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Apple's updated Campus 2 plans add pedestrian walkways and bicycle paths

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Apple recently submitted a fresh set of plans for its second Cupertino, Calif., campus, adding a few enhancements to the original proposal, including the addition of bicycle pathways and a slightly revised timeline.

Campus 2


Published by the city of Cupertino, Apple's Submittal 6 comes five months after the company filed its last set of plans, which itself outlined a number of changes from the original Campus 2 submission.

The newest plans show a higher level of detail regarding Apple's vision for its huge "spaceship" campus, including extended bike paths and private roads circling the grounds. A set of new visualizations are highlighted in the proposal, which show internal and perimeter pedestrian walkways.

Also included with the submission is a set of renderings for a bike path that will be added to the surface streets surrounding the campus, with specifications for routing and road markings.

Among the changes from prior submissions are an additional 240 parking spaces in two areas, one set near the giant circular building and another in a nearby area. In all, there will be approximately 10,980 parking spaces available, spread across underground and above-grade lots.

Campus 2


Slated for completion in 2016, the undertaking has seen setbacks, including budget overruns and delays. In the latest Submittal 6, for example, the so-called "Tantau" development area located in one corner of the massive block has been pushed into construction Phase 2. The site's 2.8 million-square-foot, four story main building is projected to be part of the Phase 1 build.

In addition to the gigantic Campus 2 in Cupertino, Apple is also expanding its Austin, Tex., campus with a $304 million upgrade, which will serve as the company's new "Americas Operations Center."

post #2 of 27

Ooh.

I love patting bicycles.

post #3 of 27
Improved and closer to completion, I enjoy sidewalks and paths.
post #4 of 27

What an epic fucking building. Only Apple has the audacity and commitment to pull something like this off. 

post #5 of 27

The spaceship looked better in white :|

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post #6 of 27
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Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

What an epic fucking building. Only Apple has the audacity and commitment to pull something like this off. 

Indeed, And WS fails to see this as a new product on its own. Not made for consumer products mind you, but I presume they are building a new R&D facility outfitted with 'the latest' which will in turn help the development of new products. I'm guessing Campus 2 is part of the reason for a product slowdown. Of course they're outsourcing, but together with the rollout of more Data Centers it will take up some of their time otherwise dedicated to their product line.
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post #7 of 27
It's a bit weird that bike lanes weren't an integral part of the original design, but great they've been added. Really, all modern neighborhoods, cities, campuses, whatever should be designed with bikes/pedestrians/public transit as core principles and not tacked on in revisions. Proper implementation usually requires them as core design principles.

A complex this size should have a bike-share program for all employees that's just hop-on/hop-off and a ban on all gas-powered vehicles during business hours (solar-charged electric vehicles for people who can't bike) - just make it a totally green/healthy campus. Cupertino has a climate that makes it possible to bike year-round and the whole area will be landscaped flat too.
post #8 of 27
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Originally Posted by spacerays View Post

The spaceship looked better in white :|

By the time it's done, black will be the new black again. Fashion will have come full circle...get it? Circle?

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post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

What an epic fucking building. Only Apple has the audacity and commitment to pull something like this off. 

If it rotated to generate its own gravity, it would be perfect for a Kubrick movie.

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post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

It's a bit weird that bike lanes weren't an integral part of the original design, but great they've been added. Really, all modern neighborhoods, cities, campuses, whatever should be designed with bikes/pedestrians/public transit as core principles and not tacked on in revisions. Proper implementation usually requires them as core design principles.

I don't think this is the responsibility of Apple, rather the City of Cupertino. On 8/24/2011 the City announced the EIR Scoping Meeting, scheduled for 9/8/2011 and only after the plans were made known to the City they were able to draw up the plans for the infrastructure.

http://www.cupertino.org/index.aspx?page=1107
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post #11 of 27
The City of Cupertino needs to rethink its bicycle infrastructure designs. The Dutch model is much better thought out, much safer than what is shown above and is proven to work wonderfully well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlApbxLz6pA
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

It's a bit weird that bike lanes weren't an integral part of the original design, but great they've been added. Really, all modern neighborhoods, cities, campuses, whatever should be designed with bikes/pedestrians/public transit as core principles and not tacked on in revisions. Proper implementation usually requires them as core design principles.

A complex this size should have a bike-share program for all employees that's just hop-on/hop-off and a ban on all gas-powered vehicles during business hours (solar-charged electric vehicles for people who can't bike) - just make it a totally green/healthy campus. Cupertino has a climate that makes it possible to bike year-round and the whole area will be landscaped flat too.

