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Editorial: Apple's market disruption savvy is bad news for Android - Page 3

post #81 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

I'm in Australia the telecoms basically operate the same as AT&T, Verizon, etc, we are NOT part of the USA.

Is Android phone market share in Australia as big as in the third world nations or as in the US?  If it is later then my point is proved. 

post #82 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by swaylon View Post

I was at AT&T yesterday upgrading my mom from a feature phone to the iPhone 5 and I witnessed this in action. A middle-aged woman walked in the door and even though there was a sea of Android devices that were bigger, newer, and bidding for her attention, she was on a mission. She bought the iPhone 4 with 8GB; just what her son wanted. Apple can take this market if it wants; it remains to be seen whether they want to enter it seriously or not. To Author: Great points, by the way, in every respect

 

I'll bet there were certain apps the son wanted, hence the value of the Apple ecosystem. Apple iPhones have a certain cachét also. Losers usually carry wannabe iPhones and the cool kids carry the real thing. 
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #83 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phone-UI-Guy View Post


You don't know what you are talking about. There are some excellent margins being made in the server market. Look at Cisco's UCS. It isnt cheap and they came out of no where and disrupted the server market in a big way.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps10265/index.html

UCS, VBlock etc... are not typical servers.  They are very high end packages and super expensive, and they too are designed to run VMWare.  

 

I would not say that they came out of nowhere and disrupt the server market.

Cisco, EMC and VMWare rule the high end infrastructure world so what ever the come out with is highly regarded and when they team up to come out with something like VBlock, they know that there is a need for it and how to sell it, so they make money.  If company XYZ came out with an equivalent box, it would not be as successful.

post #84 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Great article, but I have some problems with parts of it.  
 
When Daniel describes Apple's "low end disruption" of the market, I think he's mostly dreaming or twisting things around to fit his own opinion. Apple rarely if ever engages in classic "low end" market disruption.  Specifically, when he describes Apple's inclusion of the camera in the iPhone as low end disruption of Flip's camera market he's really got it backwards.  
 
"Disruption" is a strategy and by definition, intentional.  The Flip camera was itself, a classic low end disruption of the camera market.  One simple, cheap, and easy to use device took the place of what was at the time many hundreds of dollars worth of more complicated equipment that was actually quite difficult to use.  It was a purposeful act to try and capture a huge segment of the digital video camera market and it worked.  

 

I generally agree with this post. However, with regards to this second paragraph, you overlooked the possibility of collateral disruption and that's what I believe Daniel was pointing at. While "intentionally" building a superior camera in a phone, Apple disrupted the dedicated camera market segment occupied by Flip's camera. Which may not have been an intentional target. Just as Apple may not have intended to disrupt the "point of sale" equipment market, the capability of the iPhone and iPad to function in that capacity has done so.

 

What I find so amazing to me about the Apple iDevices is how they have became the platform for creating solutions to categories that I doubt Apple set out to affect. If Apple were to create the right kind of low-cost iPhone, and they start showing up inside radio controlled model aircraft, that doesn't mean, QED, they set out to intentionally disrupt products in that market.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #85 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post


Reality check here too -- iOS has never held a market share lead in the global phone industry, especially this mythical "huge lead" that the lazy tech press keeps ascribing to Apple.  The meme of the moment is that Apple is doomed -- never mind the actual market share, unit sales, and revenue data -- the tech press can only perpetuate this story by making crap up.  The fact of the matter is that iOS has consistently held either the #2 or #3 market position for at least the past 3+ years, yet controls 2/3 of the smartphone industry profits.  Android's unit sales ascent has been at the expense of Symbian and Blackberry.  Stagnant?  Whatever.  I just want my devices to perform the functions that I use well.  I prefer quality over quantity.  Useful over novel.  I don't need a laundry list of new half-baked checkbox features that I will never use.  New or different is not the same thing as better.

Oh yeah?  Check again...

Who has the highest profit share by far in the smart phone industry?

Who has nine straight JD Powers awards for customer satisfaction?


