or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple reveals it keeps anonymized Siri data for up to 2 years
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple reveals it keeps anonymized Siri data for up to 2 years

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
Data collected by Apple to improve its voice-driven Siri service is anonymized and kept on the company's servers for up to two years before it is discarded.

The disclosure was made by Apple to Wired after privacy advocates called on the company to reveal exactly what information it knows and keeps about users. Apple spokeswoman Trudy Muller said the anonymized data is collected solely to improve the service, and that the company takes customer privacy very seriously.



Much of the work for Siri is done remotely, which is why the personal assistant software available on iPhone, iPad and iPod touch requires a data connection to operate.

Voice clips stored by Apple are categorized by random numbers to represent the user who recorded it. The number is not associated with an Apple ID, email address, or anything else that could be easily personally identifiable.

After six months, the random number is no longer associated with the saved clip, but the audio file may be saved for up to two years in total for what Wired said are "testing and product improvement purposes."

However, if a user turns off Siri on their device, their randomized identifier is deleted, along with any data associated with it.

The fact that Siri data must be sent to Apple before it can provide results has been a concern for security advocates, as well as some companies. For example, last year it was revealed that security-conscious IBM barred the use of Siri on its corporate networks, out of concern that sensitive information could leak.
post #2 of 56
Wasn't there a thing a few years ago, where Google kept all their search queries associated with an anonymous id, and they released a database to a university researcher, and she was able to identify people and contact them just by going through all the the queries associated with a particular id?

Sometimes just the fact of linking things together has a de-anonymising effect.
post #3 of 56
This isn't unexpected. However, I do wish Apple would use something like the Harvard Sentences or some other derivation so that you can train Siri to know how you speak so it can tie what you say to various phonemes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

However, if a user turns off Siri on their device, their randomized identifier is deleted, along with any data associated with it.

I wonder if this is accurate as stated. I wouldn't think the data associated with it is deleted, but rather just the identifier that ties it to that device. From a user's perspective it's gone, but I would think it's still on Apple's servers.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #4 of 56
If you're worried about it, don't use it.
post #5 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Wasn't there a thing a few years ago, where Google kept all their search queries associated with an anonymous id, and they released a database to a university researcher, and she was able to identify people and contact them just by going through all the the queries associated with a particular id?

Sometimes just the fact of linking things together has a de-anonymising effect.

Yeah, I do recall that now. Hopefully Apple's service is more anonymous, but since we're talking bits of speech it's unless to get looked over at some point by the public or sold.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #6 of 56
I'm not sure how this is much of a shock: we already knew it was a cloud service, and Apple's terms already stated that info was stored. The main comfort for me: unlike SOME companies I could name, Apple doesn't make essentially all its profit by selling such "anonymized" personal info! Apple makes its profit by making its users happy, and selling the Siri data would not achieve that!

As for Google and DE-anonymizing... I am NEVER logged into Google. I use DoNotTrack. I use the Google opt-out extension. I block third-party cookies. Yet when I searched Google for specific car models last week, I almost immediately received spam about those same cars! Now, I don't think Google turned around and directly sold my info... but they are part of the chain, which is not anonymous at all! Clearly third parties have profiles on me including private email addresses. I don't think Siri plays any part in that kind of personal profile-building.

(This is all the more puzzling because I thought Google said they'd stop sharing search terms in their referrals. Really not sure how this kind of thing happens. Something similar happened to my friend with a medical condition: she did some searches on Google, and shortly afterward, entirely unrelated sites were showing relevant banner ads! She too is never logged into Google.)

Bottom line... privacy worries me. Siri doesn't.
Edited by nagromme - 4/19/13 at 8:52am
post #7 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I'm not sure how this is much of a shock: we already knew it was a cloud service, and Apple's terms already stated that info was stored. The main comfort for me: unlike SOME companies I could name, Apple doesn't make essentially all its profit by selling such "anonymized" personal info! Apple makes its profit by making its users happy, and selling the Siri data would not achieve that!

