells for $1,699 new when purchased direct from Apple.


 

Uh, what? I'm looking at the Apple website right now, and that model is listed at $1,499, with Best Buy offering it at $1,329 in store. Was this a typo, or does AI just not give a damn about accuracy anymore?

post #45 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post


yes because Apple always does a product upgrade as soon as a new chip is out.

 

Actually, yeah. They might not update the entire line all at once, but the MBP and MBA models are usually updated to the latest chips as soon as Intel releases them. In fact, Apple is rumored to get the pick of the litter when it comes to batches.

post #46 of 57
As a 13" MacBook Air user with 256GB SSD, I can testify that unless you are a lightweight user (as opposed to a mid to power user), even a few years ago, anything under 256GB is not enough. If non SSD computers where at 500GB a few years ago, anything less is stepping back. I am close to running out of space on my year old MBA and will soon upgrade to the more recent model and ensure I have 512GB.

What good having a machine (the Retina 13") with such a nice display that is intended for photographers and videographers, if the drive is so small? Once you choose a larger capacity model, you will pay more and the deal is not so sweet.

Apple probably did this on purpose to get people to specify more SSD at checkout knowing that the machine cannot be upgraded later. (As far as I know anyway?)
post #47 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

I'm sure they care¡

 

Replaceable RAM is more prone to failure than soldered, and the latter can be much faster than the former. Same goes for SSD components.

 

Size (and by extension, weight and portability) is but one argument for the creation of the retina MacBook Pro. System-on-a-board is the future.

 

やれやれ, indeed. 

 

 

I don't care if they care

 

Your comment about replaceable RAM is more prone to failure is #1 irrevant and #2 pretty much made up.     The fact that IF soldered RAM costs a $1500 Logic board to fix, makes your made up statistic irrelevant.   Make is 1/8 thicker and make the SSD NOT proprietary and its resolved.    The reason Apple does this is they WANT you to buy a new Macbook in 3 years and they WANT to charge you a 300% markup on the RAM, and they WANT you to PAY $350 for a 2 Year Warranty.     That is what is really relevant.

 

As long as they keep both lines going, I don't see an issue for folks having a choice but when my only choice is a currently equipped/designed rMBP, I will have to pass.

 

The Macbook Pro non-retina is just as portable and the weight is not really a big difference either.  Like  I said, keep the choice and let folks that want to blow their money, blow away!

post #48 of 57
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post
Your comment about replaceable RAM is more prone to failure is #1 irrevant and #2 pretty much made up.

 

Okay. Proof? Both of irrelevancy (sort of, you know, your entire argument) and inaccuracy.


The reason Apple does this is they WANT you to buy a new Macbook in 3 years and they WANT to charge you a 300% markup on the RAM, and they WANT you to PAY $350 for a 2 Year Warranty.

 

Holy frick! A company that wants people to spend money on its products!

 

Better tell Dell that you found out what they're doing wrong. 


Like  I said, keep the choice and let folks that want to blow their money, blow away!

 

They'll also be blowing you away in performance.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #49 of 57
In dont know. I would love that pixel density but an intel hd4000 to drive that??? No thanks I'll wait for the 2.nd rev....
post #50 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by habi View Post

In dont know. I would love that pixel density but an intel hd4000 to drive that??? No thanks I'll wait for the 2.nd rev....

Of course it does. The rMBP has used the 4000 since the beginning.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post


I don't care if they care

That's OK. They don't care if you care if they care.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post

Your comment about replaceable RAM is more prone to failure is #1 irrevant and #2 pretty much made up.     The fact that IF soldered RAM costs a $1500 Logic board to fix, makes your made up statistic irrelevant.   Make is 1/8 thicker and make the SSD NOT proprietary and its resolved.    The reason Apple does this is they WANT you to buy a new Macbook in 3 years and they WANT to charge you a 300% markup on the RAM, and they WANT you to PAY $350 for a 2 Year Warranty.     That is what is really relevant.

Then don't buy one and stop your whining.

The soldered RAM most certainly is more reliable. It has been well documented that memory sockets are a major source of failure. If the frequency is reduced by a large enough percentage, then the higher price is justified.

It's really quite simple. Apple builds computers they best way they know how. They set the price for the computer. If you think it's a good deal, you buy it. If you don't think it's a good deal, buy something else. All this endless whining about now liking the way Apple does things is silly. Go start your own company if you think you can do better. Or buy something else and take your whining elsewhere.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #51 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The 13" MBP retina display is mid cycle not at the end of its cycle. The price was already dropped by Apple and now resellers are dropping the price even more.  The price point on that product was bad from day one. Clearly it isn't selling well at the current price point. However I am going to bite on this one at 1299.00.