Edited by AppleSauce007 - 4/6/13 at 9:13pm
post #86 of 150
Great post, thanks!
post #87 of 150
Wow this has been the best article Ive read in a long time and exactly what I've been telling my android friends in terms of value, perceived value, market positioning and marketing. Apple is a just amazing at how they do this stuff I mean if you are good at chess or a coach and your work is in knowing how to position your players (products) then you can understand why apple is highly admired. And yes an Apple search engine is much needed but they are going to have to catch the next wave on this one.
post #88 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

iTunes is not superior to the corresponding Amazon product, nor to Google music, and both of which offer storage of your own content a la iTunes match. With google (or dropbox, or amazon) you have complete cross-platform compatibility. (and yes, I have several generations of apple hardware of all kinds, like it, but really resent Apple's attempts at lockin).


I find iTunes to be superior to those me too, half-baked services. iTunes works as advertised. Those others make you jump through hoops to use them.

What lock in are you referring to? I can use my mp3s with any of these services.

post #89 of 150
The market dynamics of Servers is vastly different since as others have stated. It's becoming more and more 'commoditized' with OS's running in a virtualized layer. Apple's xServe brought no competitive advantages and being tied to Apple's OSX Server was a major drawback for Window-centric IT shops. Perhaps if VMWare supported it with Windows and Linux as host OS's it might have had a chance. Apple was wise to kill it (along with their RAID product) and focus on their smartphone and tablet projects. IMHO, Apple is at it's best when it IS disrupting markets and not chasing the market with low-cost knockoffs.

The iOS vs. Android competition reminds me of the MacOS vs. Windows battles of the late '80's, early '90's. Apple tried to compete, with Microsoft, by turning out 'low-end' Macs which damaged their brand and did nothing to stop the Windows juggernaut. I suspect Apple has learned a thing, or two since then, but as there is no Steve Jobs around to rescue Apple this time lets hope they get it right...
post #90 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by orthorim View Post

2 - Android's other advantages are: Distribution - here, I don't see Apple catching up in markets like SE Asia where phones are sold in the majority by little tech shops in the malls. None of those little shops carry iPhones. Most never carried iPods either. Apple doesn't seem to have a good model to deal with those mom and pop operations. The effect is that in SE Asia for every iPhone on display, there are about 100 Android phones on display. That's got to have an effect on sales. iPhone success so far has been despite distribution issues.
 

 

 

 

Even here in the US, where there's a "mobile" shop on every other corner, you don't see the iPhone either... These shops usually cater to non-contract phones.

 

But, I think when he mentioned distribution he was referring to carriers, not necessarily retail shops. The iPhone is currently offered by half the number of carriers Android devices are. And of course the biggest carrier in the world, China Mobile, has yet to offer an iPhone, although talks are supposedly underway.

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #91 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Search algorithms are important, but Google also has AdSense and, even more importantly, the best infrastructure in the world. It would take Apple a LONG time to duplicate this, and given the lousy implementation of their current cloud services, the sun might well go nova before then.

Don't bet the farm on that.

 

Apple Maps and Siri are doing great.

If William Stasior's team can develop a good search engine with integrated advertising, then Apple can remove Google as the default search engine on iOS and Mac OS X.

 

post #92 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

iTunes is not superior to the corresponding Amazon product, nor to Google music, and both of which offer storage of your own content a la iTunes match. With google (or dropbox, or amazon) you have complete cross-platform compatibility. (and yes, I have several generations of apple hardware of all kinds, like it, but really resent Apple's attempts at lockin).

 

iTunes is far superior to those other offerings. You're not looking hard enough, or you're fine with settling for what those other lack.

 

The thing most people miss with Apple's services is... Apple doesn't create and build services for the public at large, they offer these services to their customers - meaning you have to buy an Apple product to use that service. This is the same argument that people used to make about not being able to install Mac OS X on a generic PC... That argument is quickly shot down because Apple doesn't sell their operating system to the public at large, they sell their operating system to their existing customers - meaning you have to buy an Apple product. You can't compare Windows and Mac OS X just as you can't compare services like Dropbox and iCloud. Windows and Dropbox ARE the products. Mac OS X and iCloud are features of a product. Windows and Dropbox are of course going to be in as many places as possible, if not, those companies aren't making money. On the other hand... Apple makes money selling devices and if they can add unique features to those devices, then they'll have a leg up on their competition.

