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Apple tweaks its online store with new touch-friendly scrollable menu bar

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Apple's online store was temporarily unavailable overnight as the company tweaked its design, making it more touch-friendly with a quickly scrollable menu bar on product category pages.

Store


While the main page remains the same, users can click on one of Apple's four product categories ??Mac, iPad, iPhone and iPod ? to see the new menu bar. For example, on the Mac page, products such as the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro are displayed first, but more content is available by scrolling to the right, including certified refurbished models, and Macs for both business and education.

On a Mac, users can see the additional items by simply clicking an arrow to the right of the menu. But on an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch, the menu is a touch-friendly element within the page, and can be scrolled to the left and right with a simple swipe.

Store


Beyond the new scrolling menus, some individual product category pages have also become easier to view and tap on a device like an iPhone. As noted by Macotakara on Friday, while products were previously displayed in a list form, they are now shown with a large product image.

For example, a search for "iPad cases" on the store returns a list of products in a grid form. Images of the individual products can be clicked or swiped through on the same page, without the need to tap on and load a separate product page.
post #2 of 21

When the mouse dies in a few years, I wonder how the Internet will handle the loss of the hover state.

 

I certainly won't miss it for the menus that use it, but what becomes of "alt text"?

post #3 of 21

Possible hints of future OS X and IOS UI?

post #4 of 21
Originally Posted by ReedZ View Post
Possible hints of future OS X and IOS UI?

 

Do you mean in the design or the operation? I figure the operation is already in iOS.

post #5 of 21
I find it surprising that Apple does not have a website that displays better on a mobile device. They cram the same contents in a small screen as they do on a laptop or iMac. The company that sells the most mobile devices in the world must have the odd employee checking on their own website using their own devices from time to time, and realize, "Hmm, we need a more responsible design!"

In this respect, they are a serious laggard.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

When the mouse dies in a few years, I wonder how the Internet will handle the loss of the hover state.

 

I certainly won't miss it for the menus that use it, but what becomes of "alt text"?


You can still hover with your finger. A lot of touchscreens do that now. The GS4 does it, even if it isn't very responsive for the moment.

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

When the mouse dies in a few years, I wonder how the Internet will handle the loss of the hover state.

I certainly won't miss it for the menus that use it, but what becomes of "alt text"?

I think the mouse has a lot of life left in it. Touch screens need to be a lot more accurate and responsive before power users will give the mouse up.

Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.

(I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.)

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post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

When the mouse dies in a few years, I wonder how the Internet will handle the loss of the hover state.

 

I certainly won't miss it for the menus that use it, but what becomes of "alt text"?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzguru View Post


I think the mouse has a lot of life left in it. Touch screens need to be a lot more accurate and responsive before power users will give the mouse up.

 

Score one for biology or nature if the computer mouse dies while the real mice keep thriving.

post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

When the mouse dies in a few years, I wonder how the Internet will handle the loss of the hover state.

I certainly won't miss it for the menus that use it, but what becomes of "alt text"?

The same thing that happened to Control and Fn keys and 80-column text consoles.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #10 of 21

Apple's iOS really needs to have a better way to scroll through long documents and web pages. When the iPhone was first introduced, nobody expected to be scrolling through documents that are dozens or even hundreds of pages long on a phone screen. Endlessly flicking your finger, even with "intertial scrolling", is not an elegant solution for scrolling through many pages. With features like reading pdf files and "full desktop internet on your phone", the limitations of endless finger flicking are painfully obvious.  While the iPad's larger screen helps a little, it still does not fully address the issue.

 

I've seen Android phones where when you start swiping the page and the scrollbar appears, you can move the scrollbar with your finger before the scrollbar fades away. I'm not sure if this is a standard feature of Android or a result of "fragmentation" by device manufacturers, but I would like to see this feature in iOS.  Now I'm expecting some guys here to respond with "iOS is perfect. It's the author's fault for writing long documents", "We don't need anything from Android" or "Just don't scroll that way".


