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Editorial: Where does Apple take iOS next?

post #1 of 162
Thread Starter 
This summer, Apple is expected to unveil iOS 7 and new devices to run it, with rumors ranging from new form factors (including an "iWatch") to revisions of the existing iPhone, iPod touch and iPad.

iPad mini


What's Apple most likely to do?



The safest bet on the future of Apple's iOS hardware: a continuation of what it has been doing. That is, conservative but significant updates of the company's existing devices.

This assuredly includes a new iPad 5 with the slim, light form factor and reduced display margin of the existing iPad mini released last fall. Better audio, better WiFi, more storage and faster chips are also all safe bets for the next generation iPhones and iPads.

It's not much of a guess to say Apple will deliver at least a doubling of Ax chip performance across the board for its existing iOS product lines. Apple (and all of its fellow ARM-licensees) essentially double SoC performance in their chip designs every year, and GPU speeds have been accelerating even faster.

Apple's A-series chips


Recall that the iPhone 4S was over twice as fast as the 4, despite being yawned at as "boring" by many of the same crowd that cheered for Samsung's Galaxy S4, which itself is also "only" twice as fast as the model it replaced.

Every iPhone has also shipped with software capable of taking real advantage of that new processing power. This is particularly evident in the Camera app, where the 4 debuted HDR, the 4S made it much faster and added additional processing features, and the 5 added Panoramas and further accelerated and embellished image and video processing.

How about bolder changes in product categories?



Beyond the expected faster hardware and new software features to take advantage of it, Apple is also rumored to be working on a lower priced iPhone and possibly one with a larger screen.

It wouldn't take much to make the iPhone 4S cheaper; chips, screens and other components are always dropping in price as manufacturing refinements help bring down production costs. Apple is also investing up to $9 billion this year in production upgrades to accelerate this trend.

Creating a larger screen iPhone would definitely appeal to a certain demographic, but it's not clear what additional new revenues this might generate. On the other hand, it would definitely create the appearance that Apple is copying Samsung and other Android makers, even if there's nothing really novel or proprietary about increasing screen sizes.

But what about entirely new form factors, such as a rumored watch running iOS? On one hand, the concept of wearable iOS devices (like a watch that provides a connected, secondary screen that's easy to consult for checking messages and other notifications while your phone remains in your pocket) are both sensible and have some precedent behind them.

Zombie watch



Apple's "fat" 6th generation iPod nano toyed with watch features over two years, and the company even offered a variety of custom watch faces (below) for it up until last fall, when it killed the product and replaced it with a "stick" iPod nano that resembled a smaller iPod touch, albeit without the apps and other features of iOS.

iPod nano


Apple may have terminated the nano-watch concept simply because it wasn't popular enough, but dead products have returned to life as iOS devices at least twice before.

Steve Jobs killed Apple's first pad, the five year old Newton MessagePad in 1998. Its death was attributed to various things, including its limited popularity and a dramatic grudge against John Sculley (although Jobs didn't also cancel Sculley's QuickTime or PowerBook out of similar, supposed bitterness).

Stylus-based tablets


In reality, the MessagePad and its Newton OS were moderately successful, and had even attracted third party licensees, including Motorola, which sold a wireless version of it named the Marco. Maintaining the unique Newton platform had become an expensive distraction for Apple however, so Jobs terminated it to focus attention on Mac OS, in particular the transition to Mac OS X based on technology from NeXT.

Twelve years later, Apple had not only turned the Mac into a serious business but had spun off iOS to power its new smartphone, enabling Jobs to successfully reintroduce the iPad as a new ARM-based tablet running the company's modern mobile platform.

During that period, Apple again partnered with Motorola to announce its ROKR phone capable of working like an iPod to play iTunes songs. After it failed to take off, Apple launched its own iPhone two years later, based on a new, mobile version of OS X that came to be called iOS.

So it certainly wouldn't be unthinkable for Apple to introduce a new iOS watch product one year after taking its embedded iPod nano watch off the market (although this time, it doesn't seem likely Apple will be partnering with Motorola in any fashion to do so!)

