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Former Apple consultant: Apple's iPhone naming conventions send 'weak message' - Page 4

post #121 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post

What is strange about the naming convention is not the S, it is having any number at all.

iMacs are iMacs, you don't have an iMac 9s.

If Apple was to truly follow its simplicity, then there would just be an iPhone and there would be three models of it, good, better, best.

Since this guy worked on the iMac branding it is a complete mystery why he didn't say this.

If you think about it... that's exactly what they do. There are always 3 iPhones on the market at any one time... good, better, best.

Right now it's the iPhone 4, iPhone 4S and iPhone 5. It just so happens that they are the 2010, 2011 and 2012 models. This year's "better" iPhone was last year's "best" iPhone. Apple didn't have to create another model to fill that midrange spot... they just kept iPhone 4S in production. It's a good way to down on costs.
post #122 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post

What is strange about the naming convention is not the S, it is having any number at all.

iMacs are iMacs, you don't have an iMac 9s.

If Apple was to truly follow its simplicity, then there would just be an iPhone and there would be three models of it, good, better, best.

Since this guy worked on the iMac branding it is a complete mystery why he didn't say this.

 

An interesting notion but there would still have to be some way of differentiating one model from another. I doubt people would want to go around saying 'I've got the iPhone with 4 inch screen A6 chip'

 

The iMac has a much longer period between redesigns and they don't sell old and new models at the same time. Even though they don't give them official labels they get them anyway... G5, Intel Polycarb, Aluminium Unibody etc (might have been easier if they HAD given them numbers!)

post #123 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Oh good god, you're not still going on about that are you! [sic] It makes perfect sense to pretty much everyone other than you.

Blame the article for bringing it up. Apple messed up bad with iPhone naming, as I'll point out below. Match the colors and bold, italicized (and both) wording for their corresponding information.  

 

Let's take a quick look, by generation and name:

 

1st) iPhone - original

 

2nd) iPhone 3G - second iPhone - named for 3G network capability (2nd iteration by design)

 

3rd) iPhone 3GS - [S]peedier version of the 3G

 

4th) iPhone 4 - 4th Generation (3rd iteration by design) The ONLY iPhone named for its generation.

 

5th) iPhone 4S - [S]peedier version of the iPhone 4. Incorrect leaks from Asia kept calling this release the "iPhone 5" - the media got this ball rolling, and caused all kinds of hell when it turned out to be the "4S" model.

 

6th) iPhone 5 - (4th iteration by design) makes zero sense as the 6th generation iPhone, especially when you consider there was NEVER an iPhone 2 or 3 BY NAME. Argue all you want, but that's a fact. See above. In fact, it isn't even the 5th design iteration (it's the 4th). There's absolutely no reason for a 5 to be in the name, other than to feed the illiterate media and their following of zombies who can't use simple logic.

 

Apple clearly didn't think this naming thing through when they named the 2nd Generation iPhone (iPhone 3G). The ONLY iPhone named for its generation was the 4

 

To say "it makes perfect sense to pretty much everyone other than you" only shows you're one of the media zombies. You listen to the media instead of using simple logic. Apple named it "iPhone 5" because of the media. Since there were so many disappointed people when Apple released the 4S instead of the 5 (based on incorrect leaks from Asia, noted above), they had to "give them what they wanted." Again, how does this make sense?

 

Apple had a chance to set this whole naming thing to rest with the 6th generation iPhone (AKA iPhone 5), as they did with the 3rd generation iPad, but they felt the need to feed the media engine. They could've quite simply just named it iPhone - 6th generation (following iPod/iPad naming), or iPhone - fall 2012 (following Mac naming). If you say that naming could confuse people if they continue selling a previous generation, well, look at what they did with the iPod Touch. They're selling generations 4 and 5 side-by-side. Everyone knows the 5th generation is the newest and most expensive. They have the option to save some money by buying one a generation (or two - in the case of the iPhones) older. 

