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Former Apple consultant: Apple's iPhone naming conventions send 'weak message' - Page 2

post #41 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The only weak message is calling your 6th device "5". That's just pre-kindergarten levels of stupidity.

I'm perfectly fine with the "S" monicker otherwise. 

And if he weren't a complete idiot, he'd realize that the "S" models are no more "identical to last year's but better" than any other product from any other company.

This is a forum troll being paid to troll and disguising it as a job. "It looks the same; it must be the same phone" is crap we delete these days.
So what have you done with your life to date worth talking about? Ken has had a remarkable career in marketing and is worth listening to even if you disagree.
post #42 of 199
Originally Posted by zoffdino View Post
On the iPad topic, dropping the version number was about the most confusing thing Apple ever did.

 

Least confusing, and they SHOULD have done it on the iPhone, too. Is your complaint that because they still sell the iPad 2 the 'iPad' is somehow "less" than 'iPad 2'?


Instead of calling it a simple "iPad 4" they call it "iPad, fourth generation".

 

Just like every single computer Apple has ever made. What's the big deal?


  Marketing name Generation name Common name
iPad iPad first-gen iPad iPad
iPad 2 iPad 2 second-gen iPad iPad 2
iPad 3 the new iPad third-gen iPad iPad 3
iPad 4 iPad with retina display fourth-gen iPad iPad 4

 

They dropped the number from the name, but it doesn't even have to be in the name. At this point they should just drop "the new", "with", and anything else from the marketing and just market the darn thing as "iPad". People will get it. They do for computers; what's so hard about the same for these? 

 

People explicitly talk about their iPods by generation name. Regular people, not techies. Because they actually care enough about the product to do research about it. Have you seen any problem with that in the last decade? I think "iPod 10", "iPod nano 5", or "iPod shuffle 3" would have been far stupider than what Apple actually did, don't you? The "complaint" with names like this takes into consideration only brain-dead morons with more money than sense, buying a product on name alone "because it sounds better/higher/etc." I don't think any company wants to cater to that crowd. 

 

The same could have easily been done for the iPhone, even though they sell three years' worth at once.

 

"I want an iPhone."
"How fast do you want it to be?"

 

The distinction then becomes one of power, not of age. And as the iPad has shown, even the "transition period" won't cause problems, since Apple can successfully sell a "higher number", older product at the same time as a numberless new one.


If only Apple had sticked the same simple principle for the GUI.

 

Huh?


Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post
So what have you done with your life to date worth talking about?
 

Please insert two credits and try again. "You're not a chef, so you can't critique cooking" isn't a rebuttal.


Originally Posted by jhende7 View Post
Barely any of the "mainstream" iPhone customers have a clue how many iPhones Apple has made.

 

I disagree with that, simply because most of the "mainstream" (whatever that means) customers of the iPod family know exactly what generation their device is. If you saw Apple call the next iPod nano "iPod nano 7", even though it's the 8th generation, all hell would break loose in the support realm. And some here would still claim that I'm "embarrassing myself" by contesting such a name choice.


The mainstream customer doesn't care how many actual iPhone models have been made, and they have a very short-term memory.

 

That sounds like good evidence in the case for dropping numbers altogether. If they couldn't care less about how many there have been, why should they care about numbers in the name at all? Ah…


…I would say that perhaps it is the opposite. Perhaps the 'S' signifies to consumers that this isn't Apples beta version they're testing on you, but instead a tried and true iteration on the last product with beefed up speed...food for thought anyway.

 

I like this take, though you don't see many Apple analyst optimists. lol.gif


Edited by Tallest Skil - 4/6/13 at 2:36pm

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #43 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No one on Earth would tell you that it makes sense to call the 6th model of a product running the 6th version of its software on the 6th iteration of its processor "5".

Were it an Apple competitor, it would be still be mocked "six months out".

Yes, it's quite embarrassing for me that everyone else seems to want to perpetuate stupidity. Maybe I should say, "2+2=5". That probably makes more sense, given the sheer lack of questioning the name.

I don't give a flying frick how successful the device is. That doesn't matter. People clearly don't have a clue why the name is a problem.


I don't understand… It's right there. And you're wrong.
That wasn't a "second version". It was the same processor with a better GPU. The same is true of the A6X.

You're held up on the name indicating which generation it is, as if the iPhone 5 meant "the 5th iPhone", which it doesn't, any more than the iPhone 3G meant "the 3rd iPhone" or "iPhone, 3rd Gen".