Which companies are selling that "anonymized" personal info? I don't recall you mentioning their names before.

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #8 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

(This is all the more puzzling because I thought Google said they'd stop sharing search terms in their referrals. . . .)

 

Just because I say I'm pretty, doesn't make it so. :)

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

Reply

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

Reply
post #9 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Which companies are selling that "anonymized" personal info? I don't recall you mentioning their names before.

 

I don't think Google sells anonymized data. That would likely undermine its business model.  It certainly uses the data to drive up the price it charges to deliver people supposedly personalized ads. In my view, it fails at delivering those ads effectively both annoying me and robbing advertisers who think Google is sending ads to the right people. I also think Google is poor at protecting users' data. I have had multiple Gmail accounts from friends, family, and myself hacked. That raises the question, can parties get their hands on the data without Google's permission.  Google certainly isn't the only company that fails regarding protecting data, but I haven't had any issues with Apple yet. 

 

However, there are companies like Verizon, On Star, and Mint that sells anonymized data. 

post #10 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I'm not sure how this is much of a shock: we already knew it was a cloud service, and Apple's terms already stated that info was stored. The main comfort for me: unlike SOME companies I could name, Apple doesn't make essentially all its profit by selling such "anonymized" personal info! Apple makes its profit by making its users happy, and selling the Siri data would not achieve that!

As for Google and DE-anonymizing... I am NEVER logged into Google. I use DoNotTrack. I use the Google opt-out extension. I block third-party cookies. Yet when I searched Google for specific car models last week, I almost immediately received spam about those same cars! Now, I don't think Google turned around and directly sold my info... but they are part of the chain, which is not anonymous at all! Clearly third parties have profiles on me including private email addresses. I don't think Siri plays any part in that kind of personal profile-building.

(This is all the more puzzling because I thought Google said they'd stop sharing search terms in their referrals. Really not sure how this kind of thing happens. Something similar happened to my friend with a medical condition: she did some searches on Google, and shortly afterward, entirely unrelated sites were showing relevant banner ads! She too is never logged into Google.)

Bottom line... privacy worries me. Siri doesn't.

If you weren't logged into Google and using Do Not Track then it's sounds like some company other than Google was responsible for the targeted ads you saw. Wouldn't you agree?

 

Are you an ATT subscriber for your iPhone? Are you familiar with ATT Adworks? Perhaps you should be.

http://www.adworks.att.com/

 

Or maybe you're with Sprint. Did you know they track the websites you visit on your mobile device too as well as log the apps you use to help third-parties in targeting ads just for you?

 

How about Verizon? Yup they do it too. In fact they changed their privacy policy in late 2011 to allow them to sell your "profile" outright to third-parties. Supposedly ATT, Sprint and T-Mo only assist with targeted ad placement and don't actually hand over your data.

 

While Google has said they'll respect Safari users Do Not Track requests, prompted by their "accidental"1hmm.gif bypassing caught a few months back, there's a lot of ad providers that have made no such commitment. 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/14/technology/do-not-track-movement-is-drawing-advertisers-fire.html?_r=0

http://money.cnn.com/2011/11/01/technology/verizon_att_sprint_tmobile_privacy/index.htm

 

If you REALLY want to get a slap in the face waking you up to your myth of privacy, here's a quick and easy read.

http://www.propublica.org/article/everything-we-know-about-what-data-brokers-know-about-you


Edited by Gatorguy - 4/19/13 at 10:30am
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #11 of 56

Cue clueless senators calling for Apple to limit this data to 7 days, drastically reducing Siri's quality improvements. Just like with location data.

[this account has been abandoned]

Reply

[this account has been abandoned]

Reply
post #12 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

 

However, there are companies like Verizon, On Star, and Mint that sells anonymized data. 

Yes sir they do and they're not alone. IIRC every major credit reporting agency has been caught selling personally identifiable financial information to 3rd party marketers. There's several FTC settlements made with them over the years.

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #13 of 56

No shit...?!    How'd people think it worked?