 

As much as I hate Samesung, at least they're doing the name thing correctly with the Galaxy S line. The S4 isn't much more than a revamp of the S3, but they're being consistent with the naming. 

post #124 of 199
It's true that the naming convention doesn't make sense when you consider the iterative history, but only pedants and nerds give a carp. The public doesn't care to any appreciable degree. The #, #S, # system is now established and the history is in the past. Lets move on now.

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post #125 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax 
The article is right. The S thing is not awesome. Every time an "S" version comes out there are stories on the evening news about "the 'real' version X+1 will be coming out later." That affects some people's buying decisions. Just like more people would by "New Software 5!" than "New Software 4.1!"

When I see an 'S' device, I think of it as a refresh model like I would a Playstation Slim.

It might be down to marketing but probably not just Apple's. With the Galaxy S4 looking very much like the S3, it's disappointing and doesn't seem to warrant the S4 name yet it's not the same with laptops/desktops or even iPads. I think that pocket-sized mobile items are perceived more like jewellery. Fashion items tend to change year after year with very little reason just because people like the change.

Few would be disappointed this year with the Retina MBP just because it has the same design as last year's model. I reckon there will be the same disappointment expressed at a 5S as happens with every 'S' model but it will still sell really well. The 'S' on this one can be for security with the fingerprint sensor, speed with the graphics and style if there's a new UI design.

I think overall, their naming convention works well. If they only sold one model per year, they could just use iPhone on it's own but that's not the case. It would be clear enough to use a year after it but if your entry level phone has a 2 year old date on it, that's going to drive people to competing phones.

It'll be interesting to see the design they come up with for the 2014 iPhone. I got the impression they were evolving to a static unibody design like the Macs and that's where we are now.

Samsung has a 'mini' version of their Galaxy line as does Sony with the Xperia. There's no way Apple could really have an iPhone mini and iPhone like the iPad as it mandates that the mini one be smaller. If they had something like iPhone Basic, iPhone Regular, iPhone Premium, they'd have to keep renaming them every year and it would make resale quite difficult. They'll have to come up with a new convention eventually but I think the convention they've used until now has been fine.
post #126 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

no it makes zero sense. Do you ever hear short people say "I'm only 5 feet short?" Or if you're measuring something do you say it's x inches narrow? Or a pool is 12 feet shallow? Of course not.

I've heard people say "I'm 64 years young" - which amounts to the same thing.

It's a stupid affectation, but you can't stop people from butchering the language.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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post #127 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

 

For goodness' sake, start thinking about this like a typical consumer rather than somebody who posts on an Apple enthusiast forum.

 

It wouldn't be mocked whether it was Apple or not, because 99% of the population doesn't know and doesn't care exactly how many phone models Apple or any other manufacturer has produced.

 

What would seem absurd to the general population is calling a product 'iPhone 6' when the last product was the 4S. People may have short memories, but they do know how to count to 6 without missing numbers out.

 

I don't believe that you can't perceive how the typical consumer would see a change from 4 to 6. Step out of the bubble.

Did it confuse people when Apple named the 2nd Generation iPhone the "3G"? Where was the iPhone 2? Ah ha! There wasn't even an iPhone "3"...


Edited by RedGeminiPA - 4/7/13 at 5:56am
post #128 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


 The iPad has been sold the same way since the original save for the iPad 3 which was immediately removed when the iPad 4 was introduced. 

INCORRECT. The original iPad was immediately discontinued when the iPad 2 was released. The iPad 2 is still in production as the lower-cost full-size iPad option, which will probably be fazed out when the 5th Generation iPad comes, since the iPad mini is now the lowest cost iPad on the market. Apple may keep the 4th Generation to fill that void, but I have my doubts. 


Edited by RedGeminiPA - 4/7/13 at 5:57am
post #129 of 199
Weak Message?
Quite the oposite? I think Apple current iPhone naming scheme actually sends an extremely honest and easy to understand message.

What does the names Lumia 800 and Lumia 920 tell you about these products?


iPhone 4 - the 4th phone Apple made
iPhone 4S - a better iPhone 4 that also has Siri


On the iPad 3...

