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Fragmentation means nearly half of Android users won't get Facebook Home

post #1 of 70
Thread Starter 
The "openness" of Google's Android platform may have made Facebook's new Home experience possible, but the fragmented nature of the Android market means that nearly half of all Android users will be unable to run its new Home feature.

the crew
Facebook Home will initially be available for six phones.


Facebook Home will not run on Android 2.3 Gingerbread or lower, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg revealed today in a question-and-answer session following Home's unveiling. Initially released in February of 2011, Gingerbread is still the Android version for roughly 40 percent of the Android install base, according to Google's most recent figures. Roughly seven percent of Android devices run an older version of the OS.

The more than 50 percent of Android devices running either version 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich or versions 4.1 and 4.2 Jelly Bean will, presumably, be able to run Facebook Home, though likely not until some time after launch. Zuckerberg pointed out both during and after the Home presentation that the launcher will be reserved to six devices initially: the HTC One and One X, Samsung's Galaxy S III, S4, and Note II, and the just revealed HTC First, which is said to be optimized for the Facebook Home experience.

Further, the launcher will not be available for Android tablets until some time after launch. Facebook has said that it is working on Home for tablets.

yeah
Android version distribution, via Google.


Whereas Apple controls both the hardware and software underlying its iOS devices ? and thus has a much smaller set of configurations to develop for ? Google makes Android available to a wide array of manufacturers. Some of these manufacturers are diligent in updating their devices to recent versions of Android, but a large number aren't. Due to either technical limitations or fiscal infeasibility, hundreds of millions of Android devices are running a now two-years-outdated version of the operating system.

This fragmentation among the Android install base has proved a significant problem for developers, as they must program their apps not only to account for a vast array of hardware configurations, but also to account for 40 percent of their potential audience using a two-year-old OS. Google has been taking steps to address the fragmentation issue, trying to encourage manufacturers to update their devices, but even Google-owned Motorola has had to abandon update schedules for some handsets due to financial and development realities.
post #2 of 70

Hilarious.lol.gif

post #3 of 70
I tolerate Facebook because some family/friends don't want to venture out and try other social networking platforms. I see no reason to use "Home", so I can't say I'm devastated that Facebook's glorified bloatware won't run on my Galaxy Nexus right away.

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

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post #4 of 70

Zuckerberg unclear on iOS Facebook Home, says Android's openness allows unique experiences

 

 

 

 

 

LOL

 

Yes, a "unique" experience indeed. 

post #5 of 70

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 2:31pm
post #6 of 70
This article is a little bit silly and skewed. Facebook is right in not developing for older versions of Android, just like developers now do not support iOS 4 and lower. The real issue is the device carriers being able to control the releases of newer versions of Android keeping people from having more modern software on their phones, not that there are different versions of the Android OS.
post #7 of 70
Welcome to the all impressive Open Source world Everyone things is the next best thing to slide bread,
post #8 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

100% of iOS won't get FB Home either.

How does this Android news affect Apple?

Maybe I typed the wrong URL - is this AndroidInsider?

Android is a competitor with iOS, is it not?

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #9 of 70

I doubt most of those users care...

post #10 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post


Android is a competitor with iOS, is it not?

 

The thing is, I don't see how this article can be logically interpreted as anything but positive for Android and negative for iOS. 100% of iOS cannot run this software, and a large percentage of Android user base can run it due to Android's openness. (I don't know anything about FaceBook's "Home", other than what is said/implied in the above article. Edit: Therefore maybe some iOS version is in the works, I don't know).

post #11 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

100% of iOS won't get FB Home either.

How does this Android news affect Apple?

Maybe I typed the wrong URL - is this AndroidInsider?

You're right. Go somewhere else and don't come back.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #12 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post

I tolerate Facebook because some family/friends don't want to venture out and try other social networking platforms. I see no reason to use "Home", so I can't say I'm devastated that Facebook's glorified bloatware won't run on my Galaxy Nexus right away.

 

It is horrible that Facebook Home cannot run on the Galaxy Nexus!  This is the perfect reason for you to switch back to the iPhone!  ;-)

post #13 of 70

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 2:31pm
post #14 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

100% of iOS won't get FB Home either.

 

It's like the way that 45% of all iPhones ever sold can't use Siri.

 

Which is worse, millions who cannot use Siri, or millions who cannot use Facebook Home?

 

Neither seems like a huge tragedy.

post #15 of 70
Is "fragmentation" also the reason my iPhone 4 can't run Siri?

