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Microsoft backing off Metro, plans boot-to-desktop mode for Windows 8.1 - Page 2

post #41 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).

I don't use it for launching apps, because they all fit in the dock anyway. But what it's good for is uninstalling apps bought from the MAS. The Mac App Store installs apps as admin so if you try to simply drag their icon to the trash you have to enter an admin password, but if you instead click the wiggly X in Launchpad you don't have to enter any password.

post #42 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


So, what will happen to the "Win...", er, ah... "Tiles Everywhere" mantra?

 

 

Let's dance !

post #43 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Objectively bad. And I love that.

I actually like Modern and use it on all 3 computers I frequent, so your "objective" is not my "objective", which makes both very "subjective". Yes there are quirks (like Shutdown and Restart) but all in all, I like it more that W7. Wouldn't upgrade across all my machines otherwise.
post #44 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

That seriously sounds like the boilerplate response we got from our Fujitsu sales guy who wanted us to take windows 8 on a 50 desktop order. We laughed soooo hard in his face, Not one of those reasons is good enough to move from windows 7. And don't even mention windows server 2012 jeeesus...

That is fine, people often laugh at things they don't understand.

Re Server 2012, well, you mentioned it already. Care to elaborate?
post #45 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Whew. For a moment, I thought Microsoft had come to their senses.
I am relieved to hear that they are still heading in the wrong direction with regard to the Windows UI. If they had brought back the Start Menu (as opposed to simply booting to the desktop), I might have thought they were backpedaling on Metro, but I am pleased to hear that they still want to pursue this strategy of making Windows annoying for non-tablet, non-touchscreen users.

Looking at current trends, I wouldn't be surprised if, in a year time or so, non-touchscreen laptops and desktop monitors become minority compared to touchscreen counterparts.

But I digress... story is that there will be Start Menu in Desktop mode, but users will also be able to open Modern Start Screen. I think some of current 3rd party solutions already have this, so it makes sense in a way... but how is MS going to do that or, eventually, is any of that is true, we'll have to wait a bit longer.
post #46 of 61

I know there's some Windows guys that come on here and make ignorant comments about OS X... but I think you're being a little hard on Microsoft.  For once, they are not only trying to be innovative but attempting to adapt to the market instead of standing still like they did from 1995-2007.  I'll admit Metro is clunky with a keyboard and mouse, and they really should have made a stronger effort to introduce a better multi-touch peripheral to support it.  But Metro isn't an entire failure, the built in Tiles and 3rd party apps like Netflix provide a more enjoyable experience than using the browser.  Again, the problem comes from the fact that Metro is not designed for a Keyboard+Mouse, and they should have added standard windows start button option for Business users.  Use Windows 8 with the Logitech Wireless Touchpad, and the experience is actually quite fluid.  It's not as good as OS X implementation of multi-touch, I don't think most people would argue with you there.  But for someone who's open minded about OS evolution in the coming years, it's not nearly as bad as some of you are making it out to be.

post #47 of 61
Another innovation from Microsoft!
post #48 of 61

I move for a vote of No Confidence against Chancellor Metro.

 

ascii View Post

Apple have also been moving elements of their touch GUI in to their desktop OS don't forget. They have just been a bit more selective about it. In fact Launchpad is kind of a "start screen."

A gentle and fast-loading overlay, from a single button. Couldn't be easier, and people who don't want it or don't know about it, never have to interact with it or look to 3rd party disabling solutions.

 

igriv View Post

Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).

I use either the Dock or a quick Spotlight search, since Spotlight is optimized for no-mouse use (cmd-space, start typing, hit enter to launch the top result).

[ninja edit] The Windows 7 start menu is actually good at this too.

 

Mundty View Post

I think you're being a little hard on Microsoft.  For once, they are not only trying to be innovative but attempting to adapt to the market instead of standing still like they did from 1995-2007. ...

... But for someone who's open minded about OS evolution in the coming years, it's not nearly as bad as some of you are making it out to be.

This isn't grade school, where they get points for effort. Google may have mainstreamed the idea of hyping 'beta' products, but at least they didn't charge us for the privilege.

 

Windows Phone 8 is somewhat ok, but Windows 8 PC should have seen another year or two of development and testing on non-engineers. I don't have a problem with the Metro concept per se, but its flawed desktop implementation, which is then forced on users. Basic functions are not obvious or intuitive, at least to regular humans. And it's completely unsuitable for any business or productivity environment. For a company who blasts iOS devices as only being fit for consumption and not creation...

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post #49 of 61
Windows is so big and clunky. Take a look at basic stuff. Want to change your screen saver? Here's a Windows 95 dialog to do it. The Windows control panel is the most difficult monolith to navigate, with its mixed interfaces, some dating back over 15 years. By comparison, look at OS X. System preferences is light and compact, and everything stays in one neat window. Microsoft keeps adding new interfaces so that the OS looks like an old house that's been renovated too many times. They need to rip it down and rebuild it.
post #50 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In an apparent attempt to have its latest operating system better appeal to business customers, Microsoft reportedly plans to add a "boot to desktop" mode to its Windows 8.1 update, allowing users to bypass the Metro Start Screen.

I doubt this will fix the problem because it will most likely be enabled by default. Microsoft will want that Store icon front and center much to the annoyance of the likes of Valve.

I can see this UI making its way to the next XBox too.
post #51 of 61
I really don't understand anyone who'd want a computer with fingerprints and smudges all over it. So many of my co-workers' keyboards are absolutely disgusting... I can't wait to see what touch brings to their world.
post #52 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).