 

Sir is a learning system.  You thought the way it learned, was by "forgetting?

post #14 of 56

Yes, it's obviously google's fault here... A giant company (with lots of money) is obviously willfully violating the law.  Doing something that computer savvy people can easily track and determine who's to blame.  I mean, spam is worth a lot of money, and it's not like the lawyers would launch a huge class action law suit against google for violating federal law.  Plus, no one from these companies would ever think that they're violating CANSPAM (or whatever law it is), and blow a whistle on google.  Obviously they have their people locked down.\

 

Or maybe, your system has been compromised by adware/spyware.  Something on your system knows your email address, and then knows what you search for... This makes FAR more sense to me.  There are tons of websites that also track your data.  I'm assuming when you were searching for cars you also clicked on links, and didn't just read google's results.  Maybe someone had a cookie on your system storing your email address, or an identifier linked to it, and then sent it.  There are tons of ways companies can collect this, but I suppose this is appleinsider, where blaming google is the easy way out.

 

Phil

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I'm not sure how this is much of a shock: we already knew it was a cloud service, and Apple's terms already stated that info was stored. The main comfort for me: unlike SOME companies I could name, Apple doesn't make essentially all its profit by selling such "anonymized" personal info! Apple makes its profit by making its users happy, and selling the Siri data would not achieve that!

As for Google and DE-anonymizing... I am NEVER logged into Google. I use DoNotTrack. I use the Google opt-out extension. I block third-party cookies. Yet when I searched Google for specific car models last week, I almost immediately received spam about those same cars! Now, I don't think Google turned around and directly sold my info... but they are part of the chain, which is not anonymous at all! Clearly third parties have profiles on me including private email addresses. I don't think Siri plays any part in that kind of personal profile-building.

(This is all the more puzzling because I thought Google said they'd stop sharing search terms in their referrals. Really not sure how this kind of thing happens. Something similar happened to my friend with a medical condition: she did some searches on Google, and shortly afterward, entirely unrelated sites were showing relevant banner ads! She too is never logged into Google.)

Bottom line... privacy worries me. Siri doesn't.
post #15 of 56
Worried about technology? Then don't use it.
I love it and use it.
post #16 of 56

@ascii and others talking about Google releasing searches.

 

I believe you are thinking of the AOL 2006 data release http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AOL_search_data_leak through which New York Times successfully discovered the identity of several searchers, most notably Thelma Arnold.

post #17 of 56
Privacy is concerning. Sites like facebook often know more about you than you do. And there isn't a ton of net benefit except to facebook. Inline ads on your phone are a scourge.

But Siri's anonymized data is what will make Siri useful and valuable for YOU the more you use it, and an annoying gimmick if politicians successfully limit the ability for Apple to use voice recordings to improve quality.

Tell your politicians! Send them emails!
post #18 of 56
Neither Apple nor Google is going to sell our voice snippets, and both undoubtedly have very few people with access to the data and the relationship key.  (Google's voice recognition policy specifically states this.)
 
Google gives the user full control.  On an Android device, go to Settings - Language & Input - Voice Search - Personalized Recognition, and you can turn it on or off.
 

 

You can also go to your Google Dashboard (https://www.google.com/dashboard/and instantly anonymize all your previous voice recordings, something which I decided not to do, since I _like_ how well Google deciphers my voice.
 

 

 

Does Apple have any kind of user dashboard, one place where we can go to see at least some of what info they have stored, and/or control it?


Edited by KDarling - 4/19/13 at 11:09am
post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by emcomments View Post

@ascii and others talking about Google releasing searches.

 

I believe you are thinking of the AOL 2006 data release http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AOL_search_data_leak through which New York Times successfully discovered the identity of several searchers, most notably Thelma Arnold.