No, really, they shouldn't.  Modern cities (and "whatevers") should be designed to accommodate the people who live and work in them on a case-by-case basis, not a bunch of politically leftist-minded religious zealots.  Environmentalism is the new Catholic, pontiff, we get it.  

I was going to just pass until the part about banning all gas-powered vehicles during business hours, at which point I realized if somebody does not refute this  lunacy then the silence might be mistaken for assent.  

Cupertino also has a climate that makes it possible to drive (the sports car one's stock options were able to purchase) year-round with the top down and the stereo on, which makes for a much more pleasant environment by which to pass a bunch of fart-huffing bicyclists on your way to work...

I'll applaud the pedal-paths though, since they get the biker-toots out of the traffic lanes where they should never have been in the first place.

post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by reinthal View Post

The City of Cupertino needs to rethink its bicycle infrastructure designs. The Dutch model is much better thought out, much safer than what is shown above and is proven to work wonderfully well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlApbxLz6pA

 

I seriously can't tell if you're joking....

post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by echosonic View Post

I seriously can't tell if you're joking....

Well, the Netherlands is the number one country regarding cyclists per capita. Due to the flat area, short distances and high density, cycling is immense popular there. So you might consider that the Dutch do have extensive experience and research on the safety of cyclist in traffic.
Edited by cykz - 4/25/13 at 12:12pm
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by spacerays View Post

The spaceship looked better in white :|


If you read the plans, it calls for 8 megawatts of solar panels on both the roof and parking structures.  While white may look "nicer", solar panels don't come in that color, and I suspect Steve Jobs would let that little technicality slide if it meant being more self-sustaining.

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by spacerays View Post

The spaceship looked better in white :|

You can't have white photovoltaics, and that's the roof, mostly you won't see the roof.
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post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Indeed, And WS fails to see this as a new product on its own. Not made for consumer products mind you, but I presume they are building a new R&D facility outfitted with 'the latest' which will in turn help the development of new products. I'm guessing Campus 2 is part of the reason for a product slowdown. Of course they're outsourcing, but together with the rollout of more Data Centers it will take up some of their time otherwise dedicated to their product line.

Who said there's a product slow down? Lack of events does not equate to product slow down.
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post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by reinthal View Post

The City of Cupertino needs to rethink its bicycle infrastructure designs. The Dutch model is much better thought out, much safer than what is shown above and is proven to work wonderfully well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlApbxLz6pA

Ireland seems to use the Dutch model so.
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post #19 of 27
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Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


If you read the plans, it calls for 8 megawatts of solar panels on both the roof and parking structures.  While white may look "nicer", solar panels don't come in that color, and I suspect Steve Jobs would let that little technicality slide if it meant being more self-sustaining.

Black looks better. And the roof will be out of view.
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post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


I don't think this is the responsibility of Apple, rather the City of Cupertino. On 8/24/2011 the City announced the EIR Scoping Meeting, scheduled for 9/8/2011 and only after the plans were made known to the City they were able to draw up the plans for the infrastructure.

http://www.cupertino.org/index.aspx?page=1107

This link is cool

post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by reinthal View Post

The City of Cupertino needs to rethink its bicycle infrastructure designs. The Dutch model is much better thought out, much safer than what is shown above and is proven to work wonderfully well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlApbxLz6pA

1. Indeed, less casualties since they build it like this. Still, the cyclists need to point where they're going otherwise the car driver gets pissed if they both turn right.

2. great video, good find.
Quote:
Originally Posted by echosonic View Post

I seriously can't tell if you're joking....

I seriously do not understand your questioning...
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post #22 of 27
As a software developer, it doesn't look like somewhere I would like to work. I like big cities and would prefer to work for a company with an office right in the hustle and bustle of a metropolis. However only the Apple leadership knows what their people want and culture demands.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

As a software developer, it doesn't look like somewhere I would like to work. I like big cities and would prefer to work for a company with an office right in the hustle and bustle of a metropolis. However only the Apple leadership knows what their people want and culture demands.

True, too bad Silicon Valley has been such a dud in that area. If they'd only set up in downtown Detroit they'd have been successful!

post #24 of 27
Unless I'm misinterpreting the document, Apple is "recommending" the addition of bike baths on the public streets surrounding the campus, which means they expect the city to build them, not that they're willing to build them or even fund them.

