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Windows 8 tablets grab 7% of shipments, Apple's iPad still controls nearly half - Page 2

post #41 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

It's interesting that Android's 9% surge and Surface's 7.4 gains seem to be at iOS's -15% expense. Really wondering what to attribute that to. iPod cemented their lead by iterating so quickly. This doesn't seem to be playing out with iPad in the same way. Surprising to me, frankly.

The market is expanding faster than Apple can produce iPads.
post #42 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

Bogus? Really? How about Palm, HP, Blackberry,etc, all producing and shipping products that they later heavily discounted or wrote off completely. The roadside is littered with products like this.
Just curious which current Android OEM is producing all these tablets that aren't selling (and I'm assuming then returned)? What I want to know is where these analytic firms get their data from. Web usage data shows a completely different story than these estimates. Do any Android OEM's even release shipped or sold information?
post #43 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCProfessor View Post

No offense taken. Yeah I can hit the top left back button, But the button the buttons at the bottom of the Nexus are just bigger, lights up, and seems easier to use.

No offense meant, but are you too stupid or prideful to ever try a Nexus 10 for 5 minutes using Chrome?
No just too deeply vested in Apple products and stocks 1smile.gif It's like a Chevy/Ford or Lakers/Celtics thing, like you, we have chosen our team & like what we know.
post #44 of 129
Android "tablets" include a lot of Kindles. That's where those numbers come from...
post #45 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It includes the Kindle Fire and Barnes and Noble Nook. The Android segment is made up of loads of devices.

Even rarely accurate Samsung shill Digitimes had stats showing Samsung at 3.9% tablet supplier shipments vs Apple at 71.6%. The article was here:

http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20130419VL202.html

but they've since hidden it for members only. Can't imagine why. There's still tablet usage stats that show a similar distribution though:

http://thenextweb.com/gadgets/2013/02/05/chitika-ipad-at-81-tablet-web-share-in-north-america-kindle-fire-grabs-7-7-and-galaxy-tablets-take-3-9/

The ebook readers have quite a large portion of the sales:

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/01/kindle-fire-nabs-33-of-android-tablet-market-nexus-7-just-8/

That may explain lower web usage as they will be bought by people primarily for reading books.

The stats in the article are sales shares too which are only measured in a given quarter, which is why 3 million represents over 7%. Android tablets are starting to pick up the pace as they are selling at little to no profit. It's the only way they're able to sell - if they were within $50 of the price of an iPad, nobody would even give them a second glance. When they are $130 or more cheaper, it's a better option to people who aren't too fussy about the quality and just want something to read a few books on. You can see that even with the vastly lower price, there's still very few people interested in any particular model.
I have another theory. These companies pick some mythical market share number percentages. They then wait for Apple to release their results. They then fill in the blanks for the other OSes. Had Apple sold 30% less iPads, Android would have also sold 30% fewer units.
post #46 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

From my experience here in the San Francisco bay area, that seems to be relatively close to my experience. There has been an uptick in iPads since the mini though.

In Phoenix metro it is closer to 90-95%.
post #47 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Everett Ruess View Post


No just too deeply vested in Apple products and stocks 1smile.gif It's like a Chevy/Ford or Lakers/Celtics thing, like you, we have chosen our team & like what we know.

 

Sometimes pragmatism is a good course.  Corporations rise and fall, make good products and bad, going down with a sinking ship (for instance, holding Apple stock from 700+ back down to 400) doesn't prove anything.  

post #48 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhyde View Post

Android "tablets" include a lot of Kindles. That's where those numbers come from...

As the Kindle doesn't include Google Play it is not an Android tablet, please provide proof to backup your claim
post #49 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Okay honest question. Why would retailers continue to take shipments if the product was not selling? Why would a manufacture continue to put money into a product that wasn't selling? So on some level shipments have to mean something.

The whole idea of a manufacturer is to go into full production of a product; the do not manufacture to order. It then becomes marketing's job to get that mass of merchandise out into the stores. They do that in a number of ways, here's a short list:
1. Offer delayed payment options of up to a year after receiving shipment. Usually more like 90 days.

2. Offer free promotional materials, such as advertising credits, display furniture, and staff training, if the store buys into the whole program.