Apple called iPad 3 the New iPad because it was not a better iPad 2 but rather an re-imagined iPad 1. the New iPad was in some respects a step back from the iPad 2 but an improvement over the iPad 1 in every way, especially the screen.
post #130 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I've heard people say "I'm 64 years young" - which amounts to the same thing.

It's a stupid affectation, but you can't stop people from butchering the language.
True, dat. And I hate it.

Guess I need to remind myself that Apple did come up with Think Different. Hmm....wonder if Ken Segall was involved in that?
post #131 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post

Did it confuse people when Apple named the 2nd Generation iPhone the "3G"? Where was the iPhone 2? Ah ha! There wasn't even an iPhone "3"...
Is anyone confused by iPhone 5? No. So why does it matter whether they called it 5 or 6? Consumers don't care. And by now they know the 'S' version of the phone will retain the same case design as the previous model. Because it doesn't make sense for Apple to re-tool their manufacturing processes every year just because some tech junkies need their itch scratched with a new case design.
post #132 of 199
Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post
Since this guy worked on the iMac branding it is a complete mystery why he didn't say this.

 

He doesn't care about being right. He only cares about Apple being wrong. Because that's what sells right now.

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #133 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


Is anyone confused by iPhone 5? No. So why does it matter whether they called it 5 or 6? Consumers don't care. And by now they know the 'S' version of the phone will retain the same case design as the previous model. 

 

True, everyone knows that the "S" model will look the same, be faster, and include at least one feature that will compel many non-S owners to upgrade.

 

  • 3G -> 3GS  = S model adds multitasking, voice control, videocam, compass
  • 4 -> 4S = S model adds Siri
  • 5 -> 5S = S model adds (widgets??  NFC??)
post #134 of 199
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post
  • 5 -> 5S = S model adds (widgets??  NFC??)

 

Yep, let's name the two most worthless possible additions in a subtle attempt at preemptively saying "that's it?" to Apple. 1oyvey.gif

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #135 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Yep, let's name the two most worthless possible additions in a subtle attempt at preemptively saying "that's it?" to Apple. 1oyvey.gif

 

On the contrary, I named the first two things that came to mind, that I have found to be useful, and would want.

 

Feel free to add your own wishlist instead.

post #136 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

It's true that the naming convention doesn't make sense when you consider the iterative history, but only pedants and nerds give a carp. The public doesn't care to any appreciable degree. The #, #S, # system is now established and the history is in the past. Lets move on now.

Here's the problem:

 

What happened to the iPhone 1S, 2, 2S, 3, 3S? There was never a 2 or 3, and definitely not an "S" variant of either or the 1st iPhone. 

 

I constantly hear people mention an iPhone "3". When I ask if they're referring to a 3G or 3GS, most of them have no idea. Talk about confusion for the simple minded. I haven't encountered that issue so much when trying to distinguish between the 4 and 4S, though it still happens. I usually just ask if it has Siri, then that usually helps them figure it out if I can't physically inspect the phone. 

 

Apple should've just used simple numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6... and so on, or just simply by generation. They got off on the wrong foot when they called the 2nd iPhone the "3G" as part of its name. Most people I've talked to know the generation of the iPod they own(ed)... iPhone naming of the same nature would come easy. Just look at the iPads now. Common names follow the generation: iPad 3, iPad 4... It takes the confusion out of it. When the 2nd generation iPad mini comes out, it will most likely be referred to by the generation, or "with Retina Display (if so equipped)" to help distinguish them. Most people will refer to them by the generation, unless Apple starts throwing in useless suffixes that will eventually confuse people.

 

It isn't that Apple's iPhone naming sends a "weak message," it's that it eventually confuses consumers who aren't tech savvy.  

 

For those of you talking about the simple minded, non-geek, non-techie "average" consumers, this is something to think about. 

post #137 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

On the contrary, I named the first two things that came to mind, that I have found to be useful, and would want.

