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Editorial: Apple's market disruption savvy is bad news for Android - Page 4

post #121 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Will it verbally tell me what is a nuclear power plant? 

Of course not. I guess you miss the point. Rather than just offering the link to someone else's answer Google is trying to supply the actual answer itself in some cases. It all likelihood it will only get better at doing so. It's already a great deal faster than competing services when Google has the verbal answer available.
Edited by Gatorguy - 4/7/13 at 3:00pm
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post #122 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Of course not. I guess you miss the point. Rather than just offering the link to someone else's answer Google is trying to supply the actual answer itself in some cases. It all likelihood it will only get better at doing so. It's already a great deal faster than competing services when Google has the verbal answer available.

Do you know Google Now is catching up to Siri which is first?  

post #123 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

Why don't you just answer the fucking question?

I already did in my initial response which clearly shows services that Apple provides than Google does not, and have eluded to Google supplying cloud services that Apple does not. If you can't see there is absolutely no variation between Apple and Google's cloud services then the question is: What is "fucking" wrong with comprehension.

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post #124 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Do you know Google Now is catching up to Siri which is that first?  

I'm not sure what you mean by "catching up to Siri which is that first". Could you be a little more specific? To me they look like two different beasts. There's thing's things Google Now and Google Voice Search does that Siri does not and vice-versa. In what way is Siri first?
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post #125 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Do you know Google Now is catching up to Siri which is first?  

It's never good to play the "first" card as that has no bearing on quality. Google Now and Samsung S Voice are playing catch-up to Siri as a well rounded integrated digital personal assistance but in many ways Google has jumped in with foundations of Google Now years before Apple with GOOG-411. That was over 3 years of getting voice patterns and queries. On top of that search suggestions in Google are more than enough proof that Google has long since understood what users likely want from a search.

That said, I don't think many knew about it and therefore it's usage was probably considerably less than what experiences with Siri on any given day. Apple also bought Siri which is based off of decades of AI development from SRI, that used and uses Nuance voice-to-text.

The bottom line is each have their pros and cons. What Apple has done in a short time is impressive but what Google has done to catch up with Siri the service is also impressive. I prefer Siri overall but there are aspects of Google Now I like. For instance, the text-to-speech seems more natural and not having to click a link that then opens up in Safari (assuming you don't need to first input your PIN) if a web page for the service needs to be shown is a huge gaffe, IMO. Outside of that I think Apple's is cleaner, smoother, and overall more accurately. I've seen speed vary widely between Google Now and Siri so it's hard to examine where the issue for that resides as there are too many variables.
Edited by SolipsismX - 4/7/13 at 4:00pm

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post #126 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not sure what you mean by "catching up to Siri which is that first". Could you be a little more specific? To me they look like two different beasts. There's thing's things Google Now and Google Voice Search does that Siri does not and vice-versa. In what way is Siri first?

It's pretty obvious that Google Now, Samsung S-Voice, and MS TellMe are direct competitors to Siri. Siri was first and the others raced to get their own service to their respective OSes, or in the UI shell of Android in the case of Samsung. As I stated previously, only Google Now seems to have anything that resembles a competent competitor to Siri and in some ways appears better, but they are direct competitors.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #127 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It's pretty obvious that Google Now, Samsung S-Voice, and MS TellMe are direct competitors to Siri. Siri was first and the others raced to get their own service to their respective OSes, or in the UI shell of Android in the case of Samsung. As I stated previously, only Google Now seems to have anything that resembles a competent competitor to Siri and in some ways appears better, but they are direct competitors.

I agree they're often compared. I was simply curious whether the OP meant "first" in the sense of a timeline or first in some other ways. Thanks for the mention of TellMe as well. I wasn't even aware MS had their own voice search version.
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post #128 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Will it verbally tell me what is a nuclear power plant? 

Wow. Google Now does verbally tell me what a nuclear power plant is. Color me surprised.1eek.gif
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post #129 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I agree they're often compared. Thanks for the mention of TellMe as well. I wasn't even aware MS had their own voice search version.

1) Calling it a voice search engine is really just an aspect of the more formal service of the intelligent personal assistant or digital personal assistant. A voice search would simply be a speech-to-text engine that then relays the converted text to the search engine, but these services are more intelligent; the service will interpret the text and then push it to sub-servics like Yelp (local businesses info), Rotten Tomatoes (movie info), Wolfram Alpha (math and science info), Yahoo! (sports(?) and news), etc. It's only when there is no match to the other sub-services does it then shoot it out to a general search engine search based on the speech-to-text results. That is what Apple bought with Siri, then expanded upon greatly along with integrating it into the OS, and that's what Google et al. are playing catch-up too.