There are also a number of of apps/features that work on my phone that don't work on an iPhone 3.
post #16 of 70
``Zuckerberg unclear on iOS Facebook Home...''

Translated: There is no way in Hell Apple is giving us access to the top level of their UI for the iOS System.
post #17 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by curveddesign.com View Post

It is horrible that Facebook Home cannot run on the Galaxy Nexus!  This is the perfect reason for you to switch back to the iPhone!  ;-)

iPhone was my first choice, but my unlocked Galaxy Nexus was $300 cheaper than an unlocked iPhone at the time, and that $300 went towards more important things.

I haven't ruled out an iPhone purchase in the future. 1smile.gif

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #18 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

``Zuckerberg unclear on iOS Facebook Home...''

Translated: There is no way in Hell Apple is giving us access to the top level of their UI for the iOS System.

Who the hell would want this abortion anyway?  Do people really want Facebook to have access to all of their phone's information?

post #19 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

True, but a FaceBook widget is just a widget.

Do you expect AppleInsider to run stories on every Android widget that gets released?

I agree "Home" is a glorified bloatware widget, but considering Facebook has over 1 billion monthly active users, ANY feature or service that draws more of those users to a certain platform is probably newsworthy.

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #20 of 70

In actual Apple-related news, all iOS users won't get facebook home

post #21 of 70

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 2:31pm
post #22 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neo42 View Post

In actual Apple-related news, all iOS users won't get facebook home

And nothing of value was lost.

post #23 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

I think I missed that in the announcement. Where did you read that Apple's partner Facebook now has access to all Android user data?

Because one only has to look at what permissions their Android app already requires. It's no big logical leap to see they will want access to more data with this. You're honestly telling me that Facebook isn't using this thing to mine more data?

 

Also, what exactly does any affiliation that Apple has with Facebook have to do with this story? Looks like nothing more than a pathetic attempt at deflection.

post #24 of 70
More fragmentation. This is both good news and horrible news for Google. Now Facebook can coop Android; displaying advertising and offering their own services.


Let's not forget to mention that Google recently tweaked the methodology for displaying the version distribution. As result, many phones with older versions are not counted which immediately increased the version distribution in favor of Android 4.2 Jelly Bean by ten percent or more.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 4/4/13 at 1:55pm
post #25 of 70

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 2:31pm
post #26 of 70
The thing is, I don't see how this article can be logically interpreted as anything but positive for Android and negative for iOS. 100% of iOS cannot run this software, and a large percentage of Android user base can run it due to Android's openness.

Actually, even a lot of the newer versions of Android won't be able to fully run Facebook Home. It appears that it needs a custom version of Android to use some of the features that display notifications on the home screen. So even if you have a fairly new Samsung Galaxy III it won't be as simple as downloading an app and installing it. To fully support it you will have to upgrade your Android phone to run the modified version of Android. This is going to lead to even more fragmentation in the Android world.
post #27 of 70

I used to own a Motorola Cliq which ad Motoblur and included FaceBook built-in. It sounded nice at first, but quickly became just another annoying widget on my phone. It came to a point where I hardly ever used the motoblur portion of the phone. Unless you're a teeny-bopper who lives on facebook I don't see this going any further than motoblur did and that even included twitter. 

post #28 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by troehl View Post

The thing is, I don't see how this article can be logically interpreted as anything but positive for Android and negative for iOS. 100% of iOS cannot run this software, and a large percentage of Android user base can run it due to Android's openness.

Actually, even a lot of the newer versions of Android won't be able to fully run Facebook Home. It appears that it needs a custom version of Android to use some of the features that display notifications on the home screen. So even if you have a fairly new Samsung Galaxy III it won't be as simple as downloading an app and installing it. To fully support it you will have to upgrade your Android phone to run the modified version of Android. This is going to lead to even more fragmentation in the Android world.


So, users being directed away from Google services is positive?
post #29 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

Is "fragmentation" also the reason my iPhone 4 can't run Siri?

There are also a number of of apps/features that work on my phone that don't work on an iPhone 3.

 

iOS still has hands down better old device support than Android of any flavour, and an iPhone of any number is still more likely to run new software than any other phone.  

 

(I think that there should be a rule that this is appended to any comments of the "my old iPhone doesn't do this or that" variety).  

 

Also worth noting that the reason your old iPhone won't do this or that always has a hardware related reason that makes it impossible.  It's not an arbitrary limiting of the device or even just because they don't have the time or the inclination to support it.  