You think people would be more confused if Apple went from the 4S to the 6?

The number indicates the model, not the generation.

Personally, I'd wish the Apple would drop the numbering sequence and just call it the "iPhone (sixth generation)" or "iPhone (mid 2013") like they do for ALL THEIR OTHER PRODUCTS, so we don't end up someday with the iPhone 12S. Yikes.

Of course, their hands are slightly tied because they continue selling at least on older generation along side the current generation.

Maybe they should adopt a name sequence, a la OS X, like "iPhone Apollo (6th Generation)", but some other less dumb naming convention. Canines? Fowl? Reptiles?
post #44 of 199

It's actually rather honest marketing. iPhone 4S was just a spec bump and the same will likely be true for 5S.

 

I'd rather have clear simple names like these than the ridiculous "One X", "Hero", "Legendary" or "no sorry this is the latest model but its model number is less than the one last year" that other manufacturers do.

post #45 of 199
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post
You're held up on the name indicating which generation it is, as if the iPhone 5 meant "the 5th iPhone", which it doesn't, any more than the iPhone 3G meant "the 3rd iPhone" or "iPhone, 3rd Gen".

 

You've explicitly ignored the two models for which that was explicitly the case.


You think people would be more confused if Apple went from the 4S to the 6?


Nope. *shrug* In fact, I was all for that until the launch of the 3rd-gen iPad, after which I was for dropping numbers entirely.


The number indicates the model, not the generation.

 

Eh? They don't create multiple models of iPhone simultaneously, therefore model = generation. The 6th model of iPhone was the 6th generation iPhone.


Personally, I'd wish the Apple would drop the numbering sequence and just call it the "iPhone (sixth generation)" or "iPhone (mid 2013") like they do for ALL THEIR OTHER PRODUCTS, so we don't end up someday with the iPhone 12S. Yikes.

 

Exactly! They'll HAVE to do it at some point; why they didn't at the most logical time (the last one) is confusing. It's just going to get uglier from here on out.


Of course, their hands are slightly tied because they continue selling at least on older generation along side the current generation.

 

Ah, read my post above. That's moot! They don't have to worry about it.

 

The old "It won't work for the iPhone!" argument loses all of its… everything… when you mention that they've been doing it just fine with the iPod touch since the 3rd generation of that device. No one whines about that. They like to forget the iPod touch exists during that time. lol.gif


Maybe they should adopt a name sequence, a la OS X, like "iPhone Apollo (6th Generation)", but some other less dumb naming convention. Canines? Fowl? Reptiles?

 

Marketing name: iPhone.

Internal name: iPhone (2015).

 

Just like every other hardware product they sell.


Originally Posted by kasakka View Post
iPhone 4S was just a spec bump and the same will likely be true for 5S.

 

Now we're getting into questioning the definition of "just". lol.gif1wink.gif

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #46 of 199

Quote:
Originally Posted by kasakka View Post

It's actually rather honest marketing. iPhone 4S was just a spec bump and the same will likely be true for 5S.

 

I'd rather have clear simple names like these than the ridiculous "One X", "Hero", "Legendary" or "no sorry this is the latest model but its model number is less than the one last year" that other manufacturers do.

 

For sure. Having numbered iPhones makes sense, but they'll have to drop the numbers eventually, when they decide it looks silly. I'm sure they'll go with another convention for their smartwatch.

post #47 of 199

The new iPhone.

 

There.

Is that a strong enough message?

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post #48 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


OK, Mr. Segall: how many products have you developed and produced that sold >100,000,000 units?


Zing! Good one. So you're saying his comments are unqualified because he cannot walk the talk?

 

I guess you will not post anymore? By your own criterion, you are not qualified to criticized Samsung, Facebook, Google or any company. You are not qualified to make comments on software, hardware.

 

Unless the topic here is pimple-popping, so long!

post #49 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The only weak message is calling your 6th device "5". That's just pre-kindergarten levels of stupidity.

I'm perfectly fine with the "S" monicker otherwise. 
Quote:
"you're looking for a 2013 model ? not a 2012S."

And if he weren't a complete idiot, he'd realize that the "S" models are no more "identical to last year's but better" than any other product from any other company.

This is a forum troll being paid to troll and disguising it as a job. "It looks the same; it must be the same phone" is crap we delete these days.

TS -- you're way off base, IMO.

Ken Segall is a marketing expert -- someone whose job is to make people want what (in this case) Apple has to sell.

He has the bona fides!