3. Offer special pricing for the introductory period.

 

The advantage to the manufacturer is that they get the product into the hands of the reseller with an invoice (albeit a delayed payment date). Along with the national advertising program and local store advertising they hope to create a marketing buzz strong enough to empty the stores of their stock and get a strong launch. The last thing they want to do is to take back unsold merchandise. If the sales are slower than desired, the manufacturer may offer an additional discount to the stores to blow the merchandise out in a sale. 

 

Having the merchandise shipped and invoiced allows the manufacturer to show they've moved the product through their channel. However, we may see, in the next quarter that Microsoft had to take invoice charge backs on a ton of Surfaces, and this will show against profits. Hopefully, by then most people won't see it as a failure of the Surface tablets close to a year ago.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #50 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


As the Kindle doesn't include Google Play it is not an Android tablet, please provide proof to backup your claim

 

Kindle runs a fork of the Android OS, That it needs to run Google Play to be classified as such is not a requirement for generally classifying it an Android tablet except to Google Inc. Especially since a Kindle owner can get all the Android crapware they want from Amazon.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #51 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

What am I missing in this article? Where are you getting a 90%. Looks like 48.2% iOS.

 

With the Android skewed and Apple skewed sites you have to be careful of how they portray the headlines, because they tend to really cherry pick and skew data.  If 90% of the data stinks for them, they will highlight the good 10% and portray themselves as 'winning'

 

TS is probably off with the 90% remark- but not too far off.  The thing to recognize is 'user market share' vs 'sales market share'  In user market share Apple was at one point somewhere around 80-85%  Apple had a huge start in tablets, and the initial Android tablets sold poorly.  What the data above shows is sales market share.  Right now Android tablet sales are growing at a much more rapid rate than Apple sales- to the point where their actual sales percentages are pretty even.  There are far more tablets 'already out there' from the previous several years of sales.  So having android tablet sales match iPad sales for 1 quarter is going to drag the 80-85% user share down some, but nowhere near to a 48% split.  Since tablets generally have a useful life @2 years, if the numbers persist it means in 2 years the two tablet types will have a similar user share.

 

Windows actually did fairly well for a new system and could stand to improve quite a bit if businesses adopt it as a 'windows pc' equivalent.  Few people other than engineers, architects, and computer scientists actually use their personal computers for any kind of computing.  They use it as a web browser and email portal.  That's where tablets shine and the reason they are killing the pc market.

 

To answer someone else's question of 'who is using android tablets' increasingly I think the answer is:  People who have android phones.  It is annoying to have one Apple device.  Apple tries to force you into their ecosystem and doesn't work so seamlessly with outside options.  It is great if you go ALL apple, but anything else forget it.  I used to use an Apple tablet even despite that because they were far ahead of Android.  I've switched to an Android tablet and it feels like its actually quite a bit ahead of an Apple tablet (granted I gave my Apple tablet to my parents and haven't used the latest Apple version- so things may have changed).  As a tablet the Android version actually feels more like an operating system where Apple was simply a 'grid of icons' and you use one App at a time.  People deriding Android tablets post things that are way off the mark from my experiences- but I expect that, most of them are Apple fans maybe a little in the realm of denial/wishful thinking rather than forming their opinions based on actual usage.

 

Either way I think tablets are just going to follow phone preference.  It wouldn't make much sense for an iPhone user to go out and buy and Android tablet and not be able to use all their Apple purchased stuff.  Increasingly the converse is holding true for Android tablets.  I think adding TV's and Smartwatches to the mix is only going to enforce things even more.  Pick your ecosystem and stick with it.

post #52 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

In Phoenix metro it is closer to 90-95%.

I would say that the percentage in the San Francisco Bay Area is near 80% - 90% in favor of iPad.
post #53 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Channel stuffing is the business practice where a company, or a sales force within a company, inflates its sales figures by forcing more products through a distribution channel than the channel is capable of selling to the world at large. Also known as "trade loading", this can be the result of a company attempting to inflate its sales figures.


Vendor: "We'll give you a discount on our product if you commit to taking x-quantity. You can return any remaining quantity after y--time period without any financial penalty."
Retail: "Sure."

