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Google's Schmidt: We'd like Apple have Google Maps as default on iOS - Page 4

post #121 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkVader View Post

I agree with Schmidt, I'd love to have Google Maps as default. 

 

I've tossed Apple's map app in a folder, I never use it.  Apple tried to reinvent the wheel with their maps, and failed miserably, crashed, and burned.  They need to admit their mistake and suck up to Google.

 

Why doesn't Samsung agree with you?

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post #122 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Google phone maps started back in 2005 with Google Local for Mobile for any Java enabled handset. It had road and satellite images, GPS support, directions, local search and results dialing. Traffic was later added in 2006 when the name was changed to Google Maps for Mobile.

 

 

As for the iPhone, Apple added maps relatively late in its development before showing it off.
 
Quote:
On Halloween in 2006—just months before the iPhone was announced—Apple's product-marketing head, Phil Schiller, and other executives met with Google engineers to determine how the iPhone could use Google's mapping data to let people see their locations and get directions. 
 
Quote:
...numerous interviews with former Apple employees in the wake of the maps controversy made it clear that Mr. Jobs and other executives rarely paid as much attention to Internet services as they did to the devices for which Apple is best known. Nor did they show the kind of consistent foresight in this area that has served the company so well in designing hardware and software.
 
Including a maps app on the first iPhone was not even part of the company’s original plan as the phone’s unveiling approached in January 2007. Just weeks before the event, Mr. Jobs ordered a mapping app to show off the capabilities of the touch-screen device.
 
Two engineers put together a maps app for the presentation in three weeks, said a former Apple engineer who worked on iPhone software, and who declined to be named because he did not want to speak publicly about his previous employer. The company hastily cut a deal with Google to use its map data.
 

 


Don't believe all the media.  WSJ is more trust worthy than NYT.  When Jobs introduced the iPhone to the world in January 2007 the biggest feature he demoed is using the Maps app to order coffeee from Starbucks.  NYT quote a former anonymous engineer story is pure fabrication.  Two engineers in three weeks and the Maps app was working flawlessly?  And you believe such a story?  NYT writer is a liberal arts major for sure.  This is how you make things up? 


Edited by tzeshan - 4/18/13 at 5:24pm
post #123 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post


Don't believe all the media.  WSJ is more trust worthy than NYT.  When Jobs introduced the iPhone to the world in January 2007 the biggest feature he demoed is using the Maps app to order coffeee from Starbucks.  NYT quote a former anonymous engineer story is pure fabrication.  And you believe such a story?  This is how you make things up? 


It seems NYT has an ax to grind toward Apple.  It won an iEconomy award for investigating Apple.  Hundreds of US corporations are producing in China.  Why does it single out Apple and fool the readers like only Apple is doing so?  May be NYT need to be investigated by itself. 

post #124 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post


It seems NYT has an ax to grind toward Apple.  It won an iEconomy award for investigating Apple.  Hundreds of US corporations are producing in China.  Why does it single out Apple and fool the readers like only Apple is doing so?  May be NYT need to be investigated by itself. 

I disagree and have already explained why. Apple has always used the NYT whenever showing a newspaper on a iDevice and Pogue who's the NYT lead tech writer is very pro-Apple. Look at it this way way, if CE were drugs then Samsung, Motorola, HTC, would be low level drug dealers while Apple would be a drug kingpin. Who does law enforcement pay most attention to? Apple makes and sells the most so they're the biggest offender if the allegations are true. Nobody wants to read about what goes on in the factories Asus uses. Before Apple it was Nike being dragged through the mud. If you want to be top dog then you got to take ALL that comes with it both good and bad.
Edited by dasanman69 - 4/18/13 at 5:43pm
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post #125 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Two engineers in three weeks and the Maps app was working flawlessly?  And you believe such a story? 

 

Sure, I've had to implement map applications using APIs from Google and Bing in less time than that ... by myself... as have many others in this world.

 

So it's quite believable that two guys working hard could do it, especially with Google expertise available to personally explain the APIs and/or tweak them to requests.

 

Plus the developers only needed to come up with a working version good enough for a fairly quick demo.  Then they had almost six more months before the iPhone actually went on sale, to fine tune the app.

post #126 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Sure, I've had to implement map applications using APIs from Google and Bing in less time than that ... by myself... as have many others in this world.

 

So it's quite believable that two guys working hard could do it, especially with Google expertise available to personally explain the APIs and/or tweak them to requests.

 

Plus the developers only needed to come up with a working version good enough for a fairly quick demo.  Then they had almost six more months before the iPhone actually went on sale, to fine tune the app.


Are you eating your own words?  You said no Google engineers were involved in iPhone development.

post #127 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Are you eating your own words?  You said no Google engineers were involved in iPhone development.

 

Even if they helped with the Maps API, no Google engineers had to be involved in iPhone development.  In fact, they'd be unlikely to be told any details.

 

For example, not long ago I had to switch an app from Google maps to Bing maps.  Along the way, I ran into some problems using SSL.  Since we have a support contract with Microsoft, I contacted them for help with their APIs.  In the end, they even had to change their security certificates to make things work.

 

At no time did Microsoft see my application or even know exactly what it did.  All that mattered was how the APIs interfaced.

 

Likewise, Google could give Apple plenty of Maps API support, even down to making additions or changes if necessary, without ever seeing the iPhone OS, or even knowing it was for a phone.

 

Heck, Apple didn't even let most of its OWN people see the whole iPhone at one time during development.  Hardware engineers only saw a simple, ugly test UI, and software engineers used a plain box with an external LCD for development.  Neither saw the device and UI together until it went public.  Certainly Google support would not be shown.

 

However, like I said, perhaps you're right that the Maps API support was where some leaks came from.  Perhaps an Apple engineer let slip that he was building in touch support, or needed tiles to come in while scrolling around with a fingertip, etc.

post #128 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Even if they helped with the Maps API, no Google engineers had to be involved in iPhone development.  In fact, they'd be unlikely to be told any details.

 

For example, not long ago I had to switch an app from Google maps to Bing maps.  Along the way, I ran into some problems using SSL.  Since we have a support contract with Microsoft, I contacted them for help with their APIs.  In the end, they even had to change their security certificates to make things work.

 

At no time did Microsoft see my application or even know exactly what it did.  All that mattered was how the APIs interfaced.

 

Likewise, Google could give Apple plenty of Maps API support, even down to making additions or changes if necessary, without ever seeing the iPhone OS, or even knowing it was for a phone.

 

Heck, Apple didn't even let most of its OWN people see the whole iPhone at one time during development.  Hardware engineers only saw a simple, ugly test UI, and software engineers used a plain box with an external LCD for development.  Neither saw the device and UI together until it went public.  Certainly Google support would not be shown.

 

However, like I said, perhaps you're right that the Maps API support was where some leaks came from.  Perhaps an Apple engineer let slip that he was building in touch support, or needed tiles to come in while scrolling around with a fingertip, etc.


OK  I am getting a better picture of what happened between Apple and Google.  Google Android started to copy iOS after January 2007.  This is why it takes until late 2009 for Google and HTC to be able to sell the first copycat Android phone. 

post #129 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post


Ok, I am getting a better picture of what happened between Apple and Google.  Google Android started to copy iOS after January 2007.  This is why it takes until late 2009 for Google and HTC to be able to sell the first copycat Android phone. 

You're off by a year. The HTC G1 was released in October 2008, and was still very different from the iPhone to be a copycat. Actually none of the 'Google' could ever be mistaken for a iPhone.
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post #130 of 130

The problem for Apple is that all their stuff is 'non web' and thus more obscure by nature.

 

They really need to give some commitment to the web.

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