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Adobe shows off new Creative Cloud features with across the board updates

post #1 of 126
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Adobe's popular Creative Suite got more than just a rebranding on Monday, as the company also revealed a number of new and advanced features for the rechristened Creative Cloud package.



Customers buying Adobe's new subscription-based Creative Cloud service will see improved capabilities across Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash Pro, After Effects, Muse, Dreamweaver, and other titles. In perhaps Adobe's best-known offering, Photoshop, the most notable new feature is a tool that reduces image blur brought on by camera shake. Photoshop also includes a redesigned Smart Sharpen utility, improved upsampling, and the ability to apply RAW edits as a filter in any layer.



Illustrator CC adds the ability to use the Touch Type tool to manipulate characters like individual objects. Users also can take images such as bitmaps and turn them into brushes, and the program can now generate CSS code by itself, allowing users to create web elements more easily. The vector drawing program also added increased support for multitouch devices and styluses.

InDesign CC now includes 64-bit support, a new user interface, Retina Display support, and the inclusion of Adobe's Creative Cloud sharing features. It also gets performance enhancements and a new QR Code Creator.



Adobe's color-picking Kuler program saw a new iPhone application introduced today, giving users the ability to export to Illustrator CC. It also includes new preset color modes, allowing users to create color themes and share them throughout Creative Cloud software.

Adobe's video editor improved with redesigned user interfaces and streamlined editing in the case of Premiere Pro CC and Cinema 4D integration in the case of After Effects CC. Flash Pro CC adds a 64-bit architecture and redesigned UI, while another web development offering, Dreamweaver CC, adds a new CSS Designer.

With the move to the exclusively subscription-based Creative Cloud, Adobe will stop releasing updates for Creative Suite products. Creative Suite 6 will still be sold and supported, but new features will only come to Creative Cloud products from here forward.
post #2 of 126

Perpetual payments. Gotta love it. 1oyvey.gif

post #3 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDave View Post

Perpetual payments. Gotta love it. 1oyvey.gif

I don't know what the big deal is. Apple has a subscription iCloud service, so does Netflix, MLB, NBA, Dropbox, etc. Most people are used to paying their health insurance, auto insurance, mortgage, TV and cell phone bills every single month whether they use them or not. It is just another monthly bill. If you need Adobe products, you opt in. If not you don't. No one is holding a gun to your head. 

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post #4 of 126

CS6 just became Adobe's "Windows XP".

 

With no new perpetual license option, creatives will be using CS6 for a long, long, long, long time. Until such time as Adobe realizes they made a huge mistake and backpedal, customers vote with their lack of enthusiasm for a subscription model, or years after Adobe removes all options to purchase CS6 licenses, I anticipate most will continue using CS6.

 

Get your CS6 licenses while you can kids!

post #5 of 126

"I don't know what the big deal is. Apple has a subscription iCloud service, so does Netflix, MLB, NBA, Dropbox, etc. Most people are used to paying their health insurance, auto insurance, mortgage, TV and cell phone bills every single month whether they use them or not. It is just another monthly bill. If you need Adobe products, you opt in. If not you don't. No one is holding a gun to your head."

 

Finally, someone with a clear head about this!  Practically everyone else seems to be shouting, "The sky is falling!" repeatedly.  Either this, or they seem to think they know better than the folks at Adobe how Adobe should function as a business.  

post #6 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't know what the big deal is. Apple has a subscription iCloud service, so does Netflix, MLB, NBA, Dropbox, etc. Most people are used to paying their health insurance, auto insurance, mortgage, TV and cell phone bills every single month whether they use them or not. It is just another monthly bill. If you need Adobe products, you opt in. If not you don't. No one is holding a gun to your head. 


Lets put it this way...

Say you have this camera that is AWESOME and you take tons of pictures with it. Now the manufacturer of that camera says that you need to pay them $60 every month to be able to see those pictures. If you stop paying for a month, you can not see your pictures.

Does that sound cool?

 

You now have to pay Adobe FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE.

post #7 of 126
What about Lightroom and Photoshop Elements products - are they going to be available only as a subscription service too?
post #8 of 126

You can still buy iTunes songs without subscription, you can buy or rent the same movies on Netflix elsewhere, you can watch MLB games on TV. Adobe is effectively a monopoly with the fact they are the industry standard for particular pieces of software. For a long time I did not feel the upgrade price was worth it. So I would skip versions. Now that is no longer an option. You must pay because they are what everyone uses.

post #9 of 126
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
I don't know what the big deal is.