This is a pretty common tactic.

I have a feeling you left out ...

"Then as soon as you return them we'll ship you a load more and you can ship those back too ..."
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #54 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

3%. I guess Microsoft is now enjoying the kind of market share Apple's had in the desktop and laptop market. Oh well, I guess Microsoft is becoming less relevant. Good. It's about time.

 

It's like a "rounding error" if Ballmer is to be believed.

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post #55 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Kindle runs a fork of the Android OS, That it needs to run Google Play to be classified as such is not a requirement for generally classifying it an Android tablet except to Google Inc. Especially since a Kindle owner can get all the Android crapware they want from Amazon.

Google defines what is Android, and you'll find they don't class Kindle as Android
post #56 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


Why would it include those? They don't come with Google Play, which means they aren't Android tablets.

 

So the Kindle Fire & Nook are counted in "Other" with ~1% of sales between them.

 

I see 0_o

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post #57 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

OK. 
Okay honest question. Why would retailers continue to take shipments if the product was not selling? Why would a manufacture continue to put money into a product that wasn't selling? So on some level shipments have to mean something.

I've got an honest question too (and its not the first time I've asked you): why is Apple the only one to report (i) channel inventory; (ii) volumes?

I am sure the shipments mean something "at some level" but I am not sure what, and at what level.
post #58 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

So the Kindle Fire & Nook are counted in "Other" with ~1% of sales between them.

I see 0_o

They must be, as they are running a fork of Android, not android itself.
post #59 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

I still want to know who is actually using all those Android tablets. With phones, you could always argue people just use them as feature phones to explain the 100's of million of missing phones in use but with tablets??? That just does not make sense to me.

My niece has a Kindle tablet and she likes it for reading and surfing. To each their own.

post #60 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

I still want to know who is actually using all those Android tablets. With phones, you could always argue people just use them as feature phones to explain the 100's of million of missing phones in use but with tablets??? That just does not make sense to me.

Most of the people that i've talked to that buy Android tablets seem to kids for just general use, nothing industry specific, or the elderly on a budget that have the most basic of needs.  Business professionals?  NOPE, they go with iPads because that's where the more professional quality apps and hardware are at.

 

It would be interesting to see some market research company do a fairly in depth analysis of the demographics of each brand/model tablet and OS platform.

 

What I've also noticed is that home automation is becoming more prevalent and there are more solutions around iPads than Android and more expensive home automation customers are going with iPads and they many times have iPads throughout the house, but with all of the family members.  For home automation, they typically start around $2,000 and go up drastically from there and the people that buy those systems are typically educated and have high salaries and have a substantial investment portfolio.

 

I think these Android products typically go for people that look at the price and features/specs but ignore things like security, support, reliability, and malware issues, and how the OS is updated.  They may not always be the most astute when it comes to product selection and they'll switch brands as the wind blows and they probably just have fairly basic needs and they don't typically buy high end professional apps and since they don't spend as much on the physical product, they consider them throw away devices.

post #61 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by NelsonX View Post

Really? And how come Samsung managed to have a 7 billion profit by... inflating their sales figures? If they aren't selling that much how could they grow their profits? By magic maybe?

 

 

Samsung also makes home appliances, components and TV sets as part of their revenue stream, the mobile devices is probably about half of their profits.
post #62 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

They must be, as they are running a fork of Android, not android itself.

Google isn't the one creating the report, therefore it stands to reason that ALL flavors of Android (note I'm saying Android, which is open source, not Google Android) is grouped together under the "Android" umbrella.

If you really think the Kindle and Nook, two of the more popular "android" tablets, are in the small other category, I think you're being purposely obtuse.
post #63 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


Google defines what is Android, and you'll find they don't class Kindle as Android

 

Sooo.... that could be because they don't want manufacturers forking their OS. Will they stop counting Samsung devices as Android when they fork the OS??

 

The rest of the world seems to count the Kindle as an android device and that's where it counts.

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post #64 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

 

I think these Android products typically go for people that look at the price and features/specs but ignore things like security, support, reliability, and malware issues, and how the OS is updated.  They may not always be the most astute when it comes to product selection and they'll switch brands as the wind blows and they probably just have fairly basic needs and they don't typically buy high end professional apps and since they don't spend as much on the physical product, they consider them throw away devices.

