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Google's Android has flatlined in the U.S. as Apple's iPhone steals all growth - Page 3

post #81 of 118

What is the market in which Apple is doing the best, by far?

In that market which two carriers have the data most skewed in Apple's favor?

 

Answer those questions for yourself.

 

 

In any data set, if you pick not only the data that is most advantageous to you- but only the rosiest data within that small subset, and then try to paint that as an 'overall' picture... you're really not quite being honest with yourself.

 

Cherry picking is fine and expected, given this is AI, but I'm a little surprised at the willful avoidance of all else.  I guess people on either side will support anything that supports what they already want to believe.

post #82 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

The US smart phone market which is now essentially saturated is in it middle phase. Now will see how the split between Android and iOS settles down. A number of factors are emerging. the main one being how sophisticated the buyer is, having experienced their first smart phone and has had a few years to evaluate the two real alternatives. Its rather obvious why Android has flattened -  it has essentially replaced Symbian. The next 18 months will tell us if users will stay with Android or switch to either BB, Windows phone or iOS. I don't think Android has anywhere really to go except down from here once its complexities, lack of forwards compatibility with apps and susceptibility to viruses, trojans, payload attacks and adware become more apparent to the average user.

 

I agree in the US market -- but there's also the battle in the "emerging market." Apple apparently will rush to compete with dirt cheap phones at least in China and India. My wife got an Android phone -- she hates it other than the streaming music app which occasionally works (probably because of T-Mobile coverage more than anything else). So those TOP TIER Android phones might get repeat business, but the low end models might have soiled the user experience and those people probably think the iPhone is the way to go -- whether it's better than the top tier Android or not. That's not just smart phones -- that's the reality of any kind of product. The Android covering low end and top tier is both a blessing and a curse and Google SHOULD HAVE marketed a premium platform so that it could guarantee a good reputation.
post #83 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Thanks.  Excellent insight:  after all, why should we trust stats from research firms who provide them for a living when we can rely on unemployed bloggers who don't link to their sources?

 

So you're on record that next time any of those firms provide stats that favor Apple you'll be as quick to show your disdain?  We're all looking forward to it.

Because the numbers put out by these "research firms" never seems to match hard data. That's why. Every time you look at the available data on web browsing, ad hits, app sales, media (music, movie, TV show) sales, use of mobile devices for shopping, etc. etc., iOS always seems to have a share far higher than that put out by these "research firms" on 'shipments'.

 

They probably exaggerate the data because they have more Android clients, who knows. Maybe they pay these "research firms" more because they make Android look good.

 

I don't trust it when the data goes the other way either. Show me one post where I have gloated based on such bogus estimates.

 

As to whether the "unemployed blogger" is telling the truth, you can just as easily go out there and get it based on what ATT and VZW have actually reported from their quarterlies. Go out and do the research, if care to disprove this blogger.

 

You can't face actuals facts, that's the problem.


Edited by anantksundaram - 4/18/13 at 3:32pm
post #84 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

What is the market in which Apple is doing the best, by far?

In that market which two carriers have the data most skewed in Apple's favor?

Umm.... did you forget to glance at the headline before you jumped in to post?

post #85 of 118

The elephant in the room for android is the soon-to-be ubiquity of cheap iPhone 4s/5 models available for upgrade.

 

Once the iPhone 5s is out, the carriers will reprice the models as follows:

 

iPhone 4s: Free

iPhone 5:   $99

 

It used to be that android's biggest advantage was competing against the truly premium prices that Apple was charging.  The 4s still has an iconic design, good specs, and retina display.  It will eat into android marketshare once the 5s is out.

post #86 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

There is a very large demand for the HTC One right now.

 

Because you read it somewhere?
post #87 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


Thanks.  Excellent insight:  after all, why should we trust stats from research firms who provide them for a living when we can rely on unemployed bloggers who don't link to their sources?

