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Analyst says Apple may launch new internet service, 'killer iOS app' after meeting with management - Page 2

post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

 

Huh?  How are customers hurt by Apple's dividend program?  Apple have enough money in the bank to pay the current dividend rate for years, they aren't missing any opportunities because of the dividend.

 

Anytime a company pays out money to a lot of people who didn't actually do anything to deserve the money (essentially pouring money down the drain), it's perfectly valid to worry about that company and the customers of that company.  

 

It's a complete waste of cash that benefits no one but a lot of wall street sharks that are already quite rich enough.  Who's to say they won't need money later and then the burning of all this cash won't look so good will it?  

 

If the money is superfluous, then Apple would be better off rewarding the people that actually got it where it is today (the customers), by reducing the margins on their products a little bit, than throwing it away to a lot of fat cats that don't need it, and certainly don't deserve it.  

post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

A better service, better integration, much larger user base, make artists support services like this (when everyone uses them).

 

Class.

 

Nah, it's shaping up to be just another middlin streaming service (not Internet Radio at all), that pays for itself by allowing you to buy right out of the stream.  

 

The problem with this is that it will only work if you have "middlin" tastes yourself.  It will either be a sort of AM radio top 40 hits thing, or you will be able to tell it what kind of music you like.  The way you will do that is by using things like their "Genius" service but the genius thing hardly works at all unless you like (again) "middlin" kind of crap music.  

Genius works primarily just by showing you tracks of artists that you've already listened to, and by showing you other artists within the same "genre."  The catch here of course is that (again) if you listen to anything other than top 40 sort of stuff, genres totally fail as well.  Notice for example the absolutely vast "Alternative" category that captures everything from girls with acoustic guitars to electro-punk and you will see the problem immediately.  

 

What you really want with Internet radio (which this really isn't), is moderated or curated stream.  You need an actual person or persons to pick the music for it to be anything other than a top 40 hits kind of deal.  This will not only be missing, you probably won't even be able to hook into a "real" internet radio station with this service.  If I could just click to buy off of the stream from my favourite internet radio stations, I would buy an album a day practically, but I'm not going to listen to crap hit after crap hit on Apple's stream just because the possibility exists of buying a song if I ever actually hear one I like.  

 

No one who really appreciates music will like or use this service.  Why would they?  

 

On the other hand, it's likely to be a big hit with the stupids.  

post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by realpaulfreeman View Post

I think the new information here is that more revenue might be extracted from developers, that suggests a completely new addition to the business model. The most likely option in that space I'd think would be electronic payments. If the passbook model is expanded to full electronic payments then the developer could earn income from financial transactions made from their parter apps, with Apple picking up a transaction fee.

So, buy a ticket to an event or for a flight on an airline directly from the phone. The result is billed to the credit card attached to the iTunes account, and the ticket added to passbook, Apple take a percentage on top of the credit card fee for each sale.

Well, in my dreams.... I'd like to see the AAPL share price go to$1000 :-)

Buy anything... from a latte to a new car...
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post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by realpaulfreeman View Post

So, buy a ticket to an event or for a flight on an airline directly from the phone. The result is billed to the credit card attached to the iTunes account, and the ticket added to passbook, Apple take a percentage on top of the credit card fee for each sale.
 

There are three types of people in this world: Those who are good with math and those who are not! lol.gif

 

So what I read in your post is that if I buy an airline ticket, at let's say, Expedia, and it costs $600, I could buy the very same ticket through Apple for only $900 or is Expedia expected to pay Apple $200?

 

Of course if Apple were to become a bank...well that would be another story all together. Apple Bank, Inc. then they could cut out the credit card company completely, but they would not be getting 30% of the transaction, I can tell you that. Maybe 3% at best just like the credit card companies charge now.

 

I pay BMW Bank around 2% APR right now to finance my car.


Edited by mstone - 4/11/13 at 9:03am

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post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

Is it just me that thinks that monetizing users (who already pay for their hardware... and they're not exactly inexpensive) or developers (who're there to make money, not to make Apple richer) sounds like a Google idea?

I think that you are looking at this from the wrong perspective:

Apple could/will be enabling users by allowing them to use their devices to more conveniently do things -- like purchasing (and paying for) things more easily... and, possibly less expensively.

Apple could/will be enabling developers to make more income for their apps by providing services like credit transactions/financing and commissions for using those services.
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post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by walTARINA View Post

Hiring Lynch obviously points towards Xcloud (Aperture, FinalCut, Logic) but since Apple hasn't been that active with pro-apps than with mass consumer apps, it sounds a bit too much to hope for...

Excellent point... Lynch was responsible for [cloud] subscriptions and wireless [mobile] device development... I assume the latter is software for mobile devices to interface Adobe computer or cloud apps.