 

It isn't a bad product at all. It's actually quite good. But for some reason people aren't buying it, and that's worrying. Perhaps it needs better advertising. I wonder if the cMBP will last one more year as a result. Maybe 13" MacBook Pro buyers (traditionally "budget" buyers by Apple standards) aren't quite ready to make the jump  to pricey Macs with fast, but relatively small 128GB SSD storage.

post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

As a 13" MacBook Air user with 256GB SSD, I can testify that unless you are a lightweight user (as opposed to a mid to power user), even a few years ago, anything under 256GB is not enough. If non SSD computers where at 500GB a few years ago, anything less is stepping back. I am close to running out of space on my year old MBA and will soon upgrade to the more recent model and ensure I have 512GB.

What good having a machine (the Retina 13") with such a nice display that is intended for photographers and videographers, if the drive is so small? Once you choose a larger capacity model, you will pay more and the deal is not so sweet.

Apple probably did this on purpose to get people to specify more SSD at checkout knowing that the machine cannot be upgraded later. (As far as I know anyway?)

 

Not necessarily. I use a 256GB 13" rMBP and had a 256GB MBA before, but I got along just fine with a 128GB model prior to 2011. I would still if I didn't need to run a few Windows applications. With USB 3.0, fast external storage is cheap and easy. There are 64GB and 128GB flash drives now that outperform typical hard drives. 

post #53 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Okay. Proof? Both of irrelevancy (sort of, you know, your entire argument) and inaccuracy.

 

 

So, let me understand your incredible argument here....  You make a statistic up and then you expect me to show proof its not true?     How about YOU show the evidence supporting the statistical statement you made.     I feel like I am discussing this with a 7 year old.

 

 

With respect to Apple making money, that is all true but it is not contrary to what I said and I didn't say it was wrong.  What I was saying was that it is a poor choice to purchase rMBP just because it is thinner and not taking into account the possible huge financial requirements to fix the equipment.   They could have made it 1/8" thicker and removed this issues altogether.    There are many reasons I believe they did not, including all the financial reasons listed in my previous posts.    I also believe that Apple has been on this "thinner = innovation" kick for a few year.   While making something thinner is considered innovation, you can forget about other important items. The new iMac is a perfect example.    They upgraded the specs (barely), but they ran their whole marketing campaign on how thin is "looks"  (take note that I put looks in quotes).   They removed significant functionality to give the DESKTOP iMac a thinner "look"   I would have liked the new lower glare screen, USB 3.0 ports, and spec bumps while still having the ability to upgrade a drive or and memory (on the 21.5") without removing glue and disassembling the thing to change them out.  All in the name of "THIN"

 

Apple needs to get over "THIN"   and get back to making products that differentiate themselves based on performance.

 

Also, if you pull your head out of the Cupertino sand, you can look around at other laptops and realize that the MBP does not blow many of them away.  They compete and possible beat some lower end models.   Apple does blow them away in cost.

post #54 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post

 

So, let me understand your incredible argument here....  You make a statistic up and then you expect me to show proof its not true?     How about YOU show the evidence supporting the statistical statement you made.     I feel like I am discussing this with a 7 year old.

 

 

With respect to Apple making money, that is all true but it is not contrary to what I said and I didn't say it was wrong.  What I was saying was that it is a poor choice to purchase rMBP just because it is thinner and not taking into account the possible huge financial requirements to fix the equipment.   They could have made it 1/8" thicker and removed this issues altogether.    There are many reasons I believe they did not, including all the financial reasons listed in my previous posts.    I also believe that Apple has been on this "thinner = innovation" kick for a few year.   While making something thinner is considered innovation, you can forget about other important items. The new iMac is a perfect example.    They upgraded the specs (barely), but they ran their whole marketing campaign on how thin is "looks"  (take note that I put looks in quotes).   They removed significant functionality to give the DESKTOP iMac a thinner "look"   I would have liked the new lower glare screen, USB 3.0 ports, and spec bumps while still having the ability to upgrade a drive or and memory (on the 21.5") without removing glue and disassembling the thing to change them out.  All in the name of "THIN"

 

Apple needs to get over "THIN"   and get back to making products that differentiate themselves based on performance.

 

Also, if you pull your head out of the Cupertino sand, you can look around at other laptops and realize that the MBP does not blow many of them away.  They compete and possible beat some lower end models.   Apple does blow them away in cost.

