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post #41 of 50

Other phone makers would give anything to have this kind of leverage to dictate terms to a carrier.  Apple has it, they want it, there is money to be made, here are the terms.
 

post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Other phone makers would give anything to have this kind of leverage to dictate terms to a carrier.  Apple has it, they want it, there is money to be made, here are the terms.
 

The difference is that other phone makers have no faith in their product at their starting price point, so they fold easily so that they can at least make back what money they have into the hardware.  Motorola and Nokia were notorious for this.  Low cost/low margin phones were the norm before the iPhone, unless you were talking about a PDA that was a phone.  Carriers would make a killing on the monthly fee because there was practically no subsidy to pay the phone maker back.

post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

First off, car analogies never work with phones 1smile.gif

For example, Lamborghinis are not owned by a large chunk of the world's sports car drivers.


It was because of a few carriers around the world early last year announcing that they were dropping the iPhone because of the high subsidies, that analysts started the whole "OMG Apple needs to make a cheaper phone" theme.  At the time, it was feared to be a trend that could accelerate.

You have a list of those carriers? I believe it was analysts who were guessing some carriers would drop the iPhone. I don't think that ever happened, however.

Perhaps a better analogy would be jewelry stores. Tiffany's isn't selling costume jewelry.
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Prohibitive carrier requirements made by Apple have prevented some 2.8 billion customers from having access to the iPhone, according to a new analysis.

 

In further news prohibitive monetary requirements made by Ferrari have prevented some 7 billion customers from having access to their sports cars, according to a new analysis.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Barriault View Post

What is with the obsession that every company (okay, just Apple really) should make every product line available to every market and every price point? I can't buy a diesel MINI Cooper D in Canada, and couldn't afford the turbocharged Cooper SD even if it was - but I'm perfectly happy with my naturally-aspirated petrol Cooper.

 

That's capitalism. Once you saturate a market, you are expected to saturate all other markets or fail as a company (if you're public). Capitalism isn't sustainable because perpetual growth is not possible in any market for any product. Nothing is perpetual except change.

post #46 of 50
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post
Capitalism isn't sustainable…

 

Hoo boy.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #47 of 50
Stupid comparison. There's a 2-3 years waiting time for a Ferrari, iphone doesn't. Big difference between a phone and a car.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by bleh1234 View Post

Stupid comparison. There's a 2-3 years waiting time for a Ferrari, iphone doesn't. Big difference between a phone and a car.

I could walk into a dealer today and buy a Ferrari...

...if only I had the money.

Choose any product you want, there is a segment of the world's population who can't afford it.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

You have a list of those carriers? I believe it was analysts who were guessing some carriers would drop the iPhone. I don't think that ever happened, however.

 

Back in Nov 2011, Czech carrier Telefonica (O2) decided not "to carry Apple’s iPhone 4S and is dropping all prior iPhone models, citing “business terms”.  (...)  The spokesperson blamed it on struggling sales in the local market, describing iPhone sales in the country as “pretty small and well below Android models and even still Nokia phones.

 

A couple of months later, Telefonica and Vodafone both decided to drop subsidies in Spain, which included the iPhone. (Later they decided this was a mistake, but it helped ignite investor worries in the US.)

 

I also seem to recall a carrier in Northern Europe that dropped subsidies and perhaps the iPhone. I'm trying to find a link to that.

post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Hey. Analysts. THIS IS BY DESIGN. SHUT UP.

 

It would be nice if the article actually MENTIONED more than ONE of the so-called "strict conditions" mentioned in the headline or the "prohibitive carrier requirements" noted in the very first line. The wording is obviously intended to make it appear that Apple is doing something wrong, but there's nothing in the article to support that position.

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