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #93 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Search algorithms are important, but Google also has AdSense and, even more importantly, the best infrastructure in the world. It would take Apple a LONG time to duplicate this, and given the lousy implementation of their current cloud services, the sun might well go nova before then.

 

Now, I haven't watched TV in a long time, but not too long ago people hated commercials and advertising. And yet here we are living in a world where the company with the largest share of the mobile phone OS market is in fact an advertising company. And to even further baffle my mind, here is someone excited about that! However, I guess without advertising the free-loaders wouldn't have anything to do on the Internet.

 

Gee, I sure hope Apple DOESN'T want to duplicate that!

 

So you're saying Apple's NEW service sucks, even though it is NEW, you agree it takes a long time to build up infrastructure. But you're not going to give Apple time and just assume it won't EVER get any better just because some of those services currently don't live up to YOUR expectations?

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #94 of 150

The comparison is miscalculated. You could get Windows Small Business Server OEM with Exchange and SharePoint for as low as $400.

DED has been noted before, but he seems to have forgotten about it. For SMBs Dell is less expensive than Xserve.

post #95 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

Apple has its own search engine - Spotlight. Of course, it is not a search engine for the WWW.

Apple's market disruption savvy does not come from its research teams. If you were right, their research teams would go to the marketing team and say, "We have developed xyz. Which relevant markets would be interesting targets?" Instead, it's the other way around; Apple's (rather small and focused) marketing team goes to the engineering team and says, "We want you to make xyz. What kind of cool technology can you develop to make this a unique Apple experience?"

Quote:

I loved Xserve - an exemplar of clean Apple design, but your pricing equation is off. I don't know where you were buying your Windows servers but the ones we have been getting from HP and Dell in the last 20 years have NEVER been twice as expensive as Xserve, let alone Xserve with drives replaced by more expensive ones.

We miss Xserve because it always looked so cool next to the other racks.

It's Xserve, btw, not xServe, btw (shows how much you know).
Well spotted. He also is an expert in the field of Chemistry.
post #96 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

Is this so different from Google's ecosystem?

A look at the link I provided will show you it's different.

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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post #97 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by realitycheck69 View Post


I think Apple knows they NEED the jailbreak community, just like how Microsoft and adobe need piracy--marketshare. 

Bottom line: People have different needs and one device cannot possibly solve it all.

Re: Piracy - regardless of the rest of your silliness... I will grant you kudos for recognizing and acknowledging this MAJOR differentiating point between iOS devices and Android.

Fact is: outside of the US market, and even in Europe... many people do not have credit cards. Yes, you can purchase Apple Store Gift Certificates rather than use a credit card. However.. for even simple "must have" apps these days like WhatsApp... you have to have some kind of payment possibility through the Apple Store.

On the "other side", many people elect to have their Android App purchases added to their mobile bill, or deducted from their PAYG provider. The vast majority though, especially kids, prefer to "trade and share Apps" using SD cards, much the same way they comfortably "share" their music, movies, TV-shows, etc.

I recently had the eye-opening reality and "street level experience" of setting up an iPhone for an 11-year old amidst her clique of 6 school friends. Without going through a long sequence... another of the girls "shared" a number of her apps with another girl in the clique using their beat up Android 2.3 Samsungs. I asked her to show me how she did this, and then asked them all how many of their friends in school do this. Reply: except for the German equivalent of "Mean Girls (Boys)" and their iPhones... everyone.

So just as rc69 stated above and I've also posted about a few times previously on AI, Android "world wide" marketshare numbers are very similar to the "piracy marketshare" which previously propped up Microsoft for so many years. It really does NOT need any analysis or defensive editorials at all, because it plain doesn't compute into a viable and/or comparable metric between Apple: a hardware profit company vs. Android: a software services/advertisement platform.