Mitigating the risks of failure and distraction



At the same time, there're are a couple significant problems looming for iWatch. The first one is that Apple still doesn't like distractions. Unlike its peers, it doesn't ship hundreds of different products to see which ones might garner any attention. Apple is incredibly selective about introducing new models of its products.

Additionally, unlike the smartphone or tablet markets, there's currently no overwhelming sense that a new watch would necessarily sell in mass quantities. More than just being a distraction, if Apple were to launch an "iWatch" with great fanfare only to see it flop, it would have a tremendously negative impact on the company's image.

While Apple has suffered through a series of tepid or negatively received launches of free services (including MobileMe, Ping and Maps), it has experienced very few hardware flops since the G4 Cube and Xserve (2007's iPod HiFi is a notable one, and actually more of a fizzled dud than serious flop). That makes introducing a new category of iOS hardware a rather risky proposition.

iPod HiFi


Lowered expectations



There are two alternatives available for branching out into new hardware, and Apple has already performed both with relative success. One is to soft launch a new product (like an iWatch or other wearable devices) as a "hobby," as it did with Apple TV.

Apple's chief executive Tim Cook speaks of Apple TV as "a string it keeps pulling to see where it leads," indicating that its a strategic direction without a clear business model. It initially didn't sell that well, and while sales have improved dramatically, it's still treated as a "hobby" despite having leading market share.

Apple TV


This was certainly a lot savvier than Google's arrogant launch of Google TV, which had Eric Schmidt grandly projecting in 2011 that it would be installed in half of all shipping televisions by the next summer. Instead, the product spectacularly flopped, and a large part of its flatulently embarrassing deflation was related to all the hot air pumped into its launch theatrics.

Google can shrug off such failure thanks only to flawgic, which credits the company with "at least boldly trying" every time it throws in the towel on a very expensive experiment. Apple can't do that and still continue to collect the revenues and profits it's grown accustom to earning.

Launching something like a watch as an experimental hobby is nearly what Apple did with the previous generation of iPod nano, so it wouldn't be unthinkable for the company to relaunch a new product almost as an accessory, without creating massive expectations that might likely fail to materialize. But there's also an even safer path for new hardware, which Apple has also already explored.


Let somebody else do it



An even easier way for Apple to expand its iOS hardware business would be to take a page from its wildly successful App Store experiment and let third parties try things out, paying Apple a cut for managing their operations with market infrastructure and promotion. That's essentially what Apple has done in the area of speakers since the iPod HiFi was canceled.

Apple doesn't seem to get enough credit for the App Store's success because few observers yet realize what an incredible job Apple did with it. It's not that the App Store is flawless or impossible to criticize; it simply works for its intended purpose. It creates lots of high quality software for iOS, and does so self-sustainingly. Or more accurately, it does so at a significant profit.

App Store


Apple did such a great job at implementing and curating the App Store that the industry at large has assumed that it must be really easy to do. Google announced they'd replicate its success even "more openly" and with fewer restrictions and the media ate it up. But five years later, Google Play is still vastly impoverished as a software source, and the rest of the Android markets, including Amazon's, are also still hobbyist outlets that feel like a Ross Dress for Less compared to Apple's Bloomingdales experience.

Palm scoffed at Apple's entrance into smartphones, but then observed its own Palm OS software market collapse into irrelevance. Nokia, Blackberry and Microsoft also operated major mobile software platforms prior to Apple, but their stores couldn't even copy Apple's fast enough to remain open. And new stores they've reopened since, closely following the pattern of the tremendously successful App Store, have also failed to garner much interest.

Apple's App Store is essentially a venture capital fund without the capital. It encourages entrepreneurial experimentation, and rewards the best work with huge exposure to a vast global audience. You get funded only after you deploy your work successfully, making it an intense meritocracy that's really difficult to duplicate from scratch in competition. At this point, copying the App Store is like copying Microsoft's Office suite or Adobe's Photoshop.