 

I don't understand why some people would be okay living in a world where they don't own anything they own.

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post #10 of 126

If you pay for Cloud, Lightroom is included. However you should still be able to buy them individually.

post #11 of 126

I subscribed to it.  It all depends of the math.  I want to stay current but the astronomical price for the packages I wanted forced me to stay behind.  I'm paying $29/mo right now.  Considering how much the packages cost and to stay current, the subscription model allowed me to use them all and pay a far less price than I would have paid if I upgraded every other year.

The only one thing I don't like is that I don't ever really own the software so if I stop paying the service, it all goes bye-bye.  Sure, I'd love to use alternatives but the reality is Adobe's tools are the standard to me.  Others will argue that.

A plus for business is that it can be classified as a monthly expense as opposed to a capital expenditure.  That's more tax-friendly.  However, I know quite a few businesses in the past that would just buy one copy and install it on everyone's computers.  Say bye-bye to that.

post #12 of 126

> If you need Adobe products, you opt in. If not you don't. No one is holding a gun to your head. 

 

Clearly a gun-to-your-head is the most apt analogy to why people might be upset.

 

And Adobe no longer makes a product- they now offer a service.

 

A service you can never own - so let's say in three years they want to increase the fee to $60,000 a year - people might be upset. And then you'd say "Well, they didn't put a gun to your head."

 

Right now if you buy Photoshop you own it, and it'll continue to function forever.

 

And if you need some money you can sell your original copy to someone else and transfer the license to them - you'll never be able to do that under this model.

post #13 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't know what the big deal is. Apple has a subscription iCloud service, so does Netflix, MLB, NBA, Dropbox, etc. Most people are used to paying their health insurance, auto insurance, mortgage, TV and cell phone bills every single month whether they use them or not. It is just another monthly bill. If you need Adobe products, you opt in. If not you don't. No one is holding a gun to your head. 


I, for one, am glad I signed up for the creative cloud.  The apps I need are right there, the apps I may need once or twice are available, and with licenses for two machines, I can even download apps at work if I get in a pinch. 

post #14 of 126

A few more things:

It's $600 a year for the suite??? $49.99 a month.

 

How will pre-press shops use this? I know many shops that keep older version of Photoshop and even Quark around to match what their clients are using exactly.

 

What happens if I make a very complex Illustrator file using the cloud and then the cloud "updates" the software version and the next time I open it my file doesn't render in the same manner. This is a real concern - if you can't control which version you're on exactly you'll run into a bunch of re-work.

 

They've taken a way a lot of control - and given you less ownership rights. It's a great model for the business - not so great for the consumer.

 

Maybe someone will ship a product to compete again.

post #15 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

The only one thing I don't like is that I don't ever really own the software so if I stop paying the service, it all goes bye-bye.

 

You own nothing and you can't sell your software after you're done with it.

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post #16 of 126

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

You own nothing and you can't sell your software after you're done with it.

 

Of all the software I've owned, no one wanted to buy it because its several version behind it.  If you can find a buyer for 4+ year old software, good for you.  I don't, and if I were in the market, I certainly would not be wanting to purchase something that's already outdated.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomhayes View Post

A few more things:

It's $600 a year for the suite??? $49.99 a month.

 

How will pre-press shops use this? I know many shops that keep older version of Photoshop and even Quark around to match what their clients are using exactly.

 

What happens if I make a very complex Illustrator file using the cloud and then the cloud "updates" the software version and the next time I open it my file doesn't render in the same manner. This is a real concern - if you can't control which version you're on exactly you'll run into a bunch of re-work.

 

They've taken a way a lot of control - and given you less ownership rights. It's a great model for the business - not so great for the consumer.

 

Maybe someone will ship a product to compete again.



That argument gets old.  If a client is using a really old version of Illustrator, I don't think it should be everyone else's problem that they too have to own all that old stuff.  It's great that print shops do.  I would think in the age of virtual machines, they can load up individual VM's preloaded with old software and continue using it.