I've also been a proponent of coming up with a completely new category of smart phone"or ***smart environment*** (i.e ecosystem) that better reflects the actual differences between the different mobile operating systems and devices. The only problem with this is that it would skew so heavily towards Apple to be almost ungraphable. Similar to tablets and web statistics.

*** No need for the "open source" fans here to tell me that a "smart environment" is one that is free in services, apps and entertainment without constraint. The young ladies did a very good job of that. I just don't want to be their parents when the 4-figure phone bill comes because of a €5,-/SMS-to-the-Caymens Trojan App everytime their kid played a game. 1wink.gif
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post #98 of 150
Not to drastically change the subject, but as an aside to my above post.

How is it that Google can continue to offer services, and now an entire platform, that is proliferating, succeeding, and profiting by abetting and aiding in subterfuge* of DRM, DMCA, Copyright and Trademark laws? * Simply stated theft and stealing. Worse yet, most of the stuff being stolen is produced by US companies and developers.

How do developers balance this disregard by Google in protecting their hard work vs. their undying love for Google and "open source"?

How do lawmakers and the justice system make the distinction between who's-helping-who to steal, and who goes to jail for it?

1bugeye.gif Sincerely, Flummoxed and Gobsmacked in Germany. 1smoking.gif
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post #99 of 150
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Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Pho?

Are you referring to the Vietnamese soup?

Excellent stuff, now you made me hungry. Lol
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post #100 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Why not?  Apple still make money selling phones and various services.  Use some imagination.  For example, Department of Defense can customize Home to suit the needs for combats. 

Not happening
post #101 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Don't bet the farm on that.

Apple Maps and Siri are doing great.
If William Stasior's team can develop a good search engine with integrated 
advertising, then Apple can remove Google as the default search engine on iOS and Mac OS X.


Do we know whether Stasior is leading development of a full fledged search engine like Bing, or rather improvement of integration of Siri with all available knowledge databases including Google, Wolfram, Yahoo Sports, etc.?
post #102 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

JD Power awards should be taken with a grain of salt -- Apple's products are the most expensive, so it is harder to be dissatisfied. I suspect that Apple wins that comparison anyway, but the margin is not quite as big as it seems.

 

Well, Let's look at it logically.

 

1.  Apple nabs 70% of global smartphone profits with only 25% of global market share.

2.  Logically people do not pay so much profits for devices that they are not satisfied with.

3.  The numbers clearly agree with JD Power and Associates

4.  The buying frenzy every time a new iDevice is released says it all.

post #103 of 150
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post
If William Stasior's team can develop a good search engine with integrated advertising

 

Why would there be advertising? You're already buying Apple's hardware. I'd think one of the TWO WORD PHRASE, HAS TO DO WITH "BENEFIT" of an "Apple Search" is the fact that it would be everything Google Search isn't. No ads, no "personalized" results, and no theft of your personal information in retaining everything you do everywhere.

 

What IS it… It's a business term. Three syllables on the first word. Either two or four on the second.

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post #104 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post


Do we know whether Stasior is leading development of a full fledged search engine like Bing, or rather improvement of integration of Siri with all available knowledge databases including Google, Wolfram, Yahoo Sports, etc.?

 

I think Siri search is and will continue to be different and eventually better, easier, more accurate with better advertising.

I don't think Apple is looking to replicate Google, Bing or Yahoo.

Something like Google search would be one component of SIRI search.

 

Take a look at what Stasior led before SIRI:   http://www.a9.com/whatwedo/


Edited by AppleSauce007 - 4/7/13 at 7:53am
post #105 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by dzfoo View Post

Gazoobee,

I think you misunderstood Daniel's point, which is taken from the original Intercom report. As a matter of fact, the point is better explained in the report itself, so I urge you to follow the link and read it.

The essence of this particular argument is that, disruption at the low-end is not necessarily due to price--in fact, cannot be through price alone--but by offering a product to a market segment that is over-served. That is, the customers do not notice or care about the lower quality of the product, and therefore prefer it due to its lower cost, convenience, or lower barriers to adoption. When this happens, the market shifts to the new offering, at the expense of the established ones.