The App Store seemingly should have failed due to the catch-22 at its launch of there being both a limited installed base of iPhones and no existing software. That combination of issues has doomed lots of aspiring platforms. But Apple's fledgling store was helped by the fact that Apple itself had created some killer apps (including Safari, Maps and Mail) that were enough to spark interest in the new iPhone even before there was a third party platform for it.

Of course, it also helped that Apple had a half decade of experience with iTunes, curating audio and video content and experimenting with iPod game sales. The conditions were perfectly set up the moment the iPhone was primed to ignite an App Store.

Once having been established, the App Store's success has driven exponential growth. Apple expanded it to the iPad and even replicated it on the Mac. But it also managed to leverage the iOS platform in another way, via its Made for iPhone licensing program.

App Store for hardware



In addition to creating a software ecosystem for iOS, Apple has also launched a hardware accessory ecosystem. From chargers to adapters to speakers and wirelessly connected accessories, Apple's Made for iPhone program essentially duplicates the concept of the App Store for hardware. And as with the App Store, the road toward "Made for iPhone" had been paved by previous efforts to license accessories for iPods.

Given its current licensing programs, Apple doesn't even need to launch a watch of its own. In fact, its retail stores already stock a variety of watches and sensor bands, even "wearables" for your pets. A variety of other health and sports activity devices for everything from running to biking already exist, along with AirPlay speakers and AirPrint printers.

Apple decided years ago that it doesn't need to build printers and cameras. But today, it can not only sell other makers' products, but can in many cases even earn licensing fees in addition to retail profits. While AirPrint is apparently free, AirPlay involves licensing fees to use Apple's protocols. The company also has licensing programs for Lightning (and the previous Dock Connector) and wirelessly connected peripherals.

Apple can even wait in stealth mode, observing what the market finds interesting before buying up the most successful accessory makers and taking their products into high volume production. Or it can continue to host a wide variety of accessory alternatives, each of which offers Apple licensing fees to leverage the value of its platform. That gives Apple a variety of options for entering the wearables business without actually launching an "iWatch."

Future software features for iOS 7



What about the future software direction for iOS? Apple has a series of major initiatives it's developing for iOS, many of which are the offspring of acquisitions, including Siri, Maps and iTunes Match.

There are a number of other smart ideas that Apple has cultured in its App Store petri dish of third party developers that it likely should implement as unique, differentiating features of iOS. Again, there's the question of how to best do this.

Apple needs to be careful to not simply stomp on its developers (or give the appearance of doing so). In some cases, it might make sense for Apple to acquire apps that could be integrated into iOS. Consider Snapchat, based on the simple premise of sharing short photos or videos that expire after a few seconds. Or the walkie talkie style messaging of Voxer.

SnapchatVoxer


It's hard to see how either free app will effectively monetize its continued existence on iOS, but both could be rolled into iMessages by Apple to expand iOS 7's messaging capabilities and "stickiness" while at the same time making the platform more differentiated (both apps already offer Android ports).

In other cases, iOS might be better served feeding traffic to partner apps, the way iOS 6 integrates with social networks like Twitter and Facebook, or helper apps for directions in Maps.

There's a lot Apple can do on its own, too. Text services continue to evolve; Apple should continue to develop Data Detectors to highlight and activate relevant data, identifying and highlighting dates, locations, contacts, phone numbers, email and addresses in selected text and providing useful actions for them, depending on the context.

It'd be great to see an AirDrop client in iOS 7 for easy desktop file sharing, as well as iCloud support for email certificates for encrypting and signing emails the same what it automatically encrypts iMessages.

Apple's three iPhone models account for three of the top five cameras in Flickr, so why not capitalize on that with more sophisticated Camera app features and image editing? Add support for creating, say, time lapse captures and converting short videos to GIFs for sharing.

What features are you wishing for in iOS 7?

Tending the platform



People like to argue about whether Apple is a hardware company or a software company, but in reality, Apple is a platform company. It builds devices that run a differentiated software platform for third parties to create apps for. The challenge for Apple is to maintain that platform without simply being ripped off by a competitor making cheaper hardware or subsidizing its hardware with ads.