 

So you're on record that next time any of those firms provide stats that favor Apple you'll be as quick to show your disdain?  We're all looking forward to it.

 

Or we could be like you.

 

When 5 different reports from various research companies all show similar findings where iOS is leading Android you will ignore them and find the 1 that supports a different position, and claim it's correct.

 

Your post has got to be the most hypocritical thing I've heard all day.

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post #88 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by bag of kittens View Post

The elephant in the room for android is the soon-to-be ubiquity of cheap iPhone 4s/5 models available for upgrade.

 

Once the iPhone 5s is out, the carriers will reprice the models as follows:

 

iPhone 4s: Free

iPhone 5:   $99

 

It used to be that android's biggest advantage was competing against the truly premium prices that Apple was charging.  The 4s still has an iconic design, good specs, and retina display.  It will eat into android marketshare once the 5s is out.


Really? Like  Apple doesn't do this every year? Wth are you on? 

post #89 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

I'm sorry, but is the author of this article blind and unable to read his own charts? Looking at the VZW graph, it's clear that iPhone sales peaked in 2012 at 6 million and have been on a decline to 4 million in the most recent quarter. If you look at the most recent quarter, iPhone sales have slumped to almost the same point as Android - the graphs are almost on top of each other. Latest quarterly iPhone numbers are not shown from AT&T.

This is a worthless and shoddy piece of "journalism" by any metric. Conclusions are drawn based on incomplete data, and the where complete data is available (Verizon) clearly shows Android and iPhone being neck-and-neck and completely disproving the headline and point of this piece.

Hey AppleInsider, stick to reporting rumors and stop trying to write your own articles. You are clearly out of your element.

 

I am sorry, but I think you ought to learn to read.   The author clearly points out the peaks, while correctly identifying the "flatline" in the Android sales across the graph.   You are comparing a single quarter.  The author is comparing total sales across the years.  All the peaks are iPhone.   You ought to learn to read and how to interpret charts before your criticize others.

post #90 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post


Didn't you just read this article? We're all just reading something from somewhere, how do we know for sure that these graphs are accurate?
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post #91 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

What's shocking to me is how there's no "bump" with an Android new product intro -- such as the SG3 -- in either ATT or VZW's graphs. Compare that to the massive spike when a new iPhone is introduced! Shocking, because one would not get that impression reading the tech news.

 

It's no wonder that these weasels don't put out actual shipment volumes or sales numbers.

 

Btw, where are all those gazillions of Android activations every day (that Rubin used to boast about) in these numbers?!lol.gif

I would bet that about 85 to 90% of those activations are cheapo feature phones or very cheap phones being sold in china or india where cheap is in,   phones like the Galaxy line would not sell well in countries like this because of locals ability to buy, and probably make up about 10 to 15% of android sales.  The cheap phones take the rest.   Google will take anything it sees as an activation but that does not mean that it is a high end smart phone.  Plus hell all of the two for ones and the free phone give aways, got to get rid of that old stock on the warehouse and store shelves somehow.

 

And as another point most of the cheapo phones are razor thin on margin, down in the .01% to 1 % area for profit too.

post #92 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

So we compare the trend of one brand to the trend of several other brands regrouped. No wonder that there's no seasonal variation!

Its the only way you can compare android to iOS, because there is no other iOS vendor than apple.  So it is a legitimate comparison of android phones to apple phones (iOS vs. Android).  The amazing thing is Apple YoY outsells all other android phone vendors on those carriers in the U. S.