 

Apple products generally have never won spec contests. Plus, it seems to me that "thin" not only is a reflection of Jony Ive's design philosophy, but a culmination of their philosophy, starting from Steve Jobs, that computing devices should be largely appliance-like and not requiring or capable of significant user modification. Agree or disagree with it, that's not really a new thing at Apple. The original Mac wasn't intended to be opened. The iPod, iPhone, and iPad have always been sealed devices. Mac notebooks haven't had user replaceable batteries in years.

 

Possibly one issue that the 13" rMBP has is that there isn't as much, on paper, to differentiate it from the MacBook Air. Having owned both (and being a longtime fan of the Air, I think that the rMBP in practice has a lot going for it. It is just a little difficult to explain in terms of "specs" or simple terms. The screen needs to be seen in person, and side by side with a non-Retina screen to truly be appreciated (it isn't quite the same "wow" factor that quadrupling the resolution brought to phones, for instance, but it is there). Color gamut is another feature that is hard to explain but must be seen in person. Plus, the full voltage processors do seem to make a difference. Even though the theoretical maximum performance of the base 2.5/2.6GHz i5s is matched by the high-end ULV i7s, in practice, the full voltage i5 is less likely to throttle.

 

As for cost, Apple notebooks have always been expensive. Even the 13" cMBP at $1199 is pricey considering that it's a bulky 4.5lb notebook with a relatively low-resolution screen and 5400rpm HDD. It hasn't seemed to stop sales of that model. I think the 13" rMBP at $1499 compares quite favorably to the $1499 cMBP.

post #55 of 57
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post
So, let me understand your incredible argument here....  You make a statistic up and then you expect me to show proof its not true?     How about YOU show the evidence supporting the statistical statement you made.     I feel like I am discussing this with a 7 year old.


I was under the impression that was your argument, given that you're not showing any evidence of your own.

 

I'd love for you to explain how NOT having a removable set of contacts and receptacle therefor would increase failure rate (or at the very least, not lower it), but you don't care enough to back your own argument so I won't worry about it.


What I was saying was that it is a poor choice to purchase rMBP just because it is thinner and not taking into account the possible huge financial requirements to fix the equipment.

 

Because it's free to fix the old one? 1oyvey.gif


They could have made it 1/8" thicker and removed this issues altogether.


No. They couldn't have.


They upgraded the specs (barely)…


And there goes your argument.


They removed significant functionality…

 

That "significant" functionality being what, your vaunted removable RAM again? 


…to give the DESKTOP iMac a thinner "look"… All in the name of "THIN"…

 

Yes, you don't understand why Apple does what it does. We know that. You don't need to draw more attention to it.


…realize that the MBP does not blow many of them away.  They compete and possible beat some lower end models.   Apple does blow them away in cost.

 

Really? "Many of them" have dual (one!) Thunderbolt? Retina displays? Fans designed to be as quiet as possible? "Many of them" are this thin, this light, this sturdy? "Many of them" have a seven hour battery and 30 days of standby? "Many of them" have OS X? And "many of them" can be had with all of these features for less than the MacBook Pro? Really?

 

COME. OFF. IT. And since so few seem to know what that means: get off this kick of lying about Apple, either intentionally or due to a lack of knowledge.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #56 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post

Apple needs to get over "THIN"   and get back to making products that differentiate themselves based on performance.

It's really simple. Apple is the most profitable company on the planet. They are the leaders that everyone else is following. AFAIK, they've been around longer than any other personal computing manufacturer. Their market share continues to grow. Even with the drop in share price, they're still worth $415,700,000,000.

If you think you can do better, you'd better start now. Just think how much money your company will be worth since you're so much smarter than Apple.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #57 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilM View Post

 

Except of course people who want an internal optical drive; or standard form factor, user replaceable main storage; or upgradeable RAM.

 

Best be careful about who you call "retarded", lest your face show up in the picture frame.

Exactly correct.

 

I have a 2.6 GHz 256 GB 13" rMBP and while it is undoubtedly a good machine, I prefer the 13" cMBP - I've been able to upgrade it with 16 GB RAM and a 1 TB Momentus XT drive.  I also need an optical drive for work, along with ethernet (and I think external optical drives and dongles to convert to ethernet defeat the point of having an all-in-one laptop in the first place). 

 

I bought my retina from a college kid for $1200, so I don't think the $1299 price point is sufficiently compelling, especially for 128 GB of storage. 

 

I hope Apple keeps the cMBP around for a couple more generations, while working to expand the storage and RAM of the retina and bringing the price down as retina displays come down in cost.

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