I always get into this argument with people that have 10+ old software and then complain when their software doesn't work well with a newest version of something. Sorry, either stay current (and unfortunately feed the machine) or roll the dice and hope your stuff still works down the road.

post #17 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

You own nothing and you can't sell your software after you're done with it.

 

At least with the old model, if you keep the same computer around with the software installed on it, you can use it for the lifetime of that computer (just don't do major OS upgrades).  With the new model, you can only use it for as long as you keep paying the fees.

 
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post #18 of 126
While I'm mixed about their strategy, I inherently hate the idea of being tied to monthly payments.

I've been professionally designing since 1992, and owned my share of Adobe products. There were stints between regular employment that I was never able to upgrade to the latest version of stuff, while trying to be a freelancer. So I used what I had and made it work. But they were my copies, I physically had the discs. There was no way that I could afford any kind of extra monthly payment to keep the software. Plus, certain jobs would likely take longer than 30 days before I ever got a check from a client. This also assumes that everyone has internet all the time. What about rural designers who live out in the sticks and fast streaming internet is non-existant? I fell into that category for 10 years.

Here's where I do like the idea: Professionalism has a price of entry. Period. I hate low ball designers who don't charge what they should be charging and therefore saturate the market with crap, and make it hard for us who are good at what we do to be able to price accordingly. Having a monthly payment kinda means that you have to put "business" as a priority over casual designers that happen to have a "copy" of high end design software.

Adobe is trying to protect their empire and bottom line. I've got no problem with that. I just don't like how we can get squeezed out of an industry just because we don't feel like we should have to upgrade every fricken version. I'm a true believer that every ODD NUMBERED Creative Suite is the best, and the even numbers are just stop gaps between the real good and worthwhile upgrades.
post #19 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDave View Post

Perpetual payments. Gotta love it. 1oyvey.gif

It's good and bad.. The suite was massively expensive.. thousands of dollars in some cases depending on what tools you needed..

If you only need the tools for a few months.. guess what.. you only pay for a few months of service.. it's not like you're committed to a 2 year contract, as some licensing agreements are. 

 

Now, individuals can get into the tools they want peace meal at a more affordable cost.. Granted, yes, it's endless payments.. but most will look at the 'annual' cost.. because any serious developer or artist would be constantly looking at the upgrades anyway.. This simply removes that aspect and ensures you are updated. 

 

@EchoMouse I agree with your odd numbered upgrades bit. However, generally, cloud based services like this don't get 'massive' version number upgrades like software. It's a gradual process where they add a feature, but allow for using 'classic' incase of issues. It also lets them casually push out new features.. With the cloud version, I highly suspect the days of 'major release' are done with. 


Edited by Adrayven - 5/6/13 at 3:14pm
post #20 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiomusic View Post

Say you have this camera that is AWESOME and you take tons of pictures with it. Now the manufacturer of that camera says that you need to pay them $60 every month to be able to see those pictures. If you stop paying for a month, you can not see your pictures.
Does that sound cool?

You now have to pay Adobe FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE.

Not quite, you can put your creative files into a format usable outside of the suite. If you make a website using any of the Edge tools, Dreamweaver or Fireworks, your files are in HTML/PHP/CSS/PNG formats. If you make a design in Indesign/Illustrator, it can be AI/EPS/SVG/PDF, if you make a movie in After Effects, it's a movie file that comes out, if you do something in Photoshop or Lightroom, it's PSD/RAW or any other image format.

The only problem is that you can't edit those files with the same workflow. When you need to edit them, pay Adobe for a month usage. Otherwise, you should be able to view most of the files using something as basic as Quicklook.

You're looking it this from the point of view that CS 6 will work on every version of OS X for the next 50 years and so 50 years for $1500 is better value than $600 for 50 years ($30,000). This isn't what actually happens though. All it takes is for Apple to make one OS update that breaks the software and you'd have to fork out for a very expensive upgrade when you didn't expect it - most likely a full suite payment.

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post #21 of 126

>I always get into this argument with people that have 10+ old software and then complain when their software doesn't work well with a newest version of something. >Sorry, either stay current (and unfortunately feed the machine) or roll the dice and hope your stuff still works down the road.