 

Oh and by the way Android Fans always compare all other android phone vendors as a lump vs. Apples iPhone.  If we did a fair comparison of other vendors sales on an individual basis even samsungs with there galaxy line only, against apple they loose horribly in actual numbers.  But samsung never reports actual numbers and counts all of there dumb phones and cheap crap phones as competition against the iPhone when the only phone they make that directly competes with the iPhone is the Galaxy line. Which is there smallest selling phone line in numbers.

post #93 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Can you back any of this up?

google it   Samsung sold 100 million Galaxy phones since the lines inception (there numbers not mine)  Which is about 10% of that 1billion activation number for android that Shmidt has been dumping on the press.  So who makes up the other 900 million?  HTC?  Sony? Motorola?  Nexus?Android Tablets?(lol)  Think about that.  If the top android phone vendor makes up 10% with its made up "shipped numbers"  then the rest have to be low end phones.  Because there are not a helluva lot of High end Android phone vendors.   There were some good articles on ASYMCO about the china market and Indian Market and the tons of local phones and tons of cheap samsung and htc phones being sold there.

post #94 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

 

No, because I am on the waiting list for it (and yes, I have an iPhone, actually three of them, before you accuse me of being a fandroid).
 

 

You being on a waiting list doesn't directly validate there is a VERY large demand. It could mean a whole slew of tactics, issues, shipments, etc.

 

A perfect example, the Microsoft Surface. It has sold incredibly poor, but it was very hard to get one when it first came out. Mainly because M$ did not produce a large number of them. In fact, they even cut their orders in half a few months in. Another example would be the HP TouchPad, also hard to get in the beginning, sold so horrendously it was scrapped all together. See Hype Cycle. BTW: Apple does these types of hype build ups as well. 

 

Don't get me wrong, if I had to get an Android device, the HTC One would most likely be my first choice. But there hasn't been any official releases that demand is VERY large for that device.

 

If it is, we can come back to an article like this next year and see a spike on the android scale. 

 

 

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post #95 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Smartphone sales at AT&T and Verizon Wireless over the past two years show that Android isn't growing in the U.S. and that all new growth is coming from Apple's iPhone.

Which explains why Apple's share price is down almost 3% again today.

Oh, wait......
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post #96 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post

...the only phone they make that directly competes with the iPhone is the Galaxy line.

 

Actually the Galaxy S and Galaxy Note lines go up against iPhones, the Galaxy Tab line goes up against iPads, the Galaxy Player goes up against the iPod.

 

All the other Galaxy lines are low to mid range models.

 

Samsung has been very successful with their "Galaxy" marketing, it's Koolaid to their starry eyed acolytes.

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post #97 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Can you back any of this up?

 

Of course not, Android manufacturers tend not to release concrete figures, with them it's all a shell game.

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post #98 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by emig647 View Post

 

You being on a waiting list doesn't directly validate there is a VERY large demand. It could mean a whole slew of tactics, issues, shipments, etc.

 

A perfect example, the Microsoft Surface. It has sold incredibly poor, but it was very hard to get one when it first came out. Mainly because M$ did not produce a large number of them. In fact, they even cut their orders in half a few months in. Another example would be the HP TouchPad, also hard to get in the beginning, sold so horrendously it was scrapped all together. See Hype Cycle. BTW: Apple does these types of hype build ups as well. 

 

Don't get me wrong, if I had to get an Android device, the HTC One would most likely be my first choice. But there hasn't been any official releases that demand is VERY large for that device.

 

If it is, we can come back to an article like this next year and see a spike on the android scale. 

 

Especially once the Samsung bloggers "earning $$$ from home", started tearing in to them.

 

Their actions where they were caught in Taiwan is just the tip of an iceberg.

 

Incoming damage control in...

 

3...

 

2...

 

1...

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post #99 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Ah, so this justifies you randomly spouting?

 

Nope, reaching a conclusion based on what is known.

 

i.e. Samsung claimed 100 million Galaxy S phones sold. Schmidt claims 1 Billion Android activations.

 

Therefore around 90% of Android activations are not Samsung high end smartphones.

 

Given Samsung's dominance not much of the remaining 90% are high end smartphones from other manufacturers.

 

That means that most Android phones are low to mid range.

 

Given Android manufacturers reticence in giving out break downs of precise numbers then that is all we have to go on.