Or, alternatively, to avoid letting the platform grow stagnant and being passed up by competitors who can attract their own, stronger ecosystems to support their own platform instead.

In some cases, Apple needs to develop its own apps, as it has for iLife and iWorks apps. There's no equivalent to these apps for Android, BlackBerry or Tizen, making them key differentiators to Apple's mobile platform, the same way they were for the Mac a decade ago.

At the same time, Apple can leverage its iOS development platform and iTunes App Store to attract billions of dollars in third party hardware and software development, accomplishing far more than it otherwise could if it were trying to build every app and accessory on its own. What, exactly, Apple plans to do with iOS 7 will likely be detailed in a couple months at its Worldwide Developer Conference.
post #2 of 162

Wait, how was the XServe a 'flop'? They sold it for 9 years.

 

I'm liking just about everything else here. In before Gatorguy's prediction of "how many pages this piece will drum up on a weekend".

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #3 of 162
The future will be the same as the past:

Apple will iterate and improve, steadily and relentlessly, usually step by step rather than in isolated jumps that sell ads on news sites. They will improve on their already great products, achieving ever greater results. The media and the stock market manipulators will cry doom and gloom, and all the while, Apple's profits--and the excellence enjoyed by their users--will remain on top.

At the same time, Apple's competitors will be doing the same small iterations, the difference being that they are building on what Apple did. These small steps when taken without an Apple logo will be called "innovation." There will also be lots of exaggerated publicity and wild flailing and failed features, of the kind Apple would never be forgiven for--but other companies can make such missteps and get a free pass.

Out of all that, "excellence enjoyed by their users" is all I care about. (And secondarily, the hope that ever more people will enjoy the same. They will: switching rates TO iOS and FROM iOS are far from equal.)
post #4 of 162
Tim Cook said that Apple is not a hardware company, it is a "Platform" company.

The combine suite of iOS, OS X, iCloud and Apple applications and technologies are going to conquer both the homes and corporations across the globe. Expect to see Apple's platforms everywhere: at homes, on the roads, in schools, in hospitals, stores, airplanes, corporations etc...

The value of Apple will be the intersection of Technology and Liberal Arts. The hardware or software by themselves will become less important but the value of integrated platform will become much more important.

What will matter most is not only design esthetics and ergonomics but what the platform as a whole can do. The world will choose Apple as the platform of choice as it will offer something good for everyone.

Welcome to the platform wars...
post #5 of 162
This is an awfully weak article. In the first place, while purporting to be about the future of iOS (a software platform), it goes on about everything under the sun for one and a half pages without even getting to the starting gate. Then there's just a few paragraphs about the software containing no new ideas, no suggestions, and essentially devoid of any content.

Specifically, the section on the iPod nano "watch" is seriously misleading and almost completely inaccurate.

This section:

"Apple's "fat" 6th generation iPod nano toyed with watch features over two years, and the company even offered a variety of custom watch faces … for it up until last fall, when it killed the product and replaced it with a "stick" iPod nano that resembled a smaller iPod touch, albeit without the apps and other features of iOS.

Apple may have terminated the nano-watch concept simply because it wasn't popular enough, but dead products have returned to life as iOS devices at least twice before. "

Gives the impression that Apple already launched an "iWatch" of sorts, supported it for a time, and then decided to "terminate" it, when in fact none of that happened at all.

In fact, the "nano as watch" concept came from other sources, was not promoted by Apple and pretty much the only support they ever gave it was the fact that several months after people started using namos as watches, Apple released a few watch faces for it. Other than that, Apple provided no support at all for the concept of a watch and the concept wasn't theirs in the first place.

This is just revisionist claptrap.
post #6 of 162

Things will continue to improve. End of story. :D

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #7 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Wait, how was the XServe a 'flop'? They sold it for 9 years.