 

I don't think you actually work with real businesses. 10 year old software arguments? Try 2 year old software. Small businesses don't spend thousands of dollars on upgrades unless there's a significant business reason to do so.

 

I had a client that did a series of drawings for a book in CS3. When CS4 came out a few months later and he opened the files in the new version they were very messy (layers mis-rendered, points in places that were no supposed to have points, kerning changed.).  We uninstalled CS4 and went back to CS3. The pre-press shop had kept several machines on CS3 too.

 

What if he was using the May version of Cloud, and then cloud updates in June and he's still working on the files and now he has to re-do a significant amount of work due to bugs introduced in the new version? (Or maybe not even bugs, just changes.) Is it his job to continually update his files because Adobe issues  updates??

 

Actually, your attitude seems perfectly suited for Adobe - you should HONESTLY apply for a job there.

 

 

 

And the "stay of the very latest venison of the software model" DOES NOT FLY in major businesses with the IT departments. Software needs to be tested before it can be deployed.

post #22 of 126
A monthly fee forever is more expensive than a one-time fee. I am in my 11th year using Photoshop 7.0. It's all I need for basic editing. Under their new price structure, Photoshop alone would have cost me $2398.80. Congrats to Adobe if they can pull off this essentially-infinite price increase. And no tears if they don't.

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post #23 of 126

All I use from Adobe is Dreamweaver. I really don't want to pay for the whole suite. Guess I'll be checking out WebStorm and other tools.

post #24 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

A monthly fee forever is more expensive than a one-time fee. I am in my 11th year using Photoshop 7.0. It's all I need for basic editing. Under their new price structure, Photoshop alone would have cost me $2398.80. Congrats to Adobe if they can pull off this essentially-infinite price increase. And no tears if they don't.


"Basic editing"??  Please.  Stick with Microsoft Paint then.  Honestly.  If you're happy using an 11-year old package great.  Are you doing serious professional-grade work?

Tools are just that.  Tools.  It's in the hand of the user can use those tools to their benefit.  On the flip side, a pro-designer can (and usually is) best served with staying current if they want to use the most modern technology.

I mean really.  My car is 17 years old and it's all I need for basic driving.  What's your point?

post #25 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I don't understand why some people would be okay living in a world where they don't own anything they own.

It is possible that this is a generational trend. For example, Steve Jobs' talked about wanting to own an artifact of music (say, the physical media such as vinyl), and valuing the experience of the album art or inserts--all part of the experience of having music. Its clear to me that Apple has successfully translated that experience into a digital form. But there's a new trend among millennials who didn't grow up with that don't seem to care about albums (physical artifacts). They grew up digitally, and they value things like discovery, sharing, maybe even the ability to remix songs easily. And they're not expecting to have to buy whole albums. They expect to be able to hyperlink between songs as easily as surfing the web. Music discovery and sharing (telling the world, not piracy) is more important. That new generation is less likely to own music, but instead pay for license to stream any song from a large library of tunes. Streaming personal radio or something similar. Instead of "I have songs on my iPod" it'll be "I have ubiquitous wireless Internet and I can steam my music from anywhere."

There is a similar trend where people in dense urban areas forgo car ownership for a service such as Car2Go.com or ZipCar.com. Or watching a movie on streaming or PPV instead of buying the DVD. These are just examples of what is sometimes called the "experience based economy" as opposed to an "ownership based economy." they are ultimately two somewhat different forms of consumption. Ownership economies are based on very ancient notions of scarcity (limited supply or production runs of physical media) while the experience economies assumes content and software can be (1) easily duplicated and (2) universally accessible on demand.

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post #26 of 126
Ill be buying some PS alternative. We'll see how much I can use it, and how soon I can get away from Adobe entirely. It's not easy: Adobe has a real stranglehold on us.

But this I know: whatever files I create in a non-Photoshop app I can still access even after I close my business. Adobe wants to control my personal archive of my own creative work--forever. UNACCEPTABLE.
post #27 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

There is a similar trend where people in dense urban areas forgo car ownership for a service such as Car2Go.com or ZipCar.com. Or watching a movie on streaming or PPV instead of buying the DVD. These are just examples of what is sometimes called the "experience based economy" as opposed to an "ownership based economy." they are ultimately two somewhat different forms of consumption. Ownership economies are based on very ancient notions of scarcity (limited supply or production runs of physical media) while the experience economies assumes content and software can be (1) easily duplicated and (2) universally accessible on demand.