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post #100 of 118

Just another example of a disgusting, misleading headline with an agenda of negativity- it's shit like this that affects the stock price. 

 

http://money.cnn.com/2013/04/18/technology/mobile/verizon-iphone/index.html

 

"Verizon iPhone sales tumble 33%"

 

When the **** is it ok to compare a holiday quarter sales to the next, and then define that as "tumbling"? When, in the history of the universe, has a ny product INCREASED in sales after the holiday quarter? The correct way to measure growth and performance is YoY, and if they did that, they would have discovered that Verizon iPhone sales GREW 25% YoY- the only sane comparison that can be done. Yet, that headline would not have been misleading, sensational, or negative enough- so they decided to fudge that and go with this one, hoping to prey upon ignorant people who dont read the fineprint and realize how ridiculous of a headline that is

post #101 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

For a balanced overview, see: http://techland.time.com/2013/04/16/ios-vs-android/

 

Balanced based on "estimates" which even the author points out lead to conflicting reports.

 

Due to Android manufacturers not releasing concrete figures "estimates" are the only thing there is to go on.

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post #102 of 118
iPhone is like fertilizers--it makes subscribers grow.

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post #103 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

There is a very large demand for the HTC One right now.

Last quarter... HTC represented just 3% of all smartphone sales.

But now people are breaking down the door wanting the HTC One?

1confused.gif

People haven't been too focused on what HTC is producing lately... so I seriously doubt there will be that much much demand for the HTC One.

HTC's profits dropped 98% YOY last quarter too. I've even heard that HTC will be in serious trouble if the One doesn't deliver.

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post #104 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Last quarter... HTC represented just 3% of all smartphone sales.

But now people are breaking down the door wanting the HTC One?

1confused.gif

People haven't been too focused on what HTC is producing lately... so I seriously doubt there will be that much much demand for the HTC One.

HTC's profits dropped 98% YOY last quarter too. I've even heard that HTC will be in serious trouble if the One doesn't deliver.

Hope for the best... but prepare for the worst.

Nobody has been paying attention to HTC because they can't compete with Samsung in the advertisement game but they've produced much better devices than Samsung. If I weren't only a year into my contract I'd be choosing HTC as my next phone.
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post #105 of 118
You'd think at least one of those posts would have been reported before the thread devolved into DEATH WISHES... :roll eyes:

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post #106 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

First of all, I don't own any Android devices and probably never will. I own two MacBook Pros, one MacPro, one Mac Mini, bought two iMacs for friends and family in the last three years, and owned an iPhone 3G, 4 and 4S. The iPhone 5 is the first iPhone since the 3G that I haven't jumped on because it offered nothing compelling over the 4S, which is part of Apple's problem right now.

 

The carrier line charts clearly show iOS growth at AT&T, but flat iOS growth at Verizon. Remove the holiday bumps from the Verizon chart and what do you get? You get a little iOS above Android and a little below, but overall when you average out the peaks and valleys in the iOS Verizon chart you get something very similar to the Android line. The only thing this proves is that iPhone gets a nice holiday bump while Android does not.

 

None of your screaming and shouting is going to change the fact that at Verizon, iOS and Android are pretty much even once you average out the peaks and valleys. At AT&T, iOS is clearly king. However, you cannot draw any overall market conclusions from these graphs as a significant portion of iOS sales occur outside of the US.

 

I love Apple, I even own Apple stock. I understand the need to want to write these types of articles given all of the negative news lately. I just think this article is reaching a false conclusion based largely on AT&T numbers because the Verizon numbers are not really that impressive.

 

 

The lines do not show growth rates for Android and iOS. The lines show absolute numbers. Android sales at Verizon are esentially flat over the period. iOS is growing - but yes with seasonality.

post #107 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

There is a very large demand for the HTC One right now.