 

I'm liking just about everything else here. In before Gatorguy's prediction of "how many pages this piece will drum up on a weekend".


Agree. Many of us loved and now miss XServe.

post #8 of 162

*Crosses fingers* Please don't be DED... Please don't be DED...

*Click* -- 

Aw, crap!

 

Well, at least he acknowledged the existence of the Newton.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #9 of 162

Windows looked basically the same for almost 12 years from XP to Win 7 and it worked fine. Then MS decided they needed to change things and gave us Windows 8 and how has that worked out so far?

 

Don't change for change sake. Apple will add some new features but I don't expect them to do a wholesale change for iOS 7. People who complain iOS is "stale" and "looks the same" are hypocrites considering they've been using Windows forever without any major changes.

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

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Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

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post #10 of 162
I think a new form factor is where they have to go next.
 
Computers were stagnant for a while until mobile devices opened up new usage models that made new apps possible. But now even phones have reached the same app saturation point as desktops (that's why it's so hard to imagine what new stuff to add) and there needs to be a new golden child. 
 
Whether it's a wristwatch or glasses I don't know, but Apple's job is to make it beautiful enough that people actually want to wear it. That is a real challenge! Harder than a phone. And yes a real risk, if they get it wrong.
 
App developers can come up with the cool new software, what they can't do, and what they need from Apple, is a beautiful product.
post #11 of 162

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 9:49am
post #12 of 162
I love my girlfriend's iPhone, but have been holding off buying one due to a few substantial limitations (to me). The include:

1. no easy system-wide sharing.
2. a keyboard that does not change to capital letters when hitting shift key (only small shift key lights up) and
3. too small of screen for my old man eyes (ok, this is hardware, not iOS)

is it too much to ask for these few improvements to iOS? I mean really, Android solved each of these complaints years ago.

I really want to switch, but can't get past these.
post #13 of 162
This was certainly a lot savvier than Google's arrogant launch of Google TV [...]  and a large part of its flatulently embarrassing deflation was related to all the hot air pumped into its launch theatrics.

 

 

Like they say in Hollywood, "There aren't any new stories, but there's always a new audience."

WebTV failed in the '90s.  Google TV was the same concept plus broadband and hi-def.

 

Also, as P.T. Barnum is reputed to have said, "There's a sucker born every minute."

Google knows this and they continually try to exploit the easily-tech-amused with products like Google TV.

It sucks, but it's complex and technical and awkward.  Therefore it attracts alpha-geek-wannabes.

Google's problem is that although the company itself is composed of a bunch of geeks, the mass market isn't.

They build products to amuse themselves, and expect those products to sell to the general public.  

Oops.

 
(FYI, the "sucker" phrase was first said by David Hannum, not Barnum.)

 

 

 

 

Google can shrug off such failure thanks only to flawgic, which credits the company with "at least boldly trying" every time it throws in the towel on a very expensive experiment.

 

 

But they can't shrug off the Motorola acquisition.  That "expensive experiment" consumed 1.5 years of profit.

They'll need to differentiate the Motoroogle phone not just with hardware tweaks but with OS tweaks as well.

We've seen how poorly the Nexus phones have sold.  Generic OS.  Generic hardware.  "Reference" design.

[crickets...]

 

Differentiating the Motoroogle phone means giving it proprietary OS features that only it has.

And that means forking Android yet again.  There will be a new "Motoroogle fork."

The only question is whether it will come before or after the Samsung fork.

 

Sure, Google will continue to ship a trailing-edge boilerplate Android release with basic features.

(The best features being reserved for just the Motoroogle phone and possibly a tablet as well.)

The hopeless generic Android handset makers, all selling exclusively to the Chinese market, 

all of whom are competing against each other's Chinese-only "ecosystems" and against Google Play,

will snap up that generic release, do the quickest, dirtiest, cheapest hacks on it, then try to

beat each other to market and to push each other off the low-price cliff.  (The classic "race to the bottom"

among undifferentiated whitebox vendors with zero brand loyalty among their users.)