 

I do.  I hated it at first but as time passed I started to actually like it.  Keep in mind I don't use any of the after market products like Quicksilver or Butler (I think that's the name) so this was a welcome addition.  Launchpad is especially helpful for resource hungry applications such as Xcode, Parallels, and Lotus Notes (yes our company still uses Notes).  I don't want these icons in the doc because one misplaced click usually ends up with my machine becoming unresponsive for a minute while the initial load occurs.

 

Now I can just hit F4 type "xc", "lo", "pa", etc. and have what I need.  I'm not saying there isn't a better way, but that's how I use it.

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Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
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post #53 of 61
Just continuing the MS tradition of one good OS followed by an underwhelming/bad OS.
post #54 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Does anyone actually use the Launchpad? (not a rhetorical question, I am curious).

 

I do. I don't like having a cluttered dock, so I deleted 90% of my dock icons and use the launcher for my less-used apps.

post #55 of 61
I knew Metro would never fly on desktops and laptops. And trying to get tablets to perform like a laptop is ridiculous too. Microsoft thinks they can create one solution for every type of device, but it's just not possible. Until they realise this, they will continually fail.
post #56 of 61
I bet Microsoft and Ballmer are filled with a sense of relief.
They've checked "mobile computing" off their to-do list.
Been there, done that, failed yet again, but they don't care.

Now they can go back to their core competency: milking legacy corporate IT.

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post #57 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCProfessor View Post

Dmint. I still use the worst os out their from an article I read somewhere... Vista and win8.

 

Professor you're too smart for me, I have no idea what you just said...  :-)

Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
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Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
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post #58 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by frxntier View Post

Windows is so big and clunky. Take a look at basic stuff. Want to change your screen saver? Here's a Windows 95 dialog to do it. The Windows control panel is the most difficult monolith to navigate, with its mixed interfaces, some dating back over 15 years. By comparison, look at OS X. System preferences is light and compact, and everything stays in one neat window. Microsoft keeps adding new interfaces so that the OS looks like an old house that's been renovated too many times. They need to rip it down and rebuild it.

Um... last time this was discussed, it turned out Win 8 is taking pretty much the same space as latest OSX.

In addition, to change screen saver or wallpaper on Win 8, you right-click on desktop and select "Personalize". You don't need Control Panel for that.

Yeah you do get some inherited clunkyness here and there, but a lot of things have received shortcuts in the meantime. Like right-click in lower left corner which gives you pretty much all the admin and config tools you'll ever need in one menu.
post #59 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by storneo View Post

I knew Metro would never fly on desktops and laptops. And trying to get tablets to perform like a laptop is ridiculous too. Microsoft thinks they can create one solution for every type of device, but it's just not possible. Until they realise this, they will continually fail.

This is really too personal to be accepted as general rule, either way.

I was a bit suspicious toward Modern/Metro so, when I upgraded my work PC back in September, I made a backup of my Win 7 configuration so I can revert back if need be. But I never did. Win 8 worked well for me from beginning, even if my work environment is quite unforgiving.

Some time later, I upgraded my personal laptop as well. It worked fine too, so I finally upgraded my personal desktop as well.

Regardless of bipolar nature of Moders/classic desktop switching, I prefer new Start Screen to Win 7 Start Menu. I always though Vista's and 7's Start menu a bit claustrophobic. At work, all my apps are classic so Start Screen is more or less all I do in Modern. On gaming machine, I do use some Modern apps (NZ Herald, Skype, Wikipedia, ComicsJolt etc) but also use Office, photo editing and games on classic. With laptop, I use mostly Modern apps - email, calendar, contacts with social media connectors etc. Lightroom is only frequently used classic application on laptop.

Like I said, this works for me just fine. Based on Microsoft recent financial results, it seems I'm not the only one, regardless how vocal opponents of Modern GUI are.
post #60 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

I use Windows 8 also, and it's OK, but what ARE the improvements over Win 7?

 

There isn't any in terms of usability. The entire interface is counter intuitive. Windows 8 is more like Windows 7.1. With the stupid "metro" screen slapped on top of Windows 7 and a few tweaks here and there.

 

The main issue users have with Windows 8 is the interface. Someone coming off a 5-7 year old PC many users will be completely alienated from Win8. The interface has radically changed, no start menu and all useful functions like cut and paste are gone.

 

Versus OS X, someone who bought a Mac a decade ago will recognize Mountain Lion, same can't be said for Windows users.

post #61 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikkO View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

I use Windows 8 also, and it's OK, but what ARE the improvements over Win 7?

There isn't any in terms of usability. The entire interface is counter intuitive. Windows 8 is more like Windows 7.1. With the stupid "metro" screen slapped on top of Windows 7 and a few tweaks here and there.

The main issue users have with Windows 8 is the interface. Someone coming off a 5-7 year old PC many users will be completely alienated from Win8. The interface has radically changed, no start menu and all useful functions like cut and paste are gone.

Versus OS X, someone who bought a Mac a decade ago will recognize Mountain Lion, same can't be said for Windows users.

Excellent point. I also don't 'get' W8. It's the consistency of OSX and iOS that works for me. Other call it 'stale', but I'm happy they way things are with Apple. And that's just my opinion, but funny enough, many people complain about Windows needing to relearn steps with every new version. Fortunately, they don't release a new verion every year. Actually, not that many at all (for me it was: 3.0, NT4, W95, 98, 2000, XP, Vista, W8) Curled toes at every iteration.
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