 

If I was in the market for an Android phone, the HTC One would be at the top of my list, no question. It looks like a fantastic phone. Unfortunately, I doubt this will translate into blockbuster sales. Yeah, there's a huge buzz on tech blogs etc. But Samsung has managed to convince everyone that they have the only phones worth considering in the Android space, and carriers seem utterly uninterested in anything else, pushing Galaxies as if they were the company itself. It doesn't hurt that Samsung's marketing budget leaves no room for anyone to breathe- last I checked it was like 4-5X that of Apple's. It's sad that other OEMs (ie. HTC) are basically being ignored, because the HTC One is a superior device to anything that Samsung makes, 

post #108 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

I'm sorry, but is the author of this article blind and unable to read his own charts? Looking at the VZW graph, it's clear that iPhone sales peaked in 2012 at 6 million and have been on a decline to 4 million in the most recent quarter. 

 

As usual, the retarded Apple bashers are out in full force. Let me enlighten you on something called "context." The reason why iPhone sales peaked in the last quarter of 2012 and declined in the most recent quarter is that you're comparing to the holiday season. That is always the quarter when Apple sales are at their peak. 


For a real comparison you need to look at year over year. Look again at that graph and compare Dec 2013 vs Dec 2012, and also Mar 2013 vs Mar 2012 and you'll see that iPhone sales trends are quite healthy. Meanwhile non-iPhone sales are flat across the board, if not declining.

post #109 of 118
I think it is to be expected that many people would make an android their first phone. To a lot of people, even a cheap one is a lot of money with data included, and they have to decide if it is worth it.

Once in, many get hooked and have little hesitation spending a lot more money when they ourgrow the phone. It makes sense that a significant percentage of those going high end will end up with an Apple. Even if it is only 25% that is millins of extra sales.

Android pushed massve adoption of smart phones and in doing so, in the long run, help sell apple phones as well as high end android phones. We can never take android out of the equation, but I doubt that Apple would be selling many more phones had android not come along. Filling that mid to low end range is good for all sellers of high end phones.
post #110 of 118
Quote:
Google's platform is functioning like training wheels for the iPhone.

Not quite, it's more like Android is teaching people to drive with square wheels and when the benefits of driving is well enough integrated they move on to Apple's 'round wheels' for a more holistic experience.
post #111 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

Look at Samsung's quarterly financials, and you will see that their revenue and profits are growing MUCH faster than Apple's. I assume this is due to their mobile phone business, since the other markets they are in are fairly mature.

I did look at Samsung's financials and neither did they outgrow Apple on revenues nor on profits. What happened last year is Samsung grew as fast as Apple for the first time in several years.

post #112 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

Nope, reaching a conclusion based on what is known.

 

i.e. Samsung claimed 100 million Galaxy S phones sold. Schmidt claims 1 Billion Android activations.

 

Therefore around 90% of Android activations are not Samsung high end smartphones.

 

Given Samsung's dominance not much of the remaining 90% are high end smartphones from other manufacturers.

 

That means that most Android phones are low to mid range.

 

Given Android manufacturers reticence in giving out break downs of precise numbers then that is all we have to go on.


You are distorting the figures a bit by presuming no other Android phone manufacturer has sold a single high-end phone, which isn't the case so it's more than 100 M  Then you are ignoring the Samsung Note.  In Nov 2012, Samsung announced they had sold 5 M note II's worldwide.  The previous month the figure was 3 M.  So if the sales of 2 M a month have continued, the sales of the Note II might be approaching 15 M by now.  They sold 10 M of the original Note by Sep 2012.

 

The true figure for high end android phones is probably at least 15%.

 

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JK Shin recently told reporters that they expect the Galaxy Note II to sell two times the current model or simply around 20m units.

http://sammyhub.com/2012/09/12/samsung-expects-galaxy-note-ii-sales-to-cross-20-million-units/

http://currenteditorials.com/2012/11/25/samsung-announces-galaxy-note-ii-sales-figures-over-five-million-phones-sold/

post #113 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

 

That appears to not be the case.