And none of the Chinese Generics (tm) will generate one single yuan of revenue for Google.

 

Meanwhile, Google will keep the best new features to itself.  They might mash them into the "generic"

fork a year or two after they ship those features in their Motoroogle phone.  But said features will be

the only way that Google has any chance of differentiating its Motoroogle phone from Samsung's.

 

Google has to do it.  Because otherwise, the Motorola acquisition (and the entire Android project itself)

will be their most "expensive experiment."  And Samsung will take control of Android with their own

Samsung Fork, which will become the de facto standard due to sheer market share.  And none of

that massive Samsung slice of the Android pie will be worth a single penny to Google, because Samsung

has their own ecosystem now.  Google absolutely must generate revenue through Google Play, and they

only way to guarantee that, and to control their own destiny, is to sell a successful Motoroogle phone

(and maybe a pad later) that is connected to Google Play.

 

~$20 billion in the hole already.  

Time to start climbing.  FAST.


Edited by SockRolid - 3/30/13 at 12:09pm

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #14 of 162
"experienced very few hardware flops since the G4 Cube and Xserve (2007's iPod HiFi is a notable one, and actually more of a fizzled dud than serious flop)."

Jobs never failed so we can pin these flops on Cook. /s
post #15 of 162

Wonder if we will ever find out what Steve Jobs' revelation was, on how to make TV easier to use.

post #16 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post


Agree. Many of us loved and now miss XServe.

Who's missing I still have one, bought it at a UBS overstock auction for 100 CHF. It's a Xserve G5 Cluster Node. I had visions of grandeur of using it as webserver. A lot of people don't realize how big and heavy they are. It's in the basement now, in all of it's beauty along with the rest of my computing treasures like; 25th Anniversary Mac, Powerbook 100 (just bought a new battery), G4 Cube, SGI O2/Indy and a Next Turbo. I'm currently looking for a mint condition Amiga 5,000 with Video Toaster and a Powerbook 2400 (still my favorite laptop of all time).
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #17 of 162
I think iOS 7 will be huge. After Scott left I heard that he was very arrogant perhaps now that Craig is taking over there will be much more innovation. Also, Jony took over the design aesthetics of iOS and OS X...I think we'll see a revamp of the home screen in this update. Also, Apple didn't give the iPhone 5 and unique software feature like they have with previous iPhones (Siri, FaceTime, voice control) I've got a feeling Apple was/is working on something, but it wasn't finished by the time of the announcement.
post #18 of 162

I want the following:

 

- app interoperability

- shared files in iCloud

- iWork update taking advantage of the above

- XCode on iOS

- displays with built-in AirPlay support

 

I want to be able to throw my Mac in the trash.

post #19 of 162
Would at least like to see some form of widgets in iOS. I have an Android for work and although the app experience is pretty poor, I do like the ability to have a couple of relevant widgets on a page for quick viewing.
post #20 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublej2119 View Post

I think iOS 7 will be huge. After Scott left I heard that he was very arrogant perhaps now that Craig is taking over there will be much more innovation. Also, Jony took over the design aesthetics of iOS and OS X...I think we'll see a revamp of the home screen in this update. Also, Apple didn't give the iPhone 5 and unique software feature like they have with previous iPhones (Siri, FaceTime, voice control) I've got a feeling Apple was/is working on something, but it wasn't finished by the time of the announcement.


Well, there was Apple Maps. And you are right; it wasn't finished at the time of announcement :)

post #21 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


In before Gatorguy's prediction of "how many pages this piece will drum up on a weekend".

For the entire weekend? Probably 2 max.

The article doesn't spend enough time dissing Apple competitors, instead staying on topic for the most part, so no one really cares enough to comment.1wink.gif
Edited by Gatorguy - 3/30/13 at 1:00pm
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #22 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublej2119 View Post

I think iOS 7 will be huge.

 

Not a chance. The new mantra for anything coming from Apple is "yawnnnn." From tech blogs to stock analysts, to the troll cadre right here on AI, nothing Apple does anymore is worth a plug nickel. The troll talking point of "iOS feels old and stale" has permeated the tech universe. You read it on every blog, a falsehood that has taken on a life of its own and has become true by simple repetition.