 

Feel free to add your own wishlist instead.

I guess you want animated wallpapers like Android has... that every Android users I know complains about it sucking the battery life out of their phone, or slows it down. 

 

NFC, maybe. I'm sure there could be some useful features built upon it. Widgets? Not unless Apple can come up with something better that won't eat up the processes or decrease battery life, another complaint of my Android-toting friends. 

 

Android has a ton of features that people don't know how to use, or they complain about one problem or another because of using said features. I don't want or need that with my Apple devices. 

post #138 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I don't give a flying frick how successful the device is. That doesn't matter. People clearly don't have a clue why the name is a problem.

 

I think the case can be made that if the device is successful, then the name is NOT a problem, although one can also make the case that if a name is confusing enough so that the user isn't sure what they're getting, then that can defer a purchase decision.   However, I don't think that's the case with the iPhone.   

 

Furthermore, let's assume the consultant is correct - that the "S" sends a weak message.    Let's say instead that the next iPhone is called the iPhone 6 (or I guess as you desire, the iPhone 7).   But let's say it's only a minor upgrade from the iPhone 5.   Which sends the weaker message:   giving a phone a totally new name when it barely has anything new in it or being honest and saying up front that it's an incremental upgrade by giving it the "s" designation?     I think the former sends the weaker message.    Otherwise, you'll hear, "Apple came out with totally new iPhone model today that has little new in it except for the name" even though other companies do this all the time.

 

As far as your complaint is concerned, no one cares how many models have come before.   They only care about whether they're buying the latest model.   So claiming that there's a big problem because the iPhone 5 is actually the sixth model is creating an issue that's not really there, IMO and seems to me to be more of an anal-retentive complaint.   

 

For me, it's not the iPhones that have a naming problem, it's everything else.    What do you call the iPad that comes after "the new iPad", the "even newer iPad"?     How do I know whether I'm buying a previous model or a new model of the MacBook Pro unless I'm sophisticated enough to check if it has a retina screen and/or the thickness of the body?     Internally, Apple gives them dates: "late 2011", etc.  When you have a service issue and look up a model on the Apple website, that's the nomenclature that's given.   Maybe those kinds of designations should be used in the model names as well, which actually may help increase upgrade sales.  My MacBook Pro works fine and I don't feel like it's an "old" model until I realize just how old it actually is.   If every time I used it, instead of seeing "MacBook Pro" at the bottom of the display, I saw "MacBook Pro 2008", I might think, "geez this is old - time for a new computer".   

 

Having said that, I would not want Apple to start doing what the car companies do:   start calling anything that comes after June 2013 a 2014 model.   It used to be September before models would have the following year's designation.   It seems like every year it drops back a month.  And most years, they don't do much more than perhaps change the paint color options and maybe slightly change the shape of the fender or the door handles, yet they still call it a new model.   

post #139 of 199

Kind of hilarious their naming conventions generate 4 pages of comments.  Maybe they need to do a focus group on what sounds to the coolest.  Much like many sports teams tried to incorporate darker colors into their logo because they found they sold better (granted that is a product that sells on looks and function versus primarily function) maybe there is a better name to use.  Ignoring the quality of the product I actually think the S version sounds better.  I doubt it would make much of an impact on sales, but when you are dealing with numbers over 100 million over the course of a year even a tiny percentage is worth exploring.

post #140 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post

INCORRECT. The original iPad was immediately discontinued when the iPad 2 was released. The iPad 2 is still in production as the lower-cost full-size iPad option, which will probably be fazed out when the 5th Generation iPad comes, since the iPad mini is now the lowest cost iPad on the market. Apple may keep the 4th Generation to fill that void, but I have my doubts. 

Mea culpa. I realized whilst I was halfway to sleep that it wasn't until the 2nd gen iPad that Apple started keeping an older model.


Note: Starting off with the word incorrect (or wrong) in all caps doesn't help make your post more readable or more correct.