There's also this more recent study:

 

 

While in the past, mobility traces were only available to mobile phone carriers, the advent of smartphones and other means of data collection has made these broadly available. For example, Apple® recently updated its privacy policy to allow sharing the spatio-temporal location of their users with “partners and licensees”21. 65.5B geo-tagged payments are made per year in the US22while Skyhook wireless is resolving 400 M user's WiFi location every day23. Furthermore, it is estimated that a third of the 25B copies of applications available on Apple's App StoreSM access a user's geographic location2425, and that the geo-location of ~50% of all iOS and Android traffic is available to ad networks26. All these are fuelling the ubiquity of simply anonymized mobility datasets and are giving room to privacy concerns.

A simply anonymized dataset does not contain name, home address, phone number or other obvious identifier. Yet, if individual's patterns are unique enough, outside information can be used to link the data back to an individual. For instance, in one study, a medical database was successfully combined with a voters list to extract the health record of the governor of Massachusetts27. In another, mobile phone data have been re-identified using users' top locations28. Finally, part of the Netflix challenge dataset was re-identified using outside information from The Internet Movie Database29.

http://www.nature.com/srep/2013/130325/srep01376/full/srep01376.html

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #20 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

If you're worried about it, don't use it.

Yeah, if you don't want Siri to hear certain things, you shouldn't be saying them.

I watch Eric Schmidt while he sleeps. If he doesn't like it, maybe he shouldn't be doing it.

I don't particularly mind Google or Apple using anonymous data as long as they are transparent about the level of anonymity, amount of data and data retention period. Siri hasn't even been with Apple for 2 years so I wonder if the result quality will start to be change for some people around the end of the year when they start removing some data.
post #21 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Neither Apple nor Google is going to sell our voice snippets, and both undoubtedly have very few people with access to the data and the relationship key.  (Google's voice recognition policy specifically states this.)
 
Google gives the user full control.  On an Android device, go to Settings - Language & Input - Voice Search - Personalized Recognition, and you can turn it on or off.
 

 

You can also go to your Google Dashboard (https://www.google.com/dashboard/and instantly anonymize all your previous voice recordings, something which I decided not to do, since I _like_ how well Google deciphers my voice.
 

 

 

Does Apple have any kind of user dashboard, one place where we can go to see at least some of what info they have stored, and/or control it?

 

 

Not that I am aware of, but as you mentioned, Google's model by default does not dissociate your voice. Like with all its services, it links your voice to your profile. Apple by default dissociates your voice by assigning you an anonymous identifier number. After 6 months it gets rid of even that. Apple's policy seems superior from a pure privacy standpoint.

post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

 

 

Not that I am aware of, but as you mentioned, Google's model by default does not dissociate your voice. Like with all its services, it links your voice to your profile. Apple by default dissociates your voice by assigning you an anonymous identifier number. After 6 months it gets rid of even that. Apple's policy seems superior from a pure privacy standpoint.

 

There's still something linking that number with you. Google probably uses some sort of generated key to store voice clips too. Perhaps it's whatever key your Google account already has but it really doesn't matter. Honestly, there's really no difference between how these 2 companies are storing the data except that as someone pointed out, Google gives you an explicit way to actually completely sever that link.

post #23 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Not that I am aware of, but as you mentioned, Google's model by default does not dissociate your voice. Like with all its services, it links your voice to your profile. Apple by default dissociates your voice by assigning you an anonymous identifier number. After 6 months it gets rid of even that. Apple's policy seems superior from a pure privacy standpoint.

 

Google, like Apple, uses a identifier key to associate voice samples with a person, that only they know.   However, you're right, it's not random like the Apple one.

 

Quote:

"Normally, all saved speech samples remain anonymous. In other words, Google stores millions of voice recordings with no way of telling who was speaking. When you sign up for personalized speech recognition, Google creates an electronic key that links your speech samples with your Google Account. Google uses this key to access voice samples and improve recognition of your speaking voice."

 

- Google Voice Recognition Policy

 

Now, obviously if you want personalized voice recognition that works best and automatically across ALL your devices, the key will have to be linked to the same account.  

 

Moreover, if an Android user buys another device (new or replacement), the personalized voice recognition carries over automatically. Sounds like Apple cannot do that.  