To illustrate, Intercom compares a high-end hotel like the Four Seasons to a roadside motel. The latter is certainly cheaper, but will never disrupt the former. That is because in order to attract the customers of the Four Seasons, the motel must adopt its model of highly trained staff, improved grounds, and upscale services; which would force it to adopt its cost structure, and by consequence, lose its price advantage. The two can certainly co-exist, but one does not affect the other.

In contrast, Apple disrupted the market of low-end cameras by offering an even lower-cost solution than the Flip. As the report says, it is important to understand that "cost" in this context represents "cost of use," which may include convenience, lower price, ease of use, and other lower barriers to usage. At once, the market dropped the Flip and adopted the iPhone as the most popular consumer camera. Again, it did not matter that it was a poorer product in quality (at least at first).

dZ.

 

Someone else said that I was wrong because the low-end disruption the article indicates was "collateral" disruption and I think that is closer to the truth.  

 

My point was that the low end disruption described was (in my words), not really a classic low end disruption and (by my implication) therefore not really low end disruption at all.  I think if one wanted to be generous and include it as such, that at the very least, it's a completely different kind of so-called "low end disruption." ("collateral" disruption)  It's different because of the lack of intent, which I would argue is necessary to the definition of such disruption and therefore my argument that it wasn't low end disruption at all. 

 

I'm just saying that "classic" low end disruption of a market involves an intent to flood the market with low end devices of a type that will undercut the price while duplicating (or replicating to a "good enough" level), the features of a competitor, and that the camera situation the author described either wasn't that at all, or that it was a misrepresentation to describe it as such.  

 

It may have had a market disrupting effect, but because of what I perceive as a lack of intentionality, I don't think it's proper to say that it was low end disruption in the sense of the other examples that set up the article.  

That characterisation was a stretch IMO.  

post #106 of 150
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post
Not to drastically change the subject, but as an aside to my above post.

How is it that Google can continue to offer services, and now an entire platform, that is proliferating, succeeding, and profiting by abetting and aiding in subterfuge* of DRM, DMCA, Copyright and Trademark laws? * Simply stated theft and stealing. Worse yet, most of the stuff being stolen is produced by US companies and developers.

How do developers balance this disregard by Google in protecting their hard work vs. their undying love for Google and "open source"?

How do lawmakers and the justice system make the distinction between who's-helping-who to steal, and who goes to jail for it?

1bugeye.gif Sincerely, Flummoxed and Gobsmacked in Germany. 1smoking.gif

 

I've never understood why sideloading is so controversial on android when it has always been not just a feature but also the standard method of program installation on operating systems like OS X and Windows. Are developers closing up shop because you can install programs on your macbook from anywhere you want? With their rapidly increasing power, smartphones and tablets these days are transitioning from "phones with some apps" to general-purpose computers. Besides the form factor, is there an essential difference between a tablet and a laptop that justifies the restrictions on software sources?

post #107 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

I think Siri search is and will continue to be different and eventually better, easier, more accurate with better advertising.
I don't think Apple is looking to replicate Google, Bing or Yahoo.
Something like Google search would be one component of SIRI search.

Take a look at what Stasior led before SIRI:   http://www.a9.com/whatwedo/

I was thinking about this as well.

A "do engine" would very much differentiate an Apple "search engine." In fact, as Google adds services they increasing become more like a "do engine" by preferring their own services over competitor services. Unfortunately, being a search engine, Google Search is often confusing.
post #108 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by realitycheck69 View Post

I just read the entire article and I have to say that it is nothing more than clickbait/fanboism/wishful thinking. 

Apple blew a huge lead in the phone industry and there's nothing to prevent the same thing happening to the tablet industry. iOS is so very very stagnant and locked down. In 2007/8 it was awesome. Now? Meh.

Actually your comment is more link air that we've come to see over the past year. It's anti Apple headlines that get more readers because Apple has already fully disrupted the smartphone market. They cannot re-disrupt the market they awoke. They can only hold their ground from competition which is what they are doing.
Looking back on 2007 and 2008 as some kind of glory years in their product line is short sighted tunnel vision. Their cameras, screens and carrier selection was weak compared to others back then. The App Store was just getting started.