The "pro" apps would be a good place to start as there are exponentially fewer users of pro-apps than consumer apps -- more digestible startup traffic, bandwidth, problems. etc.

Quote:
iWork.com beta existed for some time, and I have been wondering if it ever comes back, integrated in iCloud. Microsoft is delaying Office for iOS (and even for their Metro-interface), this could be a good opportunity for Apple while thinking of their corporate customers. Office is an expensive bundle and includes a LOT of things that an avarage person does not need. iWork update is long overdue, even though it really doesn't need much improvements since it is not broken in any ways.

Agree on iWork: 1) Update it; 2) Feature parity between OSX and iOS versions; Sell the hell out of it (possibly free on iDevices) -- the "Office Suite" for the rest of us.
Quote:
I don't think that either of the above mentioned could be understood as "killer apps", so it must be something new - a radio perhaps, re-invented.
But why Lynch??? And what happened to AppleTV speculations in this context?

Wish we got iTunes Cloud/Match in Finland as well.




I think the killer app is "purchasing power" in the hands of hundreds of millions of people -- including everyone, say, from 5-years-old to 95-years-old (and above).

Here's how it works:

The parent has a credit card on file with iTunes (Might even be an Apple-branded credit card)

Each member of the family has one or more iTunes accounts, e.g. Cash, Credit, Savings, Allowance, Lay-Away, etc.

Friends or family could make deposits to any of these accounts:
  • Mom pays allowance to Jr.
  • Grandpa deposits $100 to granddaughter's special account to buy her first car
  • bro transfers some of his iTunes gift card to sis...
  • Dad pays the Electric bill
  • Sonny takes his gf to a movie (after buying her lunch in the school cafeteria)
  • Daughter fills up Mom's car with gas while borrowing it
  • After a rough day/month/year, Mom decides to splurge and buy that iPad Mini she's been wanting
  • Grandpa's Social Security Check is auto deposited -- and his health care supplement auto paid


So, now we have hundreds of millions of people (especially the 10-17 demographic) with their iDevice containing "virtual cash" and a "virtual credit card" with them at all times -- they have money to spend and are ready to spend it.
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 4/11/13 at 10:26am
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post #47 of 51
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In the near term, Huberty said Apple could make a surprise announcement at the upcoming Worldwide Developers Conference in June regarding a new type of internet service such as streaming music or a mobile payment system.

 

Streaming music: meh.

Mobile payment system: killer app.

 

 

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"We believe Apple could charge either developers or users for some of these services, which could boost Apple?s annuitized revenue stream and better monetize its large user base," Huberty writes. "For example, Apple could offer a streaming music service using a freemium model." Freemium apps allow users to download and use certain titles for free, with costs recouped through advertisements or in-app purchases. Sometimes these apps offer to remove ads for a certain price.

 

I fear that iAd is going to become a larger and larger source of revenue for Apple.

In 20 years, hardware prices will have come down so much that not even Apple could keep its profitability up.

They'll need to transition to services-based, content-based, and of course, ad-based revenue models.

 

 

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple is rumored to be working on an Internet radio service, dubbed "iRadio," though disagreements between the company and content owners over royalty rates are supposedly holding up proceedings. A report last week claimed Apple was close to inking a deal with Warner Music and Universal Music Group, but there has yet to be an official announcement regarding such an arrangement.
 

 

iRadio?  Not a killer feature.  Not a killer app.

Apple has already remade the music industry in its own image.

But hey, iRadio would be one step in breaking up iTunes into smaller apps.   On OS X and Windows, anyway.

 

 

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

As for the app, the analyst offers the example of mobile payments, an area into which Apple has already dipped a toe with Passbook. Such a new feature, Huberty argues, could help drive iPhone 5S sales in lieu of a design overhaul.
 

 

Mobile payments?  Killer feature and/or killer app.

Apple can and will eventually revolutionize retail shopping.  Just a matter of time.

 

I hope Apple implements some kind of biometrics-driven login plus a mobile payment system that leverages Apple's 500 million iTunes accounts.  That combination would 1) vastly improve the user security experience and 2) leverage an enormous credit card-holding customer base in a way that few other consumer-facing companies can.  (Amazon being one of the other few, of course.)

 

This is another way for Apple to transition to a services-based business model over time.  They provide a simple and secure way for consumers to use iOS devices to buy things in brick-and-mortar stores as well as online, take a small cut of every transaction, and their future profitability is assured.  Apple killed off the CD, they're working to kill off DVD/BD.  Next step: killing off those little plastic credit cards.  (And ATM cards, if banks get on the bandwagon.)

 

I'd add that I think Apple needs to simultaneously roll out an improved biometrics-driven security mechanism and an iTunes account-based mobile payment system.  Individually, they would be very strong steps forward.  Together, they're killer.