 

I agree the Google method is not as secure in a strict sense, but the advantages are worth the trade-off.  Plus I'm not worried, since only Google stores the voice and key.  And again, if I don't like that, I can uncheck the personalized recognition and/or wipe out the association anytime I wish.  I get to choose.


Edited by KDarling - 4/19/13 at 12:38pm
post #24 of 56
I've worked in software development for the better part of the last two decades. Anonymizing data is a lot of work. Nobody does it unless they really have to.

You know that software that runs your doctor's office? What do you think happens when the office manager starts seeing weird stuff? Tech support asks for a copy of the data so they can try to figure out what's wrong. The data gets passed to developers and testers who treat it like gold.

HIPPA rules dictate that all customer data must be either destroyed or anonymized, but it rarely happens because real data filled with empty "required" fields, duplicate IDs and other conditions that shouldn't exist is the holy grail of software development.
post #25 of 56
And what about Samsung etc. don't they have a voice system that works they same way. How long do they keep the data

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

And what about Samsung etc. don't they have a voice system that works they same way. How long do they keep the data

 

Samsung's "S-Voice" is powered by VLingo, which uses Nuance voice recognition servers.

 

It's basically a reskinned version of "Dragon Mobile Assistant", which is available for Android or iOS.

 

You'd have to check with Nuance to see what their personalization (if any) and privacy policies are.

post #27 of 56

A friend and I were talking about gardening which led to reminiscing the old days of growing pot which was pretty funny with all the odd lingo. Then the question came up of how many grams were in a lid? He asked Siri and she actually came back with: "This might answer your question" Convert 1 lid to grams = 28.35g. She also knows how many pounds are in a "key" 2.205.

 

I'm glad he used his phone and not mine. I don't want that sort of stuff saved in my profile.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #28 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by widmark View Post

Privacy is concerning. Sites like facebook often know more about you than you do. And there isn't a ton of net benefit except to facebook. Inline ads on your phone are a scourge.

 

 

?? why facebook knows more about me than I do?  Aren't we always suppose to use fake names on the web?  Yes, facebook knows about this fictitious "person" a lot.  But everything was just made up.  

post #29 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Does Apple have any kind of user dashboard, one place where we can go to see at least some of what info they have stored, and/or control it?

 

Buy an iPhone and find out.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #30 of 56
Originally Posted by ipen View Post

?? why facebook knows more about me than I do?  Aren't we always suppose to use fake names on the web?  Yes, facebook knows about this fictitious "person" a lot.  But everything was just made up.  

 

If you think simply creating an account under a false name doesn't give Facebook lots of information about you, then you are sadly selling them short.  Unless you use extreme (tinfoil level, which isn't always a bad thing) care and diligence, Facebook, Google and other personal profile-generating sites can make very good guesses about who you are, no matter what fake FB name you use.

 

Think about it.  Do you have any "real" friends on this fake account?  Your social graph exists across several web properties, it's not like they can't piece that stuff together.  If you don't have any real friends on the fake account, then why bother with it?

 

Also, if you access Facebook (using your fake account) from your home or office using the same computer that you access other "real" accounts with, then there is an easy path to put those two pieces of data together.  Happens all the time.  If you really, truly, don't want FB (or Google, etc.) from tracking everything you do online, you need to block their cookies, block their widgets, block their ads and probably even don't connect via the same IP address from which you connect to other services that do business with them.

 

The odds are that FB has a very good idea that your account is "fake", but they also have vested interest in keeping huge #s of accounts active, so they don't shut them all down, only where something suspicious is happening.

No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
post #31 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Buy an iPhone and find out.

 

If you don't know the answer, why post?

 

In all my time owning, using and programming iOS devices, I've never run across an Apple dashboard site, so I was curious if anyone knew of one.

 

(There is a page for controlling ad id numbers for people with older versions of iOS, but that's all it does.)

post #32 of 56
Bullshit.

The number is not associated with an Apple ID, email address, or anything else that could be easily personally identifiable.