 

There's noting like a cheap Android tablet to check off a gift for a relative's kid... Kindles sell to people who only want a reading device. Lots of reasons for a second-rate product. People even buy the dead-in-the-water Surface RT, ignorance is bliss.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #65 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


I've got an honest question too (and its not the first time I've asked you): why is Apple the only one to report (i) channel inventory; (ii) volumes?

I am sure the shipments mean something "at some level" but I am not sure what, and at what level.

Because Apple is number one and leading the pack in every area, they don't need to hide poor performance with vague numbers such as "shipments."

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #66 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

I still want to know who is actually using all those Android tablets. With phones, you could always argue people just use them as feature phones to explain the 100's of million of missing phones in use but with tablets??? That just does not make sense to me.

 

I know a couple people who use them almost exclusively for games with a tiny bit of web browsing via WiFi. Then again, they didn't buy the tablets, they got them as gifts.

post #67 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

[...] It would be interesting to see some market research company do a fairly in depth analysis of the demographics of each brand/model tablet and OS platform.

 

How? Unless you supplied your age, income, place of residence and occupation when you bought your tablet, where is an analytics company going to get that information?

post #68 of 129
it's not a tablet if you have to have a keyboard and pointing device to even use the configuration app [Settings]
post #69 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

Google isn't the one creating the report, therefore it stands to reason that ALL flavors of Android (note I'm saying Android, which is open source, not Google Android) is grouped together under the "Android" umbrella.

If you really think the Kindle and Nook, two of the more popular "android" tablets, are in the small other category, I think you're being purposely obtuse.

I'm being obtuse? There is a major difference between being correct and obtuse, if you are going to be that loose with the definition you may as well just group Android in with all linux based tablets
post #70 of 129
Everything the average user wants is on android tablets for less money than an iPad.

It's no mystery why Android is repeating the whole Mac vs PC thing. We're seeing iOS decline just as Mac OS declined back in the day of Windows 95.
post #71 of 129

This number is very much misleading. Those people were simply buying ultra portable notebook. They didn't look for a tablet...

 

However, it is more puzzling that Android share is so big. We have Galaxy Tab II and Nexus test units at work, it is unbelievable piece of crap. Everything: software and hardware. I guess the major share is going on cheap devices from Amazon to the bottom...

 

Whoever buys so-called premium Android tablet must be a very sick person that wakes up every morning with one sole purpose: to hate Apple.

post #72 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by 512ke View Post

Everything the average user wants is on android tablets for less money than an iPad.

It's no mystery why Android is repeating the whole Mac vs PC thing. We're seeing iOS decline just as Mac OS declined back in the day of Windows 95.

 

You mean: Apple hating user? Android tablets are just piece of crap. I'm working with so-called premium tablets at work and I can say I expected something will change in 3 years. Hasn't, really. It's still crap in a bit fancier package than back then.

 

It is of course no mystery that Android is gaining share. It will gain even more. Android serves as FOC OS for bunch of hardware manufacturers. Same as with PC, same principle, same crap. Serves the purpose of mass disctribution regardless to quality and experience. Serves the purpose of manufacturers, not the users.

post #73 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

I still want to know who is actually using all those Android tablets. With phones, you could always argue people just use them as feature phones to explain the 100's of million of missing phones in use but with tablets??? That just does not make sense to me.

I'm not following you.

My company has both iPhones and Androids and both are used in pretty much the same manner. Are you trying to insinuate that Android phones are not/cannot be used as smartphones?

Re tablets. I got my Android tablet (1st gen Asus Transformer) as a gift back in 2011, and I have been using it since. I don't think I will be buying another Android tablet, but regardless, this one served fine. In fact, I had 1st gen iPad for about 6 weeks in early 2011 (got it for my mother who lives overseas and was using it for mentioned period before visiting her), and I cannot say there was anything I could have done with iPad that I couldn't on that Android tablet - for my usage model.