Edited by Haggar - 4/5/13 at 10:59am
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

Apple's iOS really needs to have a better way to scroll through long documents and web pages. When the iPhone was first introduced, nobody expected to be scrolling through documents that are dozens or even hundreds of pages long on a phone screen. Endlessly flicking your finger, even with "intertial scrolling", is not an elegant solution for scrolling through many pages. With features like reading pdf files and "full desktop internet on your phone", the limitations of endless finger flicking are painfully obvious.  While the iPad's larger screen helps a little, it still does not fully address the issue.

I've seen Android phones where when you start swiping the page and the scrollbar appears, you can move the scrollbar with your finger before the scrollbar fades away. I'm not sure if this is a standard feature of Android or a result of "fragmentation" by device manufacturers, but I would like to see this feature in iOS.  Now I'm expecting some guys here to respond with "iOS is perfect. It's the author's fault for writing long documents", "We don't need anything from Android" or "Just don't scroll that way".

It is fair to say and surprising to observe that Apple has not made substantial improvement to its physics and gesture engine in the last while.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

Apple's iOS really needs to have a better way to scroll through long documents and web pages. When the iPhone was first introduced, nobody expected to be scrolling through documents that are dozens or even hundreds of pages long on a phone screen. Endlessly flicking your finger, even with "intertial scrolling", is not an elegant solution for scrolling through many pages. With features like reading pdf files and "full desktop internet on your phone", the limitations of endless finger flicking are painfully obvious.  While the iPad's larger screen helps a little, it still does not fully address the issue.

 

I've seen Android phones where when you start swiping the page and the scrollbar appears, you can move the scrollbar with your finger before the scrollbar fades away. I'm not sure if this is a standard feature of Android or a result of "fragmentation" by device manufacturers, but I would like to see this feature in iOS.  Now I'm expecting some guys here to respond with "iOS is perfect. It's the author's fault for writing long documents", "We don't need anything from Android" or "Just don't scroll that way".

 

Web pages shouldn't do that, that is poor design unless it is auto loading at the bottom which a scroll function wouldn't be able to predict how long the page would be, not a way to specifically jump to one section (see coolhunting.com). Open up your Contacts app, scroll a bit and you will see letters appear on the right hand side of your screen. You can click on those to jump to a section such as contacts that start with the letter "R", the music app does this too. iBooks, also, has dots on the bottom that allows you to scroll quickly though hundreds of pages. You can add any PDFs you like there as well.

you are welcome /s

It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
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It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

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post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by websnap View Post

 

Web pages shouldn't do that, that is poor design unless it is auto loading at the bottom which a scroll function wouldn't be able to predict how long the page would be, not a way to specifically jump to one section (see coolhunting.com). Open up your Contacts app, scroll a bit and you will see letters appear on the right hand side of your screen. You can click on those to jump to a section such as contacts that start with the letter "R", the music app does this too. iBooks, also, has dots on the bottom that allows you to scroll quickly though hundreds of pages. You can add any PDFs you like there as well.

you are welcome /s

I think you are focusing on his post too literally. The lesson I take from his words is that touch-based navigation can improve on iOS (and elsewhere). As someone mentioned, physics and gestures could be improved.

 

I think we can all benefit from taking the positive from other people's post rather than looking for cracks to spread open, and the patting ourselves for making others look foolish (or believing that we did). Don't you agree?

 

You are welcome.

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

Apple's iOS really needs to have a better way to scroll through long documents and web pages. .

 

Yes.  Removing scrollbars altogether was a classic example of "throwing the baby out with the bath water".

 

As you noted, others quickly realized this and many apps now have scrollbars that appear when flicking.