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post #141 of 199
This guy is definitely wrong...
Take Porsche, they make 911 Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S, everyone knows the S stands for aweSome.
post #142 of 199
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

But let's say it's only a minor upgrade from the iPhone 5.

 

Hmm… a LOT of taffy hypotheticals here. lol.gif


Otherwise, you'll hear, "Apple came out with totally new iPhone model today that has little new in it except for the name" 

 

You hear that now. Of every single model. The trick is to punch the idiots in the face, not give them chocolates.


As far as your complaint is concerned, no one cares how many models have come before.   They only care about whether they're buying the latest model.


That's why absolutely no one whatsoever has any trouble with knowing the generation (hey look, they want to know how many came before) of the iPod they're buying. 

Ask anyone with an iPod (any kind). They know what generation it is.


For me, it's not the iPhones that have a naming problem, it's everything else.    What do you call the iPad that comes after "the new iPad", the "even newer iPad"?

 

"The new iPad." And the subsequent one? "The new iPad." And the subsequent one? "The new iPad." And the subsequent one? "The new iPad."

 

I don't really see how that's difficult. But there's also no need for it when you can just call the device "iPad" in marketing, regardless of the iteration.


How do I know whether I'm buying a previous model or a new model of the MacBook Pro unless I'm sophisticated enough to check if it has a retina screen and/or the thickness of the body?

 

Again, if you're not doing this by default, you deserve whatever you buy. The claim that "people do absolutely no research whatsoever before purchasing a product and simply look at its name" is absolutely ludicrous. And yet a lot of people in this thread want to perpetuate it.


Internally, Apple gives them dates: "late 2011", etc. Maybe those kinds of designations should be used in the model names as well

 

Why, when it's blindingly obvious that's completely unnecessary? 

CALL THE PRODUCT "iPhone". CALL THE PRODUCT "iPad". It has worked for a DECADE for the entire iPod family. It has worked for FIFTEEN YEARS for the iMac, and for as long as their existence with every other respective Mac model. 


My MacBook Pro works fine and I don't feel like it's an "old" model until I realize just how old it actually is.   If every time I used it, instead of seeing "MacBook Pro" at the bottom of the display, I saw "MacBook Pro 2008", I might think, "geez this is old - time for a new computer". Having said that, I would not want Apple to start doing what the car companies do:   start calling anything that comes after June 2013 a 2014 model.   It used to be September before models would have the following year's designation.   It seems like every year it drops back a month.  And most years, they don't do much more than perhaps change the paint color options and maybe slightly change the shape of the fender or the door handles, yet they still call it a new model.   

 

You're right on the nose with all of this, though. Spot on.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #143 of 199
Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Brother 84 View Post
 

...

 

For 99.9% of potential customers the nuances of a name won't affect their buying decision. But even 0.1% of a market this size is worth having.

 

...

 

Ding, ding, ding! We have a winner.  This is exactly right.

 

A brand consultant's job is to do the best he or she can do with that 0.1% (for many classes of product it's a much, much higher figure).  Is the iPhone naming convention the best possible system that anyone could dream up?  Almost certainly not.  Whew, glad we settled that.

post #144 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Why, when it's blindingly obvious that's completely unnecessary? 

CALL THE PRODUCT "iPhone". CALL THE PRODUCT "iPad". It has worked for a DECADE for the entire iPod family. It has worked for FIFTEEN YEARS for the iMac, and for as long as their existence with every other respective Mac model.

If you are going to argue this point you need successfully argue why it's not an issue when, unlike the Mac lines, Apple offers old iDevice models alongside the better iDevice models as cheaper models that are still being produced as new.


Hint: http://www.apple.com/ipod/compare-ipod-models/

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post #145 of 199
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
If you are going to argue this point you need successfully argue why it's not an issue when, unlike the Mac lines, Apple offers old iDevice models alongside the better iDevice models as cheaper models that are still being produced as new.

 

I should think that resolves itself. The iPod touch has been doing it numberless since the first time that happened. No one complained. The iPad does it with a HIGHER number being WORSE and has done so for almost two years. No one complained.