You sound like most analysts and consumers. If you not get excited by headlines and lines of consumers outside the store, there's nothing for you to remember. Meanwhile technology marches on and competition pushes Apple so much further than they could've gotten without it back in '07.
post #109 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

JD Power awards should be taken with a grain of salt -- Apple's products are the most expensive, so it is harder to be dissatisfied. I suspect that Apple wins that comparison anyway, but the margin is not quite as big as it seems.

It only sounds that way because your fingers are in your ears and you're screaming "lalalalala I can't heeeear you"

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post #110 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

JD Power awards should be taken with a grain of salt -- Apple's products are the most expensive, so it is harder to be dissatisfied. I suspect that Apple wins that comparison anyway, but the margin is not quite as big as it seems.

What kind if logic is that? If I'm spending that much money (although the iDevice prices are comparable to other non-Apple devices) it better be good. No margins for error there. Cheap crap gets easily replaced if there's a problem while higher priced items don't.
post #111 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post


Not happening

It is already happening with iPads.  Many companies are using iPads to do their own businesses.  

post #112 of 150

Google is losing some edge of searches to Wikipedia.  Wikipedia is constantly expanding its contents.  More and more people will use it to find useful facts. 

post #113 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Google is losing some edge of searches to Wikipedia.  Wikipedia is constantly expanding its contents.  More and more people will use it to find useful facts. 

One of the big reasons for Google Now and recent changes to voice search. You'll often get a verbal answer now rather than a link to a written one.
Edited by Gatorguy - 4/7/13 at 10:36am
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post #114 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


One of the big reasons for Google Now and recent changes to voice search. You'll often get a verbal answer now rather than a link to a written one.

Google Now is different from Wikipedia.  Google Now only gets information related to me.  Wikipedia collects facts that are universal.  

post #115 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Google Now is different from Wikipedia.  Google Now only gets information related to me.  Wikipedia collects facts that are universal.  

,,,, and recent changes to voice searches.

if I ask how old Jimmy Carter is I'm verbally given the answer instead of just offered a list of written links. Other questions like "what time is sunset today", "what is Arrmageddon", "what is a compound bow" and "When was the iPhone first released" are other questions that all got verbal answers instead of just links to the answer.
Edited by Gatorguy - 4/7/13 at 12:44pm
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post #116 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Search algorithms are important, but Google also has AdSense and, even more importantly, the best infrastructure in the world. It would take Apple a LONG time to duplicate this, and given the lousy implementation of their current cloud services, the sun might well go nova before then.

Google is good, I will give them that. They are also very de-focused with Android and all the hardware investments that goes with that. By not sticking to their knitting, they could lose out in the search arena. It could happen. I remember when Motorola Mobil reigned supreme, now they are a money-losing brand circling the drain...

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #117 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Is this so different from Google's ecosystem?

Apple's ecosystem is solid and highly used.

 

Google's ecosystem comes and goes in strange patterns and is by tire kickers looking for a free app.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #118 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


,,,, and recent changes to voice searches.

if I ask how old Jimmy Carter is I'm verbally given the answer instead of just offered a list of written links. Other questions like "what time is sunset today", "what is Arrmageddon", "what is a compound bow" and "When was the iPhone first released" are other questions that all got verbal answers instead of just links to the answer.

Will it verbally tell me what is a nuclear power plant? 

post #119 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by realitycheck69 View Post

I just read the entire article and I have to say that it is nothing more than clickbait/fanboism/wishful thinking. 

Apple blew a huge lead in the phone industry and there's nothing to prevent the same thing happening to the tablet industry. iOS is so very very stagnant and locked down. In 2007/8 it was awesome. Now? Meh.

Reality check: Apple never had a huge lead in the handset or smartphone sector.
post #120 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

How? Which of the services on your link does google NOT provide?

You really know so little about Apple and Google's cloud services that you can't see any variances between the two?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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