 

E.g. when scrolling through hundreds of TV channels on Optimum's app.

post #15 of 21
uote:
Originally Posted by websnap View Post

 

Web pages shouldn't do that, that is poor design unless it is auto loading at the bottom which a scroll function wouldn't be able to predict how long the page would be, not a way to specifically jump to one section (see coolhunting.com). Open up your Contacts app, scroll a bit and you will see letters appear on the right hand side of your screen. You can click on those to jump to a section such as contacts that start with the letter "R", the music app does this too. iBooks, also, has dots on the bottom that allows you to scroll quickly though hundreds of pages. You can add any PDFs you like there as well.

you are welcome /s

 

First, not every web page in the world is formatted for the iPhone or iPad screen, nor is it reasonable to expect that.  But I suppose you'll blame all the authors in the world for not reformatting all webpages in existence.  Second, what happens if you zoom in on a PDF on an iPhone screen?  Now the PDF expands both horizontally and vertically.  Do you suggest having two sets of dots now, one for horizontal and another for vertical?  Remember, PDF's may consist of more than just text with vector fonts.  Are you suggesting that applications start modifying the original PDF, reformating and renumbering pages whenever you change magnification?  Perhaps also chopping images into multiple pieces and putting them onto different pages?  Wait, let me guess... It's the author's fault again for not knowing what size every individual person wants to use?

 

And scrolling through long email messages or email folders?  Again, I suppose you will blame others for writing long email messages or for having lots of messages in their inbox.

 

How about scrolling through long notes in Notes app?  Again, I suppose your answer is "Just don't write that much"?

 

Long lists in the Reminders app?  I know... "Just don't add so many items".

 

you are welcome


Edited by Haggar - 4/5/13 at 2:18pm
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Yes.  Removing scrollbars altogether was a classic example of "throwing the baby out with the bath water".

 

As you noted, others quickly realized this and many apps now have scrollbars that appear when flicking.

 

E.g. when scrolling through hundreds of TV channels on Optimum's app.

 

To be fair, iOS does have scrollbars which appear (Mail, Notes, Safari, and others). But you can't move the scrollbars like you can on Android, or on Mac OS.

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReedZ View Post

Possible hints of future OS X and IOS UI?

I believe Apple is slowing merging iOS and OS X into one universal OS that'll work on both their computers and mobile devices
post #18 of 21
Originally Posted by btracy713 View Post
I believe Apple is slowing merging iOS and OS X into one universal OS that'll work on both their computers and mobile devices

 

I believe Apple is slowing merging iOS and OS X into an OS with as much unified interaction as possible across both computers and mobile devices. There are many things that will never be possible on a desktop that will on an iPad and just as many vice versa.

 

That's what I think, anyway.

post #19 of 21

Cannot believe we are in the 4th month of 2013 and there is no new products from Apple or even hardware updates.

post #20 of 21
Originally Posted by DarenDino View Post
Cannot believe we are in the 4th month of 2013 and there is no new products from Apple or even hardware updates.

 

They're obviously doomed.

post #21 of 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

 

First, not every web page in the world is formatted for the iPhone or iPad screen, nor is it reasonable to expect that.  But I suppose you'll blame all the authors in the world for not reformatting all webpages in existence.  Second, what happens if you zoom in on a PDF on an iPhone screen?  Now the PDF expands both horizontally and vertically.  Do you suggest having two sets of dots now, one for horizontal and another for vertical?  Remember, PDF's may consist of more than just text with vector fonts.  Are you suggesting that applications start modifying the original PDF, reformating and renumbering pages whenever you change magnification?  Perhaps also chopping images into multiple pieces and putting them onto different pages?  Wait, let me guess... It's the author's fault again for not knowing what size every individual person wants to use?

 

And scrolling through long email messages or email folders?  Again, I suppose you will blame others for writing long email messages or for having lots of messages in their inbox.

 

How about scrolling through long notes in Notes app?  Again, I suppose your answer is "Just don't write that much"?

 

Long lists in the Reminders app?  I know... "Just don't add so many items".