 

It kills me how many people complain about this stuff as if they had a valid complaint when they clearly do not.   Apple promises that if you buy a device from them that you will get two full number versions of software that run on it and all the point upgrades as well.  Often even though it isn't promised, you get three (and all the updates).  Again, more than any Android phone ever.  

post #30 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Again, more than any Android phone ever.  

Actually HTC's Droid Incredible and Thunderbolt have done exceptionally well in that regard.
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post #31 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by troehl View Post

The thing is, I don't see how this article can be logically interpreted as anything but positive for Android and negative for iOS. 100% of iOS cannot run this software, and a large percentage of Android user base can run it due to Android's openness.

How is it negative for iOS?  One of the main strengths of iOS is that carriers and phone makers can't slap bloatware shit like this on it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

What specific permissions did you see, and which Android device are you using?

 

And why did you choose that over an iPhone?

 

If you had taken a moment to actually read my post before rushing to click "Reply" you might have noted that I said nothing of the sort.

 

You made a claim, I asked for some supporting evidence.  If you don't have any that's fine, you're in good company on this site.  Just seemed a reasonable question at the time.

 

If you're among those who insist that Facebook is angel when partnering with Apple but nothing less than Satan himself when partnering with any other company, there's not much I can do for you.

Their permissions on Android want your location data, your SMS data, to read and modify your phone contacts, full network access, etc.  Also, my evidence of what they are using this for is based purely on looking at Facebook's history of actions, the data they collect and their business model which is mining all the data they can get from their users as a way to push ads.  To think they won't use this to obtain more data is the height of naivety.

 

Also, I didn't say Facebook is an angel at any point.  I specifically don't use the Facebook integration with iOS and would love to be able to completely nuke the feature. Your argument is a strawman and is nothing but a pathetic deflection.  


Edited by Applelunatic - 4/4/13 at 2:38pm
post #32 of 70

Curious which recent Android handsets aren't running Jelly Bean for legitimate (i.e performance, hardware) reasons?  Seems to me the reasons are more arbitrary.  Whereas with Apple it's more about what the hardware can support.  I remember when I had an HTC phone trying to figure out when my handset was going to be updated with the latest version of Froyo was so frustrating.  I'd contact HTC who would tell me to call AT&T.  I'd call AT&T who would tell me I need to call HTC.  *^%! mess.

post #33 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Also worth noting that the reason your old iPhone won't do this or that always has a hardware related reason that makes it impossible.  It's not an arbitrary limiting of the device or even just because they don't have the time or the inclination to support it.  

What hardware limitation for not supporting Siri in iphone 4? And Siri came out less than a year after I bought the latest iphone at that time.
post #34 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takeiteasy View Post

What hardware limitation for not supporting Siri in iphone 4? And Siri came out less than a year after I bought the latest iphone at that time.

Honestly I don't think Siri was ready to handle the millions of existing iPhone 4 users on it's system.
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post #35 of 70

Good. The last thing I want is Facebook all over my home screen. Although my phones (Galaxy Nexus and Nexus 4) probably will be included.

 

I hope they maintain the traditional Facebook app, because I do like Facebook sometimes, when it's in its place. I'm not thrilled about the increasingly always-on social networking on device after device.

 

nb. I own an iPad, so I'm not just an interloper. :)

post #36 of 70

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 2:30pm
post #37 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Yes, we understand that you're fond of the word "deflection" and that you know how to spell it correctly, even if you don't know what it means.  Note that the first word of my sentence you're responding to there was "if"; if not, of course, that wouldn't apply to you.

On the contrary, your post here is among the very few that raises concerns about Apple choice in partnering with Facebook.  I don't share the same degree of dread over Apple's choices as you do, but I respect your opinion.

With FB I haven't seen anything all that different from the sort of thing AppleInsider does:  collecting eyeballs and using tracking cookies like admeld, adnxs and others to sell demographic profiles of those eyeballs.  All ad-based services operate like that.

While the regulars here have no problem with AI's use of these things, when Apple's partner Facebook uses them it's considered something of a concern.  I don't understand it myself, but no one requires me to so we're all happy.

Who says I don't have a problem with what they do? You're once again making things up and ascribing them to me as if I believe it. I use things like Ghostery to block all the scripts and everything else that AppleInsider tries to load because I don't like the tracking and privacy intrusion.
Edited by Applelunatic - 4/4/13 at 3:12pm
post #38 of 70
Facebook & google, what dogsh*t business models!
post #39 of 70

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/23/13 at 2:35pm
post #40 of 70
Translation: "Muh butt is hurt".
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