 

All you have to do is look at @ ankleskater's reply to your post. It's all a big joke now to these types.

post #23 of 162

To me it's obvious that Apple has been working on something big for iOS since the last few years. 

 

There are a few core features that require some heavy changes to iOS. 

 

Multi-user, instant app-switching, spilt-screen multi-tasking, direct inter-application communication are all features that would be better implemented in a separate branch of iOS because they require major changes in the same areas of iOS foundations.

 

This separate branch of iOS probably ended up taking much more time to complete than it was planned. My guess is that iOS 5 was originally supposed to be that one, and they missed the iOS 6 release too and used it instead to get Siri and Maps out of the way before the next big change which will presumably happen in iOS 7.

 

Edit: Note that these changes may still have to wait another year and come in the form of iOS 8.

post #24 of 162
Darn. Am I the only one that thinks that the Cube is one of the greatest pieces of Apple hardware I've ever owned? :-/
post #25 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Wonder if we will ever find out what Steve Jobs' revelation was, on how to make TV easier to use.

Yes, we will.
post #26 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Now that iOS has drop-down notifications, obviously the next step will be to add widgets. :)

I agree. Weather would be a good place to start, maybe stocks, for those interested in that kind of stuff.

I don't know about Facebook or Twitter updates or how much battery power that would use up in an hour's time.

post #27 of 162

Daniel, 

I always enjoy reading your stuff. I can't say that I always agree with you but unlike other bloggers, you put some thought in yours.

post #28 of 162
Steve jobs said a few years before his death that Apple was in its DNA a Software company that made hardware.

I will go with what he said.
post #29 of 162
I have a Apple Hi Fi, still great like the AppleTV works very well using it everyday I would like to get a new speaker system, but the Hi Fi just continues to excel, the Geek press has moved on and thinks of the AppleTv (sales have doubled every year), Apple Hi Fi, Siri or Apple Maps as flops (because they say so), but they all work very well in comparison to similar products released by other companies. But Apple continues to make Siri, Maps, and AppleTv better with each revision.
post #30 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Darn. Am I the only one that thinks that the Cube is one of the greatest pieces of Apple hardware I've ever owned? :-/
Certainly one of the most beautiful computers still to this day IMHO. I never owned one, but even as recent as last year was thinking of picking one up as an art piece.
post #31 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Darn. Am I the only one that thinks that the Cube is one of the greatest pieces of Apple hardware I've ever owned? :-/
You want us to judge the greatest piece of Apple hardware you've ever owned?
post #32 of 162

I'm pretty sure it was Airplay.  Which is fantastic but one needs the AppleTV and a wifi connection (with both devices on the same wifi network).  I would love to know if there is a way to create an ad hoc network from an iOS device and use it with a AppleTV on the road?   I do a lot of presenting it would replace PC projectors (and the associated wires) for presentations.

 

There is much, much more that can be done with Airplay going forward....

post #33 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

For the entire weekend? Probably 2 max.

The article doesn't spend enough time dissing Apple competitors, instead staying on topic for the most part, so no one really cares enough to comment.1wink.gif

Thanks for the predictably lame comment. Your narcissism always seems to escape you (but it certainly doesn't escape others).

Moving on.. As an avid fan of Apple and Apple products, this has been another very enjoyable article, both in outlining future product expectations, and in putting Apple in perspective among the belligerent anti apple rhetoric in the media at large.

I very much hope Apple does both, make an "iWatch" as well as open up space for further 3rd party hardware integration.

As for iOS, the notifications are good, but please give us a swipe up feature to access multitasking bar along with control panel (Bluetooth, wifi, brightness..) and possibly the widgets that people seem so fond of. Also, please improve siri's basic functionality. For example, when it can't understand my basic command to "call John," and it gives me several options, allow me to say, "call the third one," instead of forcing me to select one by touch, or have to repeat the name again, perpetuating a vicious cycle.