The naming of a product is addressed to the non-techies out there who do not (necessarily) buy according to specs, looks, reputation... rather than the impression that they are getting the latest, greatest whatever.

Segall is saying that product naming should connote that -- and the dos y dos, allemande left: "ProductName n", "ProductName nS" in alternate years defeats the purpose... and Apple is missing an opportunity.

Also, I think you are out of line calling him a forum troll -- it appears to be a knee-jerk reaction... just because he says something with which you disagree.
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post #50 of 199
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
The new iPhone.

 

There.

Is that a strong enough message?

 

Even from a standpoint of that not being a "name" for the device, it is. That it continues to do as well as it has been shows the "S" name doesn't diminish anything, and it's certainly not wrong to use that naming convention.

 

Nor has it been shown wrong to give arbitrary number names, though that doesn't make said names any more sensible.

 


Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post
Also, I think you are out of line calling him a forum troll…
 

You're right; that does need clarification. It's the same argument as those made by the Anti-Apple Brigade, wherein the phone is "the same" if the case doesn't change. 

 

I probably should have put it in quotes or something.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #51 of 199
The "new iPad" moniker seemed to signal a shift in naming for iOS devices, but the company never adopted it for the iPhone and appears to have dropped the practice with the fourth-generation iPad.

 

Depends on what you mean by "dropped the practice."

 

Yes, the latest iPad is called "iPad with Retina display," not "the new iPad."

But no, the numeral "4" isn't used in any iPad branding anywhere on Apple.com.

It appears only once in the Apple.com iPad home page and in the iPad overview page.

It's the "4" in "$499."

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post #52 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

The new iPhone.

There.
Is that a strong enough message?
That is in fact how most people read it whether it has an 's' or a number attached. Anything that comes after 'iPhone' is secondary except when it it connotes 'new'. Most people would say 'I have an iPhone', and that really says it all. Rarely do you need to know more. The S means upgrade, and a new number means new iPhone. It's pretty simple. The question is whether keeping the same form factor is a good idea or not from a marketing pov.
It has been shown that people 'get' the concept of an upgrade an are happy with it. The iPhone 5 really does not need a redesign, let's face it, but we can all appreciate beefed up specs.
I don't think the Apple naming convention is perfect, but then again I don't think it is that important. People understand NEW, and UPGRADE.
post #53 of 199
"Tacking an S onto the existing model number sends a rather weak message," Segall writes. "It says that this is our 'off-year' product, with only modest improvements."

Wrong. It says, this is what the iPhone 4 or 5 et. el. would have been had we access to the faster processor, greater battery, more memory, better camera... You could say that 's' stands for the superior of the product we released last year...

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post #54 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackthemac View Post

Why is everyone dumping on this guy ?

His argument is that adding an S to the model number makes buyers PERCEIVE that no improvements have been made, not that the phones haven't improved. And I think he could well be correct: if the new model appears very similar to last year's, simply suffixing the name with an "S" is just going to reinforce the impression that it is a stopgap until the next round numbers model comes out, no matter what improvements have been made to the hardware.

If buyers perceive that nothing has changed... then that's their problem.

Apple's marketing kicks in and TELLS you all the stuff that have been improved.

Apple made sure that everyone knew that the iPhone 4S was quite an improvement over the iPhone 4

Faster processor, better camera, Siri...

I see what you're saying... that a person might not understand what an "S" model is.

Then again... Apple makes sure to highlight the improvements. It's kinda hard to ignore "It's the most amazing iPhone yet..."

post #55 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The former Apple ad man also takes issue with Apple's apparent abandonment of the "new" naming convention it seemed to have adopted with the introduction of the third-generation iPad. The "new iPad" moniker seemed to signal a shift in naming for iOS devices, but the company never adopted it for the iPhone and appears to have dropped the practice with the fourth-generation iPad.

 

So what would he suggest after "New", New New, Newer New, Next New???

 

"New" as a model name is never going to create a long lasting series.

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post #56 of 199
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That it continues to do as well as it has been shows the "S" name doesn't diminish anything, and it's certainly not wrong to use that naming convention.

 

Nor has it been shown wrong to give arbitrary number names, though that doesn't make said names any more sensible.

 

Agree.  You want the 2013 iPhone?  Well it's probably going to be called the "5S."  Whatever.

 

I just think it's slightly awkward to keep using the same number for 2 years, adding an "S" suffix in the 2nd year.

The "S," to me anyway, implies a variant on a theme.  Like the Porsche Carrera 4 and Porsche Carrera 4S.