 

I get it.  In fact, I used car sharing for years up until the point where the monthly costs were approaching the same as ownership (family appointments).  Depreciation is what kills you on cars (but owners rarely factor it into the cost of ownership).

 

However, I do also believe that there's an element of "a sucker born every minute" in this new economy.  People see the cheap initial cost and jump right in.  However, when you factor in internet bandwidth usage costs (due to caps or costs of a higher capacity data plan), plus monthly fees, it generally ends up being more expensive in the long run.  But because people generally don't think much beyond the purchase price, they don't see it.  And then they wonder why they can't afford to live well.  All of those little monthly fees adding up to a huge chunk of their paycheque.

 
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post #28 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


"Basic editing"??  Please.  Stick with Microsoft Paint then.  Honestly.  If you're happy using an 11-year old package great.  Are you doing serious professional-grade work?

Tools are just that.  Tools.  It's in the hand of the user can use those tools to their benefit.  On the flip side, a pro-designer can (and usually is) best served with staying current if they want to use the most modern technology.

I mean really.  My car is 17 years old and it's all I need for basic driving.  What's your point?


My photo editing needs far exceed that of Microsoft Paint and Photoshop 7 is powerful enough to handle those needs.

 

My point is that being forced to rent sucks. Had you rented your car for the last 17 years (and been given a new car every year by the dealer) it would have cost you far more money than paying a fixed price for it in 1996. Not everyone needs a new car every year.


Edited by jd_in_sb - 5/6/13 at 4:22pm

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post #29 of 126

There's something disturbingly elitist about some of the comments I'm reading here and in other forums. Are people seriously thinking that there should be a minimum level of money committed by a "true professional," that if the person can't afford an ongoing monthly fee, then they should stick with simple crap? Really?

 

Being told by Company A that if I want to play with their stuff, I'm going to have to commit to paying a monthly fee from now on or I won't be able to access my own files (please, don't give me the "just convert to format XYZ" - if I wanted to work in those file formats strictly, I wouldn't be using the software in contention.) that sends a pretty strong signal to me that the company no longer, if it ever did, care about the needs or desires of its customers. If Company B comes along and offers some software package or suite that has most, but not all, of the features I'm looking for, and they don't have an onerous monthly licensing fee, guess what? They're going to get my business.

 

My Internet connection is just flaky enough that if I was foolish enough to tie myself to the newest Adobe bandwagon, I would end up bashing my head through my monitor the first time that I was unable to do what I needed to do, because Comcast burped. I also don't like the idea of being at the mercy of potentially buggy upgrades that would result in a lot of rework, and not have the option of using the previous release.

 

For the people who think this is a wonderful idea - cool. Knock yourselves out. I hope it works out for you.

post #30 of 126
"With the move to the exclusively subscription-based Creative Cloud, Adobe will stop releasing updates for Creative Suite products. "

What a load of complete horse-shit. I have no interest in subscription models so bought CS6 a couple months ago. Nice to know the product is now obsolete.
post #31 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

You own nothing and you can't sell your software after you're done with it.

 

Wrong.  It's call transferring your license, and Adobe allows this:

 

http://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/policy-pricing/transfer-product-license.html

post #32 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave MacLachlan View Post

There's something disturbingly elitist about some of the comments I'm reading here and in other forums. Are people seriously thinking that there should be a minimum level of money committed by a "true professional," that if the person can't afford an ongoing monthly fee, then they should stick with simple crap? Really?

 

Being told by Company A that if I want to play with their stuff, I'm going to have to commit to paying a monthly fee from now on or I won't be able to access my own files (please, don't give me the "just convert to format XYZ" - if I wanted to work in those file formats strictly, I wouldn't be using the software in contention.) that sends a pretty strong signal to me that the company no longer, if it ever did, care about the needs or desires of its customers. If Company B comes along and offers some software package or suite that has most, but not all, of the features I'm looking for, and they don't have an onerous monthly licensing fee, guess what? They're going to get my business.