   

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post #34 of 162

What a mess of an editorial.  I thought it was supposed to be about iOS?  But I don't see any ideas or wishes for iOS going forward.  FAIL.

 

Personally I'd like to see:

 

*Re-designed UI that removes the ugly, and removes the unnecessary and ornamental kitsch.  I'm not saying copy Windows Phone 8 or Android, but there's a lot of well designed 3rd party apps on iOS that Apple could take cues from.

 

*Guest/Family user accounts (seems like a no-brainer to me)

 

*The ability for people to select default apps for mail, maps,  browsing etc.

 

*I'd like to see Siri become more predictive rather than me always having to ask it for information.  For instance if the traffic was really bad or there was an accident on the road I take to/from work, I'd love Siri to provide a notification warning me that traffic will be bad and providing an alternate route If necessary.

 

*Better 3rd party integration with iCloud and Siri; better use of Siri for common tasks.

 

*More actionable notification center, and quicker access to most commonly used settings - wi-fi, Bluetooth, brightness, etc.

 

*I'd love an intelligent way for wi-fi to turn on and off on my phone.  For example when I get to the office my iPhone automatically turns off wi-fi an then turns it back on again when I leave the office. Many times I've caught myself doing something non work related on company wi-fi, because I forgot to turn it off.

 

*Ability to turn off automatic loading of web pages as mobile or tablet.  I'm sure some will argue desktop versions of websites suck on mobile devices but a lot of the mobile versions are crap and don't provide all the functionally of a desktop site.  Plus it's a pain in the ass to have to locate the desktop version link (assuming the site had one). Just let me turn off that setting in Safari.

 

*A better way of organizing and managing apps.  Ability to move Newsstand into a folder.

 

*Better AppStore curation; improved AppStore and iTunes UI.

 

I'm sure there's lots I'm forgetting but this would be a good start IMO.

post #35 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by poke View Post

I want the following:

- app interoperability
- shared files in iCloud
- iWork update taking advantage of the above
- XCode on iOS
- displays with built-in AirPlay support

I want to be able to throw my Mac in the trash.
It will be interesting to see how they bring more functionality to iOS over the years as the hardware gets more powerful. I'm hoping the multi-user comes sooner rather than later. They could restrict this to the iPad, but I think it could even be handy on the iPhone.
Edited by TheUnfetteredMind - 3/31/13 at 7:11am
post #36 of 162
Apple Store for third party hardware? Currently very limiting and far too expensive, unpolished and lack of entries. Apple should better these to succeed.
post #37 of 162
Computers were stagnate? Phones have reached an app saturation point? Apple needs a new golden child? You lost me on those points!
Personally, I would like to see some useful widgets... for all my Apple devices...
Not intended to belittle your comments just totally taken back by them. I guess we see things completely different; people are like that you know...
post #38 of 162

I believe there is a good reason we have not had an announcement about OS X 10.9 yet. I strongly suspect that the integration between it an iOS 7 will be deep, so Apple cannot show off one without tipping their hand to the other. I therefore surmise that we will not see either until WWDC in June, with both of them scheduled to ship in the Fall (Sept/Oct). That will also be when the new MacPro and iPads will ship. The iPhone 6 will be announced at WWDC and delivered this summer (July) and be hardware-ready for the some of the new features coming in iOS 7 that only it can run. Apple will sell millions of phones immediately on iterative improvements to hardware and the promise of even more features once iOS 7 ships. Classic Apple.

post #39 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Now that iOS has drop-down notifications, obviously the next step will be to add widgets. :)

 

When someone finds an actual use for a widget then maybe they will. I have yet to find an Android user give me an example if a useful widget despite repeatedly asking.

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post #40 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheUnfetteredMind View Post


Certainly one of the most beautiful computers still to this day IMHO. I never owned one, but even as recent as last year was thinking of picking one up as an art piece.

 

A little bigger Cube would have been perfect, the shape is very efficient if used right.

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