 

Is there something I'm missing? I realize that I often achieve final solutions where others fail to find the first step on the way to that solution, so if I'm considering too much information to be "common knowledge", let me know.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #146 of 199

Poor TS. He's been clean now for almost 6 months, then along comes an article like this and it knocks him right off the wagon.

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post #147 of 199

Logic says this consultant is not completely off base. Those who follow the iPhone releases regularly may rationally prefer the numbering to match the year since 2007. But sales figures suggest neither logic nor rationalization stopped Apple to grow its iPhone base. Sure, we will never know how many more Apple could have sold if they were more purist in numbering the iPhone. But does it matter.

 

It's presumptuous to believe Apple chose the numbering scheme haphazardly. It's also silly to write off this consultant who is a professional in this field, and there is logic in what he had to say.

 

For sure, there is no reason to be so disdainful of rationalization one way or the other. 

post #148 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post


Quick question. Did you type this on your iMac 7?

 

I typed it on my Core i7 3770-based computer which is somehow different from first Core i7 from three product cycles ago.

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post #149 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I should think that resolves itself. The iPod touch has been doing it numberless since the first time that happened. No one complained. The iPad does it with a HIGHER number being WORSE and has done so for almost two years. No one complained.

Is there something I'm missing? I realize that I often achieve final solutions where others fail to find the first step on the way to that solution, so if I'm considering too much information to be "common knowledge", let me know.

I see what you're getting at and as I've previously stated I personally don't think it would be an issue to follow the iPod Touch's marketing designation but there are some clear differences between the iPhone and iPad which are the two most popular product categories from Apple and the iPod Touch which is in a product category that is becoming less important to Apple.

On top of that, the iPod Touch 4th generation and iPod Touch 5th generation look very different as one is considerably smaller than the other, and whilst both have a Retina display the older model has a TN panel, worse color, lower backlight, no in-cell touch panel, and thicker GG which makes the display look worse compared to the newer one even if the customer doesn't understand why.

I mention these disparities because if the next generation iPod Touch is dropped and the only visual differences are subtle (e.g.: same display tech, size, and case design) will they still go with iPod Touch 5th generation as the older and iPod Touch 6th generation?

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post #150 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukefrench View Post

So Apple simply dont lie to its customers (at least on that important point), which is perhapa why satisfaction rates are tru the roof.

You make an important point here that hasn't been addressed. If e iPhone 3GS and the iPhone 4S had been the next number of e series, it could be perceived as misleading to the customer, since they 3GS and 4S share the same body and chassis to their predecessors.
post #151 of 199
Out of left field, the next iPhone will be called the iPhone XP. Who the hell cares.
post #152 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post

I guess you want animated wallpapers like Android has... that every Android users I know complains about it sucking the battery life out of their phone, or slows it down. 

 

I didn't say I wanted animated wallpapers.

 

However, since you bring them up, correctly written ones should only use from a few seconds to a few minutes of CPU time a day.

 

That's because most shouldn't be active unless you're looking at a homescreen, which is not something most people do for very long unless they're bored or playing with the wallpaper itself.  If someone notices that a certain wallpaper is using up battery for no reason, they should dump it, or stop playing with it all day :)

 

Quote:
NFC, maybe. I'm sure there could be some useful features built upon it.

 

Agreed.

 

Quote:
Widgets? Not unless Apple can come up with something better that won't eat up the processes or decrease battery life, another complaint of my Android-toting friends. 

 

Again, it all depends on what the widget does.

 

If it's just a static settings widget (Bluetooth, WiFi, screen brightness, etc) then of course it takes up no extra CPU time unless touched.

 

If it's a once a day update widget (Moon Phase is one I use), then again, almost no CPU time is taken up.

 

The only widgets that would use up noticeable battery would be ones that have to be active quite often.  Say, a widget that constantly shows amount of data being used, or nearby WiFi hotspots, or your location on a map, or perhaps a weather radar widget.