They are both current year cars, and they're sold side by side, but the "S" is faster and costs more.

 

But I think it would be equally awkward if Apple had called the 3GS the "4," for example.

Because the "S" odd-year models are essentially higher-performance variants of the previous year's non-S model.

 

Maybe it would make more sense to call the iPhones "the 2013 iPhone," "the 2014 iPhone," etc.

It would eliminate all confusion over the model year of each phone.  And it would make the current

model even more appealing.  Because really, who wants last year's phone?

 

The problem with attaching a model year to each iPhone is that Apple has only ever released iPhones in the

second half of the year.  That "2013" model year will only be current for a few months before calendar year

2014 rolls around.  It shortens the shelf life of the branding.  Going back to the auto industry, this is why there

are already 2014 cars on the road even though 2014 is almost 9 months away.  To give each model year a

longer perceived shelf life.  The last remaining 2014 Taurus at your Ford dealer won't be "last year's model"

until 1/1/15, almost a year and 9 months from now.  Makes it easier to sell the last few cars of a model year.

But would Apple move iPhone release to the beginning of the  year just to stretch each model's "freshness"?  

Extremely doubtful.

 

Balancing all this is the fact that most US customers are on 2 year contracts and won't update their iPhones

every year anyway.  So no, there's not a massive difference between an iPhone N and iPhone NS.  But

there's a huge difference between an iPhone N and iPhone N+1 and between an iPhone NS and

iPhone (N+1)S. There's little or no pressure on Apple to make odd year phones vastly better than even year phones.

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post #57 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoffdino View Post

On the iPad topic, dropping the version number was about the most confusing thing Apple ever did. Instead of calling it a simple "iPad 4" they call it "iPad, fourth generation". In daily usage, people will call it the iPad 4 anyway, but then the "new iPad" is only the iPad 3. If only Apple had sticked the same simple principle for the GUI.

They have to drop the numbers at some point - and it seems to be fine with MacBooks and iMacs - you don't see "MacBook 5" or "iMac 6" - it's just MacBook and iMac. The simplest and easiest in my opinion is to let the name be the name with the release timing indicating the specific model, just like the do with their computers.
post #58 of 199

They don't send a "weak" message they send an accurate message. An "S" version of the iPhone is traditionally a relatively minor upgrade. This guy seems to like to over-market things which disappoints customers.

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post #59 of 199
I personally don't havea problem wi the "S" nomanclature. It's fine. I think of it like the auto industry does with cars. You have the Porche 911, then the 911GT, then the 911GTS. Same car but better internals. Nobody complains about that?

The model "s" come in a lot of cars too. Like Audi, dodge has the "RT" badge. Same goes with the Mustang. You have the base, and the GT. Chevy sometimes uses the "SS" badge.

It pretty clear to the customer who knows nothing about technology or marketing, and is able to associate the "s" model as the better one.
Edited by antkm1 - 4/7/13 at 9:35am
post #60 of 199
iPhoneS 4... iPhoneS 5... iPhoneS 6...

Seriously, It appears that Apple may be changing it's release cycle -- possibly releasing more than 1 update per year. If they do, the naming scheme could become more important!
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post #61 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoffdino View Post

Some great insight from a marketing guy. The "S" feels weird, it feels like a variant of the mainstream product. The public has been trained for decades that these monikers an improved variant, not a totally new product. Honda Accord LX, EX, EX-L are all trims of the same vehicles, with different equipment. Imagine Honda comes up with a new Accord LX for the odd years, and Accord EX for the even ones. Doesn't convey a very strong message.
.
Your example forgets two very important Accord that does just this before model changes. The Accord (value Package) VP and the (Special Edition) SE adds special features that are not normally packages together for a year or two before designs changes.
post #62 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

An "S" version of the iPhone is traditionally a relatively minor upgrade.

That is not accurate which backs up this guy's claim. The 4S was a huge update over the internals of the iPhone 4. Same goes for the iPhone 3GS over the iPhone 3G. In fact, the single smallest change of the internals was the original iPhone to the iPhone 3G which had the same CPU architecture, just clocked higher.

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post #63 of 199
Business is slow? Say something negative about Apple!
post #64 of 199
Problem Solved...

It's so obvious... When you think about it...

Instead of incrementing the number for each new model... Decrement it instead!
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post #65 of 199
What bothers me about the naming convention is... Well nothing. I'm much more annoyed by the new mobile ads on this website that cause you to unintentionally trigger them while scrolling the damn page. (The page curl/overleaf ads)
post #66 of 199
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

But I think it would be equally awkward if Apple had called the 3GS the "4," for example.