2) You don't remember this gem? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHoukZpMhDE&t=29s
Edited by SolipsismX - 4/7/13 at 5:56pm

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #130 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


2) You don't remember this gem? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHoukZpMhDE&t=29s

The first MS result is hilarious:lol:

Nope, I'd never seen it before now. Thank you sir!
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post #131 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


I agree they're often compared. I was simply curious whether the OP meant "first" in the sense of a timeline or first in some other ways. Thanks for the mention of TellMe as well. I wasn't even aware MS had their own voice search version.

Like I said before Wikipedia is providing FACTs more and more.

"In late 2011, reports surfaced that Google was developing a virtual assistant for the next version of Android, similar to Apple's Siri."

"On June 27, 2012, Google Now was unveiled as part of the premier demonstration of Android 4.1 Jelly Bean at the Google I/O.[3]"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Now

post #132 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Apple has one thing left to do to truly become independent with the best platform in the world.
...and that is to provide it's own default search engine and perhaps make Google a search an option like Bing and Yahoo.
Once that is done, it will have full control of it's platform and a much better integrated search engine.

Apple's Market Disruption Savvy comes from its research teams, but also from it's independence in platform integration and design.
Apple can make its moves without asking permission, and when a technology needed for an Apple product does not exist, it gets invented and patented.

Agreed, and I have been thinking exactly the same thing. With all their data center capacity and base of Safari users they could make a big entry into the search market overnight. They could take it a step farther and really 'disrupt' Google though - Google has been doing their own disruption by giving away software and services that others have traditionally sold in exchange for collecting user data that they then use to sell advertising, so that their only major source of revenue is their search based advertising. Everything else is essentially a loss leader for them. Apple on the other hand makes their money through traditional direct sales to end users of hardware, software, and services. They could provide a search rival to Google almost as an after thought. With iAd, they already have an Internet advertising structure in place. What would get really interesting is if Apple decide to give the advertising away for free and undercut to the point of zero Google's pricing on their primary revenue source just like Google has done to everyone else in the markers they've entered. It would be interesting to see if Google could even survive.
post #133 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

I am not sure what you are saying, but if I scrape up my pennies and by a Porsche Carrera 4, it is psychologically very difficult for me to decide that I would have been happier with a Camry.

Yes but if something breaks in the Porsche you'll be more unsatisfied since you spent all that money. You get what you pay for.
post #134 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

No, most people would rationalize it away, claiming that the Porsche user experience is superior (this is not hypothetical -- Camrys are, in fact, much more reliable, but people do buy Porsches. For a lot more money).

I don't think most people will rationalize it away if they spent good money on something and that something fails or breaks.
post #135 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by X38 View Post

Agreed, and I have been thinking exactly the same thing. With all their data center capacity and base of Safari users they could make a big entry into the search market overnight. They could take it a step farther and really 'disrupt' Google though - Google has been doing their own disruption by giving away software and services that others have traditionally sold in exchange for collecting user data that they then use to sell advertising, so that their only major source of revenue is their search based advertising. Everything else is essentially a loss leader for them. Apple on the other hand makes their money through traditional direct sales to end users of hardware, software, and services. They could provide a search rival to Google almost as an after thought. With iAd, they already have an Internet advertising structure in place. What would get really interesting is if Apple decide to give the advertising away for free and undercut to the point of zero Google's pricing on their primary revenue source just like Google has done to everyone else in the markers they've entered. It would be interesting to see if Google could even survive.

I have been wondering what the sudden explosion of interest in data centers is regarding at Apple. This isn't just the data center in Maiden, North Carolina. As we know, Apple is constructing data centers in Hong Kong; Prineville, Oregon; and Reno, Nevada.


Hong Kong ("unprecedented scale") groundbreaking rumored in 1Q2013
Newark, CA (108,000 square feet) acquired in 2006
Maiden, NC (500,000 square feet with 184,000 square feet of actual data center floor space)
Prineville, OR (projected for 338,000 square feet)
Reno, NV
Santa Clara, CA (estimated to be to about 11,000 square feet of data center floor space) seven year lease signed in April 2011


Additionally, a mysterious company has been courting officials in Altoona, Iowa. Notably, one of the proposed zoning amendments would allow the operator of the data center to use on-site generation from solar panels, fuel cells and wind energy; a configuration thus far only used by Apple and eBay. Interestingly, this would easily be the second largest data center in the world.