 

My Internet connection is just flaky enough that if I was foolish enough to tie myself to the newest Adobe bandwagon, I would end up bashing my head through my monitor the first time that I was unable to do what I needed to do, because Comcast burped. I also don't like the idea of being at the mercy of potentially buggy upgrades that would result in a lot of rework, and not have the option of using the previous release.

 

For the people who think this is a wonderful idea - cool. Knock yourselves out. I hope it works out for you.

 

Elitist? It's a matter of numbers. Professionals make up a much, much smaller target audience, but they are willing to foot the bill because they make money using this software. Consumers will pay $2.99 for an app on their iPhone to clean up the shots, but don't expect them to shell out $50/month for the ability to clean up pix of the dogs and the occasional blurry party picture.

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post #33 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by the cool gut View Post

 

Wrong.  It's call transferring your license, and Adobe allows this:

 

http://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/policy-pricing/transfer-product-license.html

 

How does that work with software you no longer "own"? I was referring strictly to the new Cloud model.

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post #34 of 126

Because many users like me have felt like hostages to Adobe's near monopoly of the graphic design industry. There are times when you need your physical software. There are times you need to use it on the road, not connected to the internet. There are times when you won't need the software most of the month but still have to make the monthly payment. IT departments HATE software subscriptions.

 

Buying the software gave us 2 choices. Now we only have one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't know what the big deal is. Apple has a subscription iCloud service, so does Netflix, MLB, NBA, Dropbox, etc. Most people are used to paying their health insurance, auto insurance, mortgage, TV and cell phone bills every single month whether they use them or not. It is just another monthly bill. If you need Adobe products, you opt in. If not you don't. No one is holding a gun to your head. 

post #35 of 126
I've had it with Adobe. This will be a lot more expensive for me since I always skipped versions since there usually is no reason to upgrade (the new features are not worth it).
post #36 of 126
Holy Cow. THIS. Thank G-d I have most of the CS6 stuff free-and-clear. $600/year? Hell no.
post #37 of 126

Anyone who "can't afford" $50/mo for a CC subscription has other issues. If you can't make FAR more per month with ONE of these apps, that says you're incompetent and seriously need to examine your education/training and/or your dedication to your chosen career. OR just 'fess up and admit Adobe just made it a lot harder to steal their software, and that pisses you off. Too frickin' bad, dude.

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post #38 of 126

Young graphic artist, can't afford to buy Adobe suit. Le'ts say that they used a pirated version. When they are be good enough to be hired by a company, they already know photoshop and are ready to use the paid version bought by the company.

 

Photoshop not being available anymore, Young graphic artist will have to learn some other software.

When they will be hired by a company, they will have the choice to learn a new software (yes, more powerful but will still need to learn it) or use the one they used all those year.

 

 

I think that in the long run, the idea to be Cloud Only is not a good strategy for Adobe.

post #39 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I subscribed to it.  It all depends of the math.  I want to stay current but the astronomical price for the packages I wanted forced me to stay behind.  I'm paying $29/mo right now.  Considering how much the packages cost and to stay current, the subscription model allowed me to use them all and pay a far less price than I would have paid if I upgraded every other year.

The only one thing I don't like is that I don't ever really own the software so if I stop paying the service, it all goes bye-bye.  Sure, I'd love to use alternatives but the reality is Adobe's tools are the standard to me.  Others will argue that.

A plus for business is that it can be classified as a monthly expense as opposed to a capital expenditure.  That's more tax-friendly.  However, I know quite a few businesses in the past that would just buy one copy and install it on everyone's computers.  Say bye-bye to that.

 

so you're saying this will be bad for people who steal software?

post #40 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't know what the big deal is. Apple has a subscription iCloud service, so does Netflix, MLB, NBA, Dropbox, etc. Most people are used to paying their health insurance, auto insurance, mortgage, TV and cell phone bills every single month whether they use them or not. It is just another monthly bill. If you need Adobe products, you opt in. If not you don't. No one is holding a gun to your head. 

 

Frankly I don't get how you understand your perspective but don't understand others.

AppleInsider = Apple-in-cider. It's a joke!

I've used macs since 1985 when I typed up my first research paper. Never used anything else never wanted to.
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AppleInsider = Apple-in-cider. It's a joke!

I've used macs since 1985 when I typed up my first research paper. Never used anything else never wanted to.
Reply
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