 

you are welcome

 

lol, wow some hostility, Hagger and stelligent, it seems no one recognizes sarcasm (/s) when they see it. Since you posed different questions then what you are continuing here, and you asked so nicely and without bias this first time ("Now I'm expecting some guys here to respond with "iOS is perfect. It's the author's fault for writing long documents", "We don't need anything from Android" or "Just don't scroll that way".") I will explain what I meant.

First of all, large, detailed documents aren't best seen with a phone. I know, that's obvious and seems like a cop-out but it isn't. I'm not talking about websites specifically (though, some info heavy sites could use a detect script along with CSS modifications - I, like may developers, have on our corporate site) but you can't honestly be reading long briefs in a pdf on a phone and think, well, if only it had better scrollers this document would be a cinch to read. That's not been the case with myself or the experience we get from the people we've created a paperless infrastructure for. It's not just navigation traits, it using the right device for the job for optimal usage. That last part is the most important. Optimal usage. There is a reason why responsive design is so popular right now, the devices people are using to see content are shrinking so the gap for optimal usage needs to shrink as well. 

My first post answered the issues you brought up. Documents with many pages can be easily sorted through in bulk or as an individual file with many, many pages. Using iBooks, you can file, sort and search many documents and once in one, you can jump directly to a page. If the text is vector, you can search for terms within any given document. These are fantastic solutions I use all the time with manuals and receipts. Your issue seems to be scrolling and, unfortunately, it is the number one nav trait on a touch screen besides taping. To say you scroll too much is like saying you move your curser too much on a desktop environment. For some scenarios, you just need to scroll. I have yet to see a solution that is intuitive to get through miles long emails while keeping a firm understanding about context besides scrolling because on a small screen, you can't see what you are skipping past.

This old trope that if Apple doesn't do it, you are "doing it wrong, holding it wrong or it's just someone else's fault" is really played out and makes you seem like a fanboi, even if you are saying it to avoid fanbois. The fact of the matter is that it sounds like you want to be able to read large amounts of information in piece-meal bites on a tiny screen without having to scroll much and that isn't possible without sacrificing one of theses three (small bites of info/small screen/no scrolling). When you zoom in on a PDF, to see a graphic better or whatever the case may be, you pinch back out to normal size and carry on with your document. I don't see what any modification would be needing to happen. Again, when I have issues looking for something in email or in documents, it's not the system I that upsets me after a while, it's the display. Maybe that's just me.

I'm sorry but it sounds like while there may be some space to improve, maybe a scroll and hold feature that zooms past content of you scroll up/down and hold at the top/bottom, but even then, on a small screen, you are not going to be able to actually see what's going by (if the phone can even render that quickly). You pounce on me for excuses I hadn't even made ("Just don't write that much") when I never said any of that, you seemed to be looking for push back. I wasn't giving any, just examples of solutions I've found that are built right in.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

I think you are focusing on his post too literally. The lesson I take from his words is that touch-based navigation can improve on iOS (and elsewhere). As someone mentioned, physics and gestures could be improved.

 

I think we can all benefit from taking the positive from other people's post rather than looking for cracks to spread open, and the patting ourselves for making others look foolish (or believing that we did). Don't you agree?

 

You are welcome.

 

 

Seriously? I focusing on his answer too literally? I'm supposed to just glean the abstract portion of the question? I think it is really obvious that iOS and as an extension, touch-based navigation can and will improve over time and with many people adding input. We will get more gestures and the API's will be distributed so that others can include it in their apps, ensuring wide acceptance. He said there wasn't an easier way to absorb large amounts of info without endlessly scrolling, and I corrected him (and even ignored the expectation that I would blast something from android, which I didn't). I wasn't "looking for cracks to spread open", nor was I "patting myself in the back", I was trying to be helpful to someone who may not have been a power user. And please, give me a break about "taking the positive of other's people's posts". You obviously didn't for mine.

Both of you, for future reference, /s= sarcasm (my last line was sarcastic). I mean no sarcasm in this post though, just an FYI.


Edited by websnap - 4/8/13 at 11:39am
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
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It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

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