However, if a user turns off Siri on their device, their randomized identifier is deleted, along with any data associated with it
, since the device is not easily personnaly identifiable because it definitely doesn't have a UID, totally not.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

A simply anonymized dataset does not contain name, home address, phone number or other obvious identifier. Yet, if individual's patterns are unique enough, outside information can be used to link the data back to an individual. 

 

This is how theorists have been able to track Elvis around Vegas from one Denny's restaurant to another late at night. 

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #34 of 56
"However, if a user turns off Siri on their device, their randomized identifier is deleted, along with any data associated with it."

How can Apple delete my voice clips if they are not connect to my account ?
I have no problem with Apple storing it, but that remark i don't understand.
post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by copeland View Post

"However, if a user turns off Siri on their device, their randomized identifier is deleted, along with any data associated with it."

How can Apple delete my voice clips if they are not connect to my account ?
I have no problem with Apple storing it, but that remark i don't understand.

 

I'll try to clarify this by using a simple example and the comparable easy to understand SQL language.

 

1. You have messages saved in a table with a direct reference to the user. In this case you would get the result by typing this:

 

select * from table messages where user like 'John Dow'

 

2. The more common way is to build references by UID's (faster and more functional because you can use multiple references). 

 

In this case there might be a table called user with the row ID = 12, User='John Dow'. This ID is then stored in the messages table and you can get the personalized messages through:

 

select * from table messages where user.ID = 12

 

When you delete the entires for the user-ID, but the user keeps this value on his device the messages are partially anonymized. The user can build the reference but not someone else, not knowing the ID.

 

Anonymization can be prepared and made stronger by using random UIDs, because normal IDs can be guessed. The strongest way is to create them independently on your device instead on a central server. I do this often for e.g. one time transactions or passwords.

Those device specific UIDs might look like 'EFXwjTV86LcT'.

 

The point here is that you can obtain the same functionality for referencing the user's messages by

 

select * from table messages where ID like 'EFXwjTV86LcT'

 

This query can only be invoked by the device, because the server doesn't know who is related to the ID. You can also delete all messages related to this ID.

 

This is what Siri does when you disable it.

 

But we are still at a point where your messages are only strongly, but not fully anonymized.

The reason is that your messages might contain contentual references to you like spoken words.

 

In order to learn from those they have to be analyzed. The system might e.g. link your pronounciation of 'Eiffel Tower' to the correct recognition for giving the directions.

When this pattern get's linked to the target and command, but the additional information get's wiped your messages are fully anonymized.

 

I think what's clear is that Apple chose the technical harder way for best possible privacy with Siri.

 

Keeping the full messages including the references to the user would be much simpler and also would allow to provide functionality you can only offer when you know all about the user.

 

Please let me know if this is too technical. I'll try to clarify it further.

post #36 of 56
Great! So all the times I told Siri to open her f@#!ing ears, are stored for 2 years. Heh
post #37 of 56
No matter what you do, there is no such thing as privacy anymore. Unless you are truly off the grid
post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by btracy713 View Post

Great! So all the times I told Siri to open her f@#!ing ears, are stored for 2 years. Heh

The fact that it still doesn't recognize it correctly point's to the fact that it's not considered to be helpful improve the service.

As I explained also this BS isn't stored in your profile.

post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by btracy713 View Post

No matter what you do, there is no such thing as privacy anymore. Unless you are truly off the grid

Privacy and freedom of speech are part of the constitutional rights in most democratic states.

 

Maybe I'm off the grid, but I judge keeping it relevant to be worth the effort. It's possible to protect it without significantly decreasing functionality and user experience on computing devices.

post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by DominoXML View Post

 

But we are still at a point where your messages are only strongly, but not fully anonymized.

The reason is that your messages might contain contentual references to you like spoken words.

 

Your explanation is technically sound and very clear, but it clearly says what we also say: data is NOT fully anonymized, and it's unclear how it could ever be, since it's not random words, but series of words forming sentences useful to you, in particular.

 

I like Dragon, and I'd rather have such an offline Siri...

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple reveals it keeps anonymized Siri data for up to 2 years