Also, the document says the current campus has 4844 employees with a capacity of 8400. I thought they were "stuffed to the gills" at the current campus and were leasing tons of outside space.

They also talk about "net new employees" and "net new capacity" after the new building is constructed which implies that they're not keeping the old campus, even though I had thought they had previously indicated they were keeping the old campus, but they would give up leased space outside of the old campus.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by echosonic View Post

No, really, they shouldn't.  Modern cities (and "whatevers") should be designed to accommodate the people who live and work in them on a case-by-case basis, not a bunch of politically leftist-minded religious zealots.  Environmentalism is the new Catholic, pontiff, we get it.  

I was going to just pass until the part about banning all gas-powered vehicles during business hours, at which point I realized if somebody does not refute this  lunacy then the silence might be mistaken for assent.  

Cupertino also has a climate that makes it possible to drive (the sports car one's stock options were able to purchase) year-round with the top down and the stereo on, which makes for a much more pleasant environment by which to pass a bunch of fart-huffing bicyclists on your way to work...

I'll applaud the pedal-paths though, since they get the biker-toots out of the traffic lanes where they should never have been in the first place.

 

Yes, so instead we should become Beijing, where the air is so bad, people don't go outside anymore and those that do wear face masks, and where many international schools are basically inside domes with massive air filtration systems so that the kids can survive without having severe bronchial problems before age 10.

 

Why do car people always think that the car should take priority over pedestrians and bicyclists?    Especially on new roads and reconstructed roads, there is absolutely no reason why both cars and bicycles can't be accommodated.   Many European cities do this quite well.     I've been in parts of Amsterdam which go beyond what's shown in that animated video that was posted -- where I was (in some coastal resort town), the bike paths along the main road was completely separated from the road itself.    That probably wouldn't work in a dense city in downtown streets with skyscrapers, but it can work on major roads in California.  In Munich, bicycles have a protected lane with their own traffic lights.

 

My personal belief is that any time a new highway is constructed, there should be light rail or other public transportation built right down the middle and protected bike lines along the sides.    The incremental costs to build this (aside from the operational costs of running a public transportation system) are actually not that major.     Our current path, with people in many places experiencing two hour delays to get over a bridge or through a tunnel is simply not sustainable.   And that's aside from the pollution issues.   It would be ridiculous even if all those people were in natural gas or hydrogen powered cars. 

 

There's no reason why anyone living within 5 miles of Apple's offices couldn't commute by bike to work when the weather is good.   Looks to me that they have fewer parking spaces than employees so there's going to have be some car pooling and other alternate means of transportation in any case. 

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

As a software developer, it doesn't look like somewhere I would like to work. I like big cities and would prefer to work for a company with an office right in the hustle and bustle of a metropolis. However only the Apple leadership knows what their people want and culture demands.

 

I prefer the city life too, but the costs of having such a large amount of space in a vibrant downtown core are enormous, which is the main reason why most major tech companies have their headquarters outside of downtown cores.  Plus, to keep a downtown core vibrant, you really need to have things which attract the general public to spend time at (restaurants, bars, unique shops, art galleries, museums, parks, etc).  Head offices and the like are generally what make a downtown core less interesting since the vast majority of the people just commute in to work and then commute out again (leaving it a ghost town during non-working hours).


Edited by auxio - 4/26/13 at 7:46am
 
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post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post

 

I prefer the city life too, but the costs of having such a large amount of space in a vibrant downtown core are enormous, which is the main reason why most major tech companies have their headquarters outside of downtown cores.  Plus, to keep a downtown core vibrant, you really need to have things which attract the general public to spend time at (restaurants, bars, unique shops, art galleries, museums, parks, etc).  Head offices and the like are generally what make a downtown core less interesting since the vast majority of the people just commute in to work and then commute out again (leaving it a ghost town during non-working hours).

Yes, I think you're right, the sheer amount of space needed makes it impractical. But I have worked both for companies with an office in the city, and companies with offices in an industrial park on the outskirts and found the city experience far better. No matter how much expense and effort companies put in to their cafeteria, they can't compete with the food quality, variety, vibrancy and competition of a big city's business or financial district. And it's incredibly convenient to be able to pop out in your lunch hour: just go down the elevator and you're right in the main shopping area, to get chores done. When you go work in an industrial park this is something you instantly miss, because a lot of shopping has to wait until the weekend suddenly.

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