I don't see a reson why majority of customers could not use either iPad or Android tablet, unless they require specific app that exists only on one platform. I know only one person so far, a friend who is a pilot amateur and uses some sort of piloting-navigational-map software (great replacement for a huge book of paper-printed maps) that does not exist on Android.
post #74 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Why would I expect that?

Full MS Office compatibility (or any other software being used in corporation)
AD and Group Policies friendly
Remote management/support same as on desktop/laptop
Easiest access to network shares, SharePoint, CRM...
Docking stations (on selected models) supporting external monitors, kbd/mouse, Ethernet
Same SSL VPN standards as with laptops.

If given company's IT is based on Windows tech, you'd really have to work hard to find a reason why not going for Win 8 Pro tablets. Comparable size, weight, battery life and price to iPads and Androids, with all the above mentioned advantages, and yes, those are huge advantages for business users.

I work in IT company. Regardless of both of my bosses having iPads and iPhones (and loving them), we have stopped recommending any other tablets to our customers beside Thinkpad Tablet 2 and, just recently, ElitePad 900. They can BYO if they want, but they usually listen to us as we do argue our recommendations well.
post #75 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


Full MS Office compatibility (or any other software being used in corporation)
AD and Group Policies friendly
Remote management/support same as on desktop/laptop
Easiest access to network shares, SharePoint, CRM...
Docking stations (on selected models) supporting external monitors, kbd/mouse, Ethernet
Same SSL VPN standards as with lapto

If given company's IT is based on Windows tech, you'd really have to work hard to find a reason why not going for Win 8 Pro tablets. Comparable size, weight, battery life and price to iPads and Androids, with all the above mentioned advantages, and yes, those are huge advantages for business users.

I work in IT company. Regardless of both of my bosses having iPads and iPhones (and loving them), we have stopped recommending any other tablets to our customers beside Thinkpad Tablet 2 and, just recently, ElitePad 900. They can BYO if they want, but they usually listen to us as we do argue our recommendations well.

 

 

You have quoted all the attributes of corporate PC, in this case notebook. THis is what I am saying: people who bought Slates were buying ultra portable notebooks. Concepts from your list have nothing to do with tablets. Tablets are not meant to be managed from IT administrator to justify its position.

 

From what you've written it is clear of course without explicitly saying that you work in IT infrastructure company. Such companies would not exist in such excess if there were no Microsoft and HP and similar. Suggesting ElitePad to customer instead of iPad serves primarily your purpose, not customers. I worked in such company for 10 years as well, I know rules of the game all too well.

post #76 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


I'm not following you.

My company has both iPhones and Androids and both are used in pretty much the same manner. Are you trying to insinuate that Android phones are not/cannot be used as smartphones?

Re tablets. I got my Android tablet (1st gen Asus Transformer) as a gift back in 2011, and I have been using it since. I don't think I will be buying another Android tablet, but regardless, this one served fine. In fact, I had 1st gen iPad for about 6 weeks in early 2011 (got it for my mother who lives overseas and was using it for mentioned period before visiting her), and I cannot say there was anything I could have done with iPad that I couldn't on that Android tablet - for my usage model.

I don't see a reson why majority of customers could not use either iPad or Android tablet, unless they require specific app that exists only on one platform. I know only one person so far, a friend who is a pilot amateur and uses some sort of piloting-navigational-map software (great replacement for a huge book of paper-printed maps) that does not exist on Android.

 

It depends on usage. I would never buy a device even for only 100 $ to be able just to surf the net as bad as it is possible or read a mail from now to then. But some people do. For me the end of usage of Android table starts when I swipe the screen and the latest monster model "coughs" when sliding almost empty screen with windows 3.11 - like icons....

 

I would reverse your point: why buying something for 100$ less if I can do the same and more in the best possible way on right device?  I will tell you why. There are 3 reasons:

 

- never tried the right device

- was advised by a fried who "knows about computers" and never laid a hand on anything from Apple.

- got it in the mobile carrier package for less than free or when buying barbie doll

- pure ignorance

 

Take your pick.

post #77 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

I couldn't disagree more. Nobody wants to use a tablet to create office documents. The screen and cover/keyboard offer a poor typing experience compared to today's desktops. It sounds like a good idea, but the experience will be rather cumbersome for anyone who wants to do real work. Tablets are and will remain consumption devices for the foreseeable future. It sounds like Apple has the right tack - maximize the experience. Microsoft is trying to leverage a product designed for a very different experience across its tablets. I predict a poor experience and dissatisfied users.