 

Least of which because it was the 3rd iPhone. lol.gif


Maybe it would make more sense to call the iPhones "the 2013 iPhone," "the 2014 iPhone," etc.

It would eliminate all confusion over the model year of each phone.  And it would make the current

model even more appealing.  Because really, who wants last year's phone?

 

Bingo!


The problem with attaching a model year to each iPhone is that Apple has only ever released iPhones in the

second half of the year.

 

Have the numbers be internal and for support documents only, just like their computer lines. Have the product sold, marketed as, and named "iPhone", regardless of the version. 


That solves that problem! 

 

Apple is still selling the "Early 2010" Mac Pro (okay, that's out of my system; it's really the "Late 2012", but who the FRICK considers "not an update" as an update?)… in 2013. But on the site and in all sales documentation, it's the "Mac Pro" only.

 

Also, *coughiWork'09cough* 1wink.gif

 

…perceived shelf life.  The last remaining 2014 Taurus at your Ford dealer won't be "last year's model"

until 1/1/15, almost a year and 9 months from now. 

 

Of course, that goes back to "perceived", as the 2015 models will be out in spring of 2014…


But would Apple move iPhone release to the beginning of the  year just to stretch each model's "freshness"?  

Extremely doubtful.

 

Agreed. There'd have to be some other change made somewhere for that to be justified.


Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
That is not accurate which backs up this guy's claim. The 4S was a huge update over the internals of the iPhone 4. Same goes for the iPhone 3GS over the iPhone 3G. In fact, the single smallest change of the internals was the original iPhone to the iPhone 3G which had the same CPU architecture, just clocked higher.

 

But but but but but but case design!

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #67 of 199
...Or:


IPhone MMVII - iPhone MMXIII
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post #68 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

They don't send a "weak" message they send an accurate message. An "S" version of the iPhone is traditionally a relatively minor upgrade. This guy seems to like to over-market things which disappoints customers.
Please explain how the 4S was a "minor upgrade" to the 4?
post #69 of 199
Quote:
Apple is a company that prizes simplicity in nearly all things, but a former Apple adviser says the pattern the company uses to name its bestselling product is decidedly not simple and sends the wrong message about the iPhone.

Sorry, but this is driving me nuts.

Apple is a company that values simplicity, not prizes simplicity.
post #70 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That is not accurate which backs up this guy's claim. The 4S was a huge update over the internals of the iPhone 4. Same goes for the iPhone 3GS over the iPhone 3G. In fact, the single smallest change of the internals was the original iPhone to the iPhone 3G which had the same CPU architecture, just clocked higher.
I guess for a lot of people no changes to the industrial design equals minor upgrade. Makes no sense to me but people really seem to be hung up on whether the phone looks different aesthetically. Unless were talking about Samsung, of course. The S4 looks just like the S3 but when it's released it will be hailed as the best phone EVER, not an incremental update.
post #71 of 199

The Fact of the matter is that the 4S improved almost every single internal part.  The only thing that did not get upgraded was the screen.  Even the case was changed for better cellular reception and to better work with the new "world phone cellular chip inside"  The processor went from an A4 with dual core graphics to an A5 with 3Core graphics, memory went from 512 to 1Gig, Camera from 4 element lens 5 mp to 5 element lens with 8mp and infrared active filter, and F 2.4 for better low light reception, from bluetooth 2.1 to bluetooth 4 with better audio capabilities, 4S got Siri, 3d Maps....... The point is I could go on to ad nauseum but litterally every single internal component was upgraded in one way or another.

 

Articles like this are absolutely BS  because they look at the phone and because the outside is similar they "ASSUME"  that it is a minor upgrade.  Hence  the term "when you assume you make an ass out of u and me".

 

Most people that buy products are a lot smarter than the guy who this article is talking with.  I certainly was please with my purchase of a 4S vs the 4 i had and do not regret the upgrade which was every bit as good as when i bought the 4 from the 3G. 
 

post #72 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Sorry, but this is driving me nuts.

Apple is a company that values simplicity, not prizes simplicity.
You know what drives me nuts? When Apple execs are touting how thin a device is but refer to it as "only x millimeters or inches thin, when they should be saying thick.
post #73 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


You know what drives me nuts? When Apple execs are touting how thin a device is but refer to it as "only x millimeters or inches thin, when they should be saying thick.