Altoona, IA ??? (350,000 square-foot building and two buildings at 380,000 square feet total of 1.4 million square feet)
post #136 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Suppose you have an iTunes library of music. Good luck playing it on an android device. Of course, you can export the mp3s, but that's a pain. If you have a better way, do tell.

Uhm... why would I not just copy the AAC iTunes files onto an android device and play them? You do know that iTunes music has been DRM-free for years, right?

 

Or I could just download an android-compatible media server app that reads the music and serves them directly from my iTunes library?

post #137 of 150

Did Steve Jobs babble about being "disruptive"?  No, he just led Apple to make great, market-defining products.

 

If we call every successful product innnovation "disruptive" then we're not talking about innovation, we're talking about symantics.

post #138 of 150

There are tons of articles out there on how to do this easily.

 

How to play iTunes music and videos on your Android phone list options from copying, to using Google Music, to tools such as DoubleTwist to sync between your phone and iTunes.

 

Caveat:  I don't have a big iTunes collection, so never had to use any tools.

post #139 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

That is precisely what I suggested -- copying over the MP3s. It is a bit cumbersome (most of mine are in Apple Lossless, which is really FLAC with goofy headers, bleah). For most people I am guessing this is difficult. If you have an Amazon music service, you can play on a device of your choice with no hacking.

I thought Android users love hacking?
post #140 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

I thought Android users love hacking?

 

Some do, same as many iOS users who like to jailbreak and customize.

 

Personally, most of the Android users I know are women in their thirties with kids, who have no time or interest in hacking.

 

They just like the widgets and notifications and big screens.

post #141 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

I thought Android users love hacking?

Android users only like hacking when supporting their argument.
post #142 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Apple has one thing left to do to truly become independent with the best platform in the world.

...and that is to provide it's own default search engine and perhaps make Google a search an option like Bing and Yahoo.

Once that is done, it will have full control of it's platform and a much better integrated search engine.

 

Apple's Market Disruption Savvy comes from its research teams, but also from it's independence in platform integration and design.

Apple can make its moves without asking permission, and when a technology needed for an Apple product does not exist, it gets invented and patented.

AppleSauce, I have been thinking the same and have suggested the idea elsewhere and am always shot down that it would be small minded of Apple and Apple doesn't work that way. But I wan't trying to push a mean point, I am only trying to look at reality.

 

Google sets its sights on others and starts firing. I do not see why Apple should not respond. More search is done by Apple i products than by Android products. Sounds like Google is shooting at the wrong horse. I see no problem with Apple either having its own search engine, one run like its stores, on margins that make it complementary for advertisers to use its services over the pricier service of Google; or having a search site that protects i identities like Start Page that becomes the madam between the customer and the princess. The first of these strategies would either force Google to compete on price or to give in and strike a deal with Apple. The second would make migraine sound like a day at the beach for Maid Larry and cohorts.

 

Regardless, Apple could eventually make a small income from search as it now does from its music and app stores. This is not tit-for-tat but rather a game that has been  legitimised by Google and Amazon. It sure would be interesting to see what happens when goose and gander come into play.

 

Daniel sure makes some fine points in whatever he posts.


Edited by mhikl - 4/8/13 at 7:16pm

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post #143 of 150
A search engine isn't the answer. Apple does not want to promote competitors. It should work with bing or yahoo or duckduckgo then drop google search.
post #144 of 150

Speaking of GPS and phones, a California appellate court has ruled that using just the phone's GPS or map while driving, is a moving violation.

 

 

post #145 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Speaking of GPS and phones, a California appellate court has ruled that using just the phone's GPS or map while driving, is a moving violation.


Calif. Court Upholds Ticket for Phone GPS Use While Driving

In Australia, specifically New South Wales, I can use my phone's GPS provided it is mounted in a dock, apart from that a driver is not allowed to touch a phone unless handing it to a passenger.
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post #146 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Speaking of GPS and phones, a California appellate court has ruled that using just the phone's GPS or map while driving, is a moving violation.


Calif. Court Upholds Ticket for Phone GPS Use While Driving

Not actually. The person was holding the phone looking at a map while driving. If he set it to turn by turn navigation and set it on the fash and forget it, he would have been ok.
post #147 of 150
"At the same time, despite having ignored the bottom of the mobile phone market Apple has still managed to retain iPod-style ecosystem dominance over mobile apps and the usage stats that drive supporting accessory sales and specialty markets such as government, education and enterprise."