 

http://www.tech-thoughts.net/2012/07/global-smartphone-market-share-trends.html

 

One needs to look more closely at how "smartphone" is defined. And, more to the point, how people are actually using their phones to accomplish a variety of tasks.

 

What has been happening is that the overall "smartphone" is growing significantly as "dumb" and "feature" phones are replaced with "smartphones". Apparently, according to various analysts, "smartphones" now comprise just north of ALL mobile phones and are rapidly going to subsume all mobile phones as all mobile phones soon become "smartphones" simply because technology and mobile OSs are advancing.

 

At the same time, one wonders if putting Android on a phone, any phone, makes it a "smartphone" by definition. That certainly seems to be the case. Most of the Android phones produced and sold in the world are not Samsung S3 equivalents, which, as we can see from real sales data, do quite poorly against the iPhone. It is only when the iPhone is compared to ALL "smartphones" from ALL manufacturers, on ALL carriers in ALL the world, that you can come to your conclusion that Apple's poor little iPhone is not doing so hot all on its lonesome. Now, Apple only ever sold "smartphones", so it didn't have a look in at more than half the market of all mobile phones. Plus, Apple is only available on at most half the carriers in the world, while Samsung is available on pretty much all carriers in the world (Nokia too). So, Apple has at least half the world's mobile subscriptions yet to address for the future! Great position to be in!

 

Therefore, even where Apple shows a "loss" or flatline in "smartphone" marketshare, it is actually holding its own or growing in userbase, because the "smartphone" market is growing in leaps and bounds -- regular mobile phones are being replaced by "smartphones". Having said that, a flat line on Android smartphones on Verizon and ATT is significant, because that is a closed market. We know how many phones they sold, we know how many subscribers they have, we know how many new subscribers they have, we know what phones they could have chosen. ATT and Verizon consistently sell more iPhones than all Android smartphones. End of story. But the whole world is not a closed market -- there are all kinds of issues regarding availability on carriers, there are infrastructure issues, economics, politics, etc. The iPhone has yet to be in a position to even begin to address half the world market. Whole countries aren't really markets we can make good comparisons about either, unless we have more detail -- we don't know if the iPhone can even address all of Germany, Italy, Spain, France, UK, etc. Is the iPhone available on all carriers and equally available as an option to all the citizens of those countries to the degree that an Android phone -- ANY Android phone -- is? I doubt it. So, what good are your charts at telling us what the ATT and Verizon charts can tell us about iPhone vs Android smartphone?

 

Apple is competing against non-consumption. It can go nowhere but up. Apple was not in the phone business, then in 2007 it was. It sells a couple models of a very particular phone: a smartphone for sure (in fact it redefined the category and established the benchmark). Samsung, like Nokia et al has long made all sorts of phones of every description (hundreds of them), and had long-term relationships with all the carriers. It has always sold millions of phones. So now its phones run Android instead of whatever they ran before. So? It is really competing with other similar OEMs (HTC, Nokia, LG, etc.) many of whom it has just about run out of business. The iPhone against "Android" is just not the real issue: EVERYTHING is Android... until a consumer tries an iPhone. But how is Android doing against Samsung where a real comparison can be made (like on a single carrier)? Pretty darn good.

 

In fact, when real life usages are examined (web surfing, buying, online apps and services, various kinds of computing tasks...), the iPhone is represented DISPROPORTIONATELY. Why? Maybe because people actually use the iPhone as a real "smartphone" but don't use their Android upgrade in those ways. Android is put on any and all kinds of phones now. It is the default OS, replacing the previous generation of default mobile OS. This is just what all phone manufacturers have been putting on all their phones, regardless. So, of course the segment of ALL mobile phones represented by "smartphones" was bound to explode. By definition. Yes, that is down to Android. Whoopee! A lot of these billions of Android activations are on basic phones that, yes, can email and surf, if you really want to -- but apparently their owners don't use them for that... because, apparently, they are practically UNunsable for that. Or the owner just picked up whatever phone upgrade the salesman pushed on him, and that happened to run a version of Android (probably a three year-old version, never to be upgraded).