 

But can Apple cram all that hardware and software into iPhone 5S / iOS 7 / iCloud (and millions of retailers around the world)?  Not sure they could do it in the 5S time frame.  But I'd bet a dollar it will all be in place by next year when the iPhone 6 is rolled out.


Edited by SockRolid - 4/11/13 at 10:11am

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post #48 of 51

Seriously, all I want is my iDisk back.

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post #49 of 51
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Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

Seriously, all I want is my iDisk back.

I agree 100%. I hate using SkyDrive and would really like to have iDisk again.
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post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In the near term, Huberty said Apple could make a surprise announcement at the upcoming Worldwide Developers Conference in June regarding a new type of internet service such as streaming music or a mobile payment system.

Streaming music: meh.
Mobile payment system: killer app.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"We believe Apple could charge either developers or users for some of these services, which could boost Apple?s annuitized revenue stream and better monetize its large user base," Huberty writes. "For example, Apple could offer a streaming music service using a freemium model." Freemium apps allow users to download and use certain titles for free, with costs recouped through advertisements or in-app purchases. Sometimes these apps offer to remove ads for a certain price.


I fear that iAd is going to become a larger and larger source of revenue for Apple.
In 20 years, hardware prices will have come down so much that not even Apple could keep its profitability up.
They'll need to transition to services-based, content-based, and of course, ad-based revenue models.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple is rumored to be working on an Internet radio service, dubbed "iRadio," though disagreements between the company and content owners over royalty rates are supposedly holding up proceedings. A report last week claimed Apple was close to inking a deal with Warner Music and Universal Music Group, but there has yet to be an official announcement regarding such an arrangement.

 


iRadio?  Not a killer feature.  Not a killer app.
Apple has already remade the music industry in its own image.
But hey, iRadio would be one step in breaking up iTunes into smaller apps.   On OS X and Windows, anyway.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

As for the app, the analyst offers the example of mobile payments, an area into which Apple has already dipped a toe with Passbook. Such a new feature, Huberty argues, could help drive iPhone 5S sales in lieu of a design overhaul.

 


Mobile payments?  Killer feature and/or killer app.
Apple can and will eventually revolutionize retail shopping.  Just a matter of time.

I hope Apple implements some kind of biometrics-driven login plus a mobile payment system that leverages Apple's 500 million iTunes accounts.  That combination would 1) vastly improve the user security experience and 2) leverage an enormous credit card-holding customer base in a way that few other consumer-facing companies can.  (Amazon being one of the other few, of course.)

This is another way for Apple to transition to a services-based business model over time.  They provide a simple and secure way for consumers to use iOS devices to buy things in brick-and-mortar stores as well as online, take a small cut of every transaction, and their future profitability is assured.  Apple killed off the CD, they're working to kill off DVD/BD.  Next step: killing off those little plastic credit cards.  (And ATM cards, if banks get on the bandwagon.)

I'd add that I think Apple needs to simultaneously roll out an improved biometrics-driven security mechanism and an iTunes account-based mobile payment system.  Individually, they would be very strong steps forward.  Together, they're killer.

But can Apple cram all that hardware and software into iPhone 5S / iOS 7 / iCloud (and millions of retailers around the world)?  Not sure they could do it in the 5S time frame.  But I'd bet a dollar it will all be in place by next year when the iPhone 6 is rolled out.


You are correct about mobile payments... but I prefer to think of this as "personal purchasing power"...

Several years ago, KDDI the Japanese Telecom had a series of videos on their web site called "Knock! Knock! Ubiquitous".

The videos showed integration of mobile video devices containing: chat, telephony, GPS, mapping, etc, into the daily lives of average users... from buying lunch from a food truck; making ride reservations and purchasing "tickets" to an amusement (including transportation to the park); buying "virtual" real-time golf lessons with a pro (combining your TV as output and your mobile device as input for swing analysis; finding nearby store that had that certain product for sale, getting directions to the store, buying it and scheduling delivery...

I wish those videos were available today -- as every futuristic concept is coming true... I believe we are on the verge of becoming a moneyless society...

One thing that really stands out in my memory was the mobile device -- It was about the size of the new Sammy 6.3" phone but was used like a tablet (mostly in landscape mode). It was a completely transparent rectangle slab -- with, maybe, a thin black border on each end (1/4 inch wide at most).

It, and the services it provided, were ubiquitous!


IMO, Apple is the only company in the world with the financial resources to accomplish this -- and it already has most of the hardware and supporting infrastructure in place.


"[Purchasing] Power to the People!"


Edited by Dick Applebaum - 4/11/13 at 11:19am
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post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


I believe we are on the verge of becoming a moneyless society...

 

I actually like cash, not least the anonymity it affords the holder.

 

Personally I would not want payment gateways provided by the maker of my phone, I would however have fewer concerns about a 3rd party providing the service. 

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