 

Fortunately, the user can pick and choose which ones are worthwhile to them, so it's a win-win situation.  Don't like them?  Don't use them.  Do like them?  They're available.

 

Really, it's all no different than the way some iOS apps constantly ping the GPS in the background and use up battery.  If that happens, and you don't want it, don't use that app.  Easy peasy.

post #153 of 199

This article would make perfect sense if made in a vacuum, yet there is a method to the numbering madness.

 

It just happens that Apple gets a hearty subsidy from the carriers, who in turn make it up by keeping most of their subscribers tied to 2-year contracts on the same phone.

 

As it is now, a lot of them subscribers bitch and moan for the latest and greatest every year, creating pressure on the carriers to concede and lose some potential profit in the process, then in turn bringing pressure to Apple regarding the amount of those subsidies.

 

The current naming simply keeps users on 24-month contracts from feeling as if they "skipped" a model number, and more willing to wait out their contracts.

 

Platform loyalty (as in brand name, quality, ecosystem and content) takes care of the competition.

post #154 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz1492 View Post

The current naming simply keeps users on 24-month contracts from feeling as if they "skipped" a model number, and more willing to wait out their contracts.

That sounds like a plausible argument.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #155 of 199

A lot of long threads on fairly 'blah' topics on AI, lately.

 

God, I am ready for something new from Apple. Even rumors of something new (other than a cheap iPhone). 1hmm.gif

post #156 of 199
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
Poor TS. He's been clean now for almost 6 months, then along comes an article like this and it knocks him right off the wagon.

 

Come the heck right off it. You've never had a valid argument in this regard.


Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
…will they still go with iPod Touch 5th generation as the older and iPod Touch 6th generation?

 

I should think they'd be fools not to. Visual differentiation isn't that important, given the 2, 3, and 4 looked the same and they still underwent this same sales pitch.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #157 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Come the heck right off it. You've never had a valid argument in this regard.

I should think they'd be fools not to. Visual differentiation isn't that important, given the 2, 3, and 4 looked the same and they still underwent this same sales pitch.

But did they sell the 2nd and 3rd or 3rd and 4th generation iPod Touches alongside each other, or did they discontinue them the day the others went on sale? I seem to recall it was the latter.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #158 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post

I constantly hear people mention an iPhone "3". 

 

Really?  I mean, really?  I've never heard a single person refer to an iPhone 3, in person or in print.  I don't think this problem exists.

 

And even if it does, it's a historical problem.  Apple can't rename products they shipped 4 years ago, it's done and dusted.  So let's just move on, Apple have found a new naming scheme, and they look like they'll stick with it.  If they don't, well I'm sure we'll deal with that too, as long as it isn't daft.

 

This isn't a problem, and people need to move on.

censored

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post #159 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Really?  I mean, really?  I've never heard a single person refer to an iPhone 3, in person or in print.  I don't think this problem exists.

And even if it does, it's a historical problem.  Apple can't rename products they shipped 4 years ago, it's done and dusted.  So let's just move on, Apple have found a new naming scheme, and they look like they'll stick with it.  If they don't, well I'm sure we'll deal with that too, as long as it isn't daft.

This isn't a problem, and people need to move on.

Sure they did, just as people refer to various versions as iPhone 4G. It's either shorthand or just not knowing the proper nomenclature. You also hear people refer to the iPod Touch as an iTouch and refer to non-Apple products as iPods, iPhones and iPads.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #160 of 199
It sounds clever.
I am quite savy on buying new devices, and that is exactly how I feel when I pay attention to the little S. It's like a little voice in my head whispering "Wait for the next year".
I didn't feel the same way when the 3rd-gen iPad was released, even though the processor couldn't handle the display - and eventually made the whole tablet slower than its predecessor in some areas. You see? Marketing. And you can always improve it.

Yeah, each iPhone outsells the previous one by a large number of reasons, but he has a point.
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  • Former Apple consultant: Apple's iPhone naming conventions send 'weak message'
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