 

Clearly, the iPhone is doing better than any other single phone -- probably better than the next 5 "smartphones" that can really be compared with it in terms of capability and every day real-life use cases that people choose them for. So, as the "smartphone" market inevitably grows to take over all mobile phones and people expect more of their phone, the potential market for iPhone only grows and grows. Android is already in there, and no-one really cares -- sometimes it provides capability and utility to the phone owner, sometimes it doesn't, depends on the phone, the Android version, the person and their expectations, etc. But at least we won't have to differentiate between the "smartphone" market and the rest of the mobile phone market much longer -- it'll just be one huge pile of global mobile subscriptions numbering in the billions, with the potential of one or more for every person on earth. If Apple gets 20% of that against EVERYONE else, whatever the mix of OSs, it will be doing phenomenally well! Jobs was shooting for 1%.

post #114 of 118
From my POV, I had my iPhone back in 2008 (3G launch day in UK). Of course, over the years it became unbearably slow and then the battery eventually packed in late 2012, so I got a good four years out of it.

Problem was, I just could not afford another iPhone so I had to opt for an Android handset going on the cheap (a Sony Ericsson Xperia Play). Absolutely dreadful phone and absolutely dreadful OS. I don't understand why people want Android devices, other than lower overall cost of ownership. Reminds me of Windows 9x days. Even classic Mac OS was better than Win9x, but everyone flooded to the shittier (albeit cheaper) OS.

I really do hope Apple build a 'cheaper' handset. I don't want to use the latest and greatest apps, but I do want a device that I can trust, and I think Google are probably worse than Microsoft were in the nineties, early millennium.
post #115 of 118
Limited information. Sales at AT&T and Verizon are not total sales. The better data would be activations and usage data, which I'm certain both providers have readily on hand.

There is nothing in the piece worth repeating.
post #116 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

I'm sorry, but is the author of this article blind and unable to read his own charts? Looking at the VZW graph, it's clear that iPhone sales peaked in 2012 at 6 million and have been on a decline to 4 million in the most recent quarter.

 

No, but I suggest you may be. I see the valley of the slowest AT&T iPhone quarter this year being higher than the peak of the year before's -- a huge leap which shows tremendous growth. The trend line among the seasonal peaks and among the seasonal lows show continued growth, while the Android data show no cyclical swings and no sign of growth. Get a clue.

post #117 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post

Samsung sold 100 million Galaxy phones since the lines inception (there numbers not mine)

So the numbers are there¿
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabbelen View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

That appears to not be the case.



http://www.tech-thoughts.net/2012/07/global-smartphone-market-share-trends.html

One needs to look more closely at how "smartphone" is defined. And, more to the point, how people are actually using their phones to accomplish a variety of tasks.

What has been happening is that the overall "smartphone" is growing significantly as "dumb" and "feature" phones are replaced with "smartphones". Apparently, according to various analysts, "smartphones" now comprise just north of ALL mobile phones and are rapidly going to subsume all mobile phones as all mobile phones soon become "smartphones" simply because technology and mobile OSs are advancing.

At the same time, one wonders if putting Android on a phone, any phone, makes it a "smartphone" by definition. That certainly seems to be the case. Most of the Android phones produced and sold in the world are not Samsung S3 equivalents, which, as we can see from real sales data, do quite poorly against the iPhone. It is only when the iPhone is compared to ALL "smartphones" from ALL manufacturers, on ALL carriers in ALL the world, that you can come to your conclusion that Apple's poor little iPhone is not doing so hot all on its lonesome. Now, Apple only ever sold "smartphones", so it didn't have a look in at more than half the market of all mobile phones. Plus, Apple is only available on at most half the carriers in the world, while Samsung is available on pretty much all carriers in the world (Nokia too). So, Apple has at least half the world's mobile subscriptions yet to address for the future! Great position to be in!