Steve Jobs started that to make people concentrate on how thin the device is.  It was his way of getting people to focus on the "thinness" of the device instead of just saying it is x mm thick.  I think it is actually quite a smart marketing idea.

post #74 of 199

This appears to be one example of where Apple could really take a page out of the book of others.

 

For example, Microsoft:

 

Windows 98

Windows Millennium 

Windows XP

Windows Vista

Windows 7

Windows 8 (Now with added confusion)

 

Now THERE'S a company that knows what they're doing with naming conventions!

 

Alternatively, there is Samsung... lol.gif

 

 

Brightside

Stellar

Rugby

Captivate

Victory

Stratosphere

 

Or, my own personal favorite, the George Lucas naming convention:

 

iPhone - Episode 1 (The Phantom Reception Menace)

iPhone - Episode 2 (Attack Of The Samsung Clones)

iPhone - Episode 3 (Revenge Of The Apple Legal Team), etc, etc...

 

Come on, Apple.

 

Get your act together.

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post #75 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I guess for a lot of people no changes to the industrial design equals minor upgrade. Makes no sense to me but people really seem to be hung up on whether the phone looks different aesthetically. Unless were talking about Samsung, of course. The S4 looks just like the S3 but when it's released it will be hailed as the best phone EVER, not an incremental update.

The Galaxy S4 has a dozen new poorly integrated features to put on a marketing spec sheet. That's how it goes in Androidia.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #76 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post

The author says that Apple has been tacking on an "S"... "every other model"...

iPhone
iPhone 3G
iPhone 3GS
iPhone 4
iPhone 4S
iPhone 5

Unless I'm mistaken, they've only done this twice, so why the overblown reaction? Nobody knows what the next version will be called, but I think the "S" models are perfectly acceptable iterations of the existing model. Maybe a different monikor is needed, but not a full increment of the model number for every reason.

 

Next up... iPhone X, which runs a full blown version of OSX! :D

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GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #77 of 199
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
You know what drives me nuts? When Apple execs are touting how thin a device is but refer to it as "only x millimeters or inches thin, when they should be saying thick.

 

Apple's neither the only nor the first to do that. And I like it. Normally it's used in the "get thinner to the point of anorexia" society, but that it's being made a focus in the consumer computing market (where, while the internal focus has always been on 'faster-smaller-cheaper', the external had been BEIGEBOXLOOKATMYHEAVYMETAL before Apple) is a pretty smart marketing move.


Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
The Galaxy S4 has a dozen new poorly integrated features to put on a marketing spec sheet. That's how it goes in Androidia.

 

Ooh, are we moving to the nation-state analogies now? Those will be fun.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #78 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post

The author says that Apple has been tacking on an "S"... "every other model"...


iPhone

iPhone 3G

iPhone 3GS

iPhone 4

iPhone 4S

iPhone 5


Unless I'm mistaken, they've only done this twice, so why the overblown reaction? Nobody knows what the next version will be called, but I think the "S" models are perfectly acceptable iterations of the existing model. Maybe a different monikor is needed, but not a full increment of the model number for every reason.

Next up... iPhone X, which runs a full blown version of OSX! 1biggrin.gif

iPhone Panther?
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post #79 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

No one on Earth would tell you that it makes sense to call the 6th model of a product running the 6th version of its software on the 6th iteration of its processor "5".

 

Were it an Apple competitor, it would be still be mocked "six months out".

 

For goodness' sake, start thinking about this like a typical consumer rather than somebody who posts on an Apple enthusiast forum.

 

It wouldn't be mocked whether it was Apple or not, because 99% of the population doesn't know and doesn't care exactly how many phone models Apple or any other manufacturer has produced.

 

What would seem absurd to the general population is calling a product 'iPhone 6' when the last product was the 4S. People may have short memories, but they do know how to count to 6 without missing numbers out.

 

I don't believe that you can't perceive how the typical consumer would see a change from 4 to 6. Step out of the bubble.

post #80 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Least confusing, and they SHOULD have done it on the iPhone, too.

With the iPhone there is a counter argument that rarely applies to Macs. When a new Mac model is out they almost always remove the old model immediately, but with the iPhone they have continued to manufacturer and sell as *new* the older models since the iPhone 3G. The iPad has been sold the same way since the original save for the iPad 3 which was immediately removed when the iPad 4 was introduced. That said, I don't see it as an issue but I can certainly understand why someone at Apple might take issue with it.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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