You are too focused on tablet itself.

Take a look at previously mentioned Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2 and HP ElitePad 900. Both have docking stations with LAN, monitor, USB ports. We have tested one is our office. If you don't multitask a lot (only 2GB of RAM), dual core Atom with Hypertreading can suffice. Outlook, Excel, Word... work fine. If you need more power, it also works great as thin client, remoting to terminal server. Either way, you will be using it on big desktop monitor, with desktop keyboard and mouse. Once you are done, you will pull it from dock, take it to meeting room or anywhere else, plug to flat screen or projector and run your PowerPoint presentation, show Excel spreadsheet to customer as you would show printouts, review document you were typing in desktop mode (or document someone else created and saved to SharePoint).

Or, you will have a PC (laptop or desktop) for office work/document creation ant tablet for document presentation/reviewing. Either way, you have 100% transparency with file compatibility and every other requirement your company's IT might have set. No document conversions, no formatting lost, no workarounds for anything.

I'm not saying that every office worker will have a tablet or completely move to tablet any time soon (or at all), but there are already many usage scenarios where current Windows tablets can do very well.
post #78 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


You are too focused on tablet itself.

Take a look at previously mentioned Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2 and HP ElitePad 900. Both have docking stations with LAN, monitor, USB ports. We have tested one is our office. If you don't multitask a lot (only 2GB of RAM), dual core Atom with Hypertreading can suffice. Outlook, Excel, Word... work fine. If you need more power, it also works great as thin client, remoting to terminal server. Either way, you will be using it on big desktop monitor, with desktop keyboard and mouse. Once you are done, you will pull it from dock, take it to meeting room or anywhere else, plug to flat screen or projector and run your PowerPoint presentation, show Excel spreadsheet to customer as you would show printouts, review document you were typing in desktop mode (or document someone else created and saved to SharePoint).

Or, you will have a PC (laptop or desktop) for office work/document creation ant tablet for document presentation/reviewing. Either way, you have 100% transparency with file compatibility and every other requirement your company's IT might have set. No document conversions, no formatting lost, no workarounds for anything.

I'm not saying that every office worker will have a tablet or completely move to tablet any time soon (or at all), but there are already many usage scenarios where current Windows tablets can do very well.

 

Again, you are describing light notebook....I am not saying this will not happen. On contrary: I believe it will. I believe this will finally replace even the ultra light notebooks, but you have to understand the notebooks became wide-spreaded when they've finally dealt with tradeoffs  compared to desktops. Same story here: unless tradeoffs are dealt with: no go. 

 

But when this happen, tablets and the notebooks as we know them will be in demise. Only god knows what will happen even to keyboards.

post #79 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post

You mean: Apple hating user? Android tablets are just piece of crap. I'm working with so-called premium tablets at work and I can say I expected something will change in 3 years. Hasn't, really. It's still crap in a bit fancier package than back then.

It is of course no mystery that Android is gaining share. It will gain even more. Android serves as FOC OS for bunch of hardware manufacturers. Same as with PC, same principle, same crap. Serves the purpose of mass disctribution regardless to quality and experience. Serves the purpose of manufacturers, not the users.

It is pretty much given you are Android hating user. Hard to take you seriously at all.
post #80 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post

It depends on usage. I would never buy a device even for only 100 $ to be able just to surf the net as bad as it is possible or read a mail from now to then. But some people do. For me the end of usage of Android table starts when I swipe the screen and the latest monster model "coughs" when sliding almost empty screen with windows 3.11 - like icons....

I would reverse your point: why buying something for 100$ less if I can do the same and more in the best possible way on right device?  I will tell you why. There are 3 reasons:

- never tried the right device
- was advised by a fried who "knows about computers" and never laid a hand on anything from Apple.
- got it in the mobile carrier package for less than free or when buying barbie doll
- pure ignorance

Take your pick.

OK, I'll take a bait. What "serious" things are you doing on your iPad?
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