Therefore, even where Apple shows a "loss" or flatline in "smartphone" marketshare, it is actually holding its own or growing in userbase, because the "smartphone" market is growing in leaps and bounds -- regular mobile phones are being replaced by "smartphones". Having said that, a flat line on Android smartphones on Verizon and ATT is significant, because that is a closed market. We know how many phones they sold, we know how many subscribers they have, we know how many new subscribers they have, we know what phones they could have chosen. ATT and Verizon consistently sell more iPhones than all Android smartphones. End of story. But the whole world is not a closed market -- there are all kinds of issues regarding availability on carriers, there are infrastructure issues, economics, politics, etc. The iPhone has yet to be in a position to even begin to address half the world market. Whole countries aren't really markets we can make good comparisons about either, unless we have more detail -- we don't know if the iPhone can even address all of Germany, Italy, Spain, France, UK, etc. Is the iPhone available on all carriers and equally available as an option to all the citizens of those countries to the degree that an Android phone -- ANY Android phone -- is? I doubt it. So, what good are your charts at telling us what the ATT and Verizon charts can tell us about iPhone vs Android smartphone?

Apple is competing against non-consumption. It can go nowhere but up. Apple was not in the phone business, then in 2007 it was. It sells a couple models of a very particular phone: a smartphone for sure (in fact it redefined the category and established the benchmark). Samsung, like Nokia et al has long made all sorts of phones of every description (hundreds of them), and had long-term relationships with all the carriers. It has always sold millions of phones. So now its phones run Android instead of whatever they ran before. So? It is really competing with other similar OEMs (HTC, Nokia, LG, etc.) many of whom it has just about run out of business. The iPhone against "Android" is just not the real issue: EVERYTHING is Android... until a consumer tries an iPhone. But how is Android doing against Samsung where a real comparison can be made (like on a single carrier)? Pretty darn good.

In fact, when real life usages are examined (web surfing, buying, online apps and services, various kinds of computing tasks...), the iPhone is represented DISPROPORTIONATELY. Why? Maybe because people actually use the iPhone as a real "smartphone" but don't use their Android upgrade in those ways. Android is put on any and all kinds of phones now. It is the default OS, replacing the previous generation of default mobile OS. This is just what all phone manufacturers have been putting on all their phones, regardless. So, of course the segment of ALL mobile phones represented by "smartphones" was bound to explode. By definition. Yes, that is down to Android. Whoopee! A lot of these billions of Android activations are on basic phones that, yes, can email and surf, if you really want to -- but apparently their owners don't use them for that... because, apparently, they are practically UNunsable for that. Or the owner just picked up whatever phone upgrade the salesman pushed on him, and that happened to run a version of Android (probably a three year-old version, never to be upgraded).

Clearly, the iPhone is doing better than any other single phone -- probably better than the next 5 "smartphones" that can really be compared with it in terms of capability and every day real-life use cases that people choose them for. So, as the "smartphone" market inevitably grows to take over all mobile phones and people expect more of their phone, the potential market for iPhone only grows and grows. Android is already in there, and no-one really cares -- sometimes it provides capability and utility to the phone owner, sometimes it doesn't, depends on the phone, the Android version, the person and their expectations, etc. But at least we won't have to differentiate between the "smartphone" market and the rest of the mobile phone market much longer -- it'll just be one huge pile of global mobile subscriptions numbering in the billions, with the potential of one or more for every person on earth. If Apple gets 20% of that against EVERYONE else, whatever the mix of OSs, it will be doing phenomenally well! Jobs was shooting for 1%.

As usual, great post. Thanks for writing it up.
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post #118 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post


You are distorting the figures a bit...

 

Which was why I used "around".

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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  • Google's Android has flatlined in the U.S. as Apple's iPhone steals all growth
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