Simply not true. The Android app ecosystem, while having it's faults, can clearly go toe-to-toe with iOS. Also, the rest of the smart phone ecosystem for me and many others is actually quite a lot nicer on the Android side of the fence. Why? Choice. On the iOS side, you take Apple's solution (iCloud, iCal, Address Book, iPhoto etc), and you love them or... you learn to love them. On the Android side you and pick and choose what services you want. With Android you can move between phones from different vendors quite easily. With Apple, you're stuck. This works in Apple's favor to an extent, but for some people it's actually a disincentive to jump whole-hog into the Apple camp.

So, this article is obviously written by someone who doesn't understand the up-sides of Android. The Galaxy III and IV are not "low end phones." There are many high end Android phones that stack up remarkably well, and in some cases surpass the iPhone.

The real problem is that Apple is finding it harder to differentiate itself from the masses of Android phones out there. The iPhone is better at some things. Android is better at some other things. Hold them at arm's length they are about feature equivalent. The disruption has already occurred. What we're seeing now is a maturing market. The market is big enough for both Apple and others to continue to thrive. This is different from the nascent MP3 player market that the iPod effectively swallowed whole. The smart-phone market is vast with many different needs, price points, form factors and trade-offs. Android is good for consumers because it allows much more choice. Apple said "7 inch tablets are awful" Manufacturers came out with 7" Android tablets. Apple now makes a smaller tablet. The same thing is probably about to happen with screen size from the other direction with the iPhone. In other words, having a large thriving Android world allows for more experimentation in the market, giving consumers more options and a more open app and data ecosystem.
post #148 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by graxspoo View Post

"At the same time, despite having ignored the bottom of the mobile phone market Apple has still managed to retain iPod-style ecosystem dominance over mobile apps and the usage stats that drive supporting accessory sales and specialty markets such as government, education and enterprise."

Simply not true. The Android app ecosystem, while having it's faults, can clearly go toe-to-toe with iOS. Also, the rest of the smart phone ecosystem for me and many others is actually quite a lot nicer on the Android side of the fence. Why? Choice. On the iOS side, you take Apple's solution (iCloud, iCal, Address Book, iPhoto etc), and you love them or... you learn to love them. On the Android side you and pick and choose what services you want. With Android you can move between phones from different vendors quite easily. With Apple, you're stuck. This works in Apple's favor to an extent, but for some people it's actually a disincentive to jump whole-hog into the Apple camp.

So, this article is obviously written by someone who doesn't understand the up-sides of Android. The Galaxy III and IV are not "low end phones." There are many high end Android phones that stack up remarkably well, and in some cases surpass the iPhone.

The real problem is that Apple is finding it harder to differentiate itself from the masses of Android phones out there. The iPhone is better at some things. Android is better at some other things. Hold them at arm's length they are about feature equivalent. The disruption has already occurred. What we're seeing now is a maturing market. The market is big enough for both Apple and others to continue to thrive. This is different from the nascent MP3 player market that the iPod effectively swallowed whole. The smart-phone market is vast with many different needs, price points, form factors and trade-offs. Android is good for consumers because it allows much more choice. Apple said "7 inch tablets are awful" Manufacturers came out with 7" Android tablets. Apple now makes a smaller tablet. The same thing is probably about to happen with screen size from the other direction with the iPhone. In other words, having a large thriving Android world allows for more experimentation in the market, giving consumers more options and a more open app and data ecosystem.


Hahahahaha.
post #149 of 150
Originally Posted by graxspoo View Post
…the rest of the smart phone ecosystem for me and many others is actually quite a lot nicer on the Android side of the fence… …There are many high end Android phones that stack up remarkably well, and in some cases surpass the iPhone… …The real problem is that Apple is finding it harder to differentiate itself from the masses of Android phones out there… …Hold them at arm's length they are about feature equivalent… …The disruption has already occurred… …Android is good for consumers because it allows much more choice… 

 

I challenge someone to post something funnier. This made my day.


Apple said "7 inch tablets are awful" Manufacturers came out with 7" Android tablets. Apple now makes a smaller tablet.


I like how you not only change up the order of things here but also completely change the argument by the time you hit the end of the second sentence. 

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #150 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

Not actually. The person was holding the phone looking at a map while driving. If he set it to turn by turn navigation and set it on the fash and forget it, he would have been ok.

I was just talking about this the week before and making a joke of being able to play WwF on my iPhone whilst driving so long as I wasn't texting.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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