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Apple's iOS widens lead over Android in US mobile Web traffic share

post #1 of 90
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According to a report from investment bank Piper Jaffray, Apple's share of the mobile Web is not only dominating Android in the U.S., but has shown growth at the expense of Google's operating system, leading the firm to believe iOS users are generally more engaged with their devices than owners of rival handsets.

iOS Web
Source: Investing Analytics for Piper Jaffray


In a research note furnished to AppleInsider, Piper Jaffray noted that the third party data analysis from Investing Analytics showed significant growth in iOS Web share over the past three months. Android's presence, while still substantial, is shrinking.

The study included mobile traffic for 10 of the top 100 mobile websites, including Answers.com, Tumblr, ChaCha, Examiner, LinkedIn, Bleacher Report, Hubpages, White Pages, Squidoo and Dictionary.com.

"For the second straight month in our tracking of the data, iOS gained on Android as a source of mobile traffic," said analyst Gene Munster. "We believe the traffic data continues to demonstrate that iOS is not only the leading platform in the US, its users are generally more engaged with their mobile devices."

In April, Apple's iOS represented 69 percent of mobile traffic from the sites monitored, up 2.6 percent from the March average of 66.4 percent and 3.7 percent from February. Over the same period, Android was the main share loser, dropping from a 29.7 percent share to 26.5 percent.

Munster believes there are three reasons for Apple's dominance in U.S. mobile Web share: the iPhone is the most popular smartphone platform in the U.S.; iOS users are generally more engaged with their devices than their Android counterparts; and the iPad's influence in the tablet marketplace, which is seen to drive more traffic than a smartphone due to a Web-friendly form factor.

Broken down by device, the iPhone slowly ceded its lead to the iPad. For February, Apple's handset accounted for a 61.1 percent share of mobile traffic. By April, however, the iPhone fell to 58.30 percent while the iPad grew to a 41.7 percent average, up from from 38.7 percent.

"We believe that iOS is likely to continue to lead in mobile traffic generation in the US for at least the remainder of the year," Munster said.
post #2 of 90
Quote:

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

According to a report from investment bank Piper Jaffray, Apple's share of the mobile Web is not only dominating Android in the U.S., but has shown growth at the expense of Google's operating system, leading the firm to believe iOS users are generally more engaged with their devices than owners of rival handsets.

 

[...]
 

"We believe that iOS is likely to continue to lead in mobile traffic generation in the US for at least the remainder of the year," Munster said.

 

I am honestly not trying to be a smartass here, but my reaction to this article is "So what?" How does anyone benefit from knowing that the majority of mobile web traffic comes from iOS devices? What does it mean? Why would anyone bother to check?

 

"A new report indicates that Volvo drivers use their cup holders more than Mercedes owners." It seems like an utterly meaningless data point.

post #3 of 90

Well, you don't ride to work on a broken bicycle.

post #4 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

I am honestly not trying to be a smartass here, but my reaction to this article is "So what?" How does anyone benefit from knowing that the majority of mobile web traffic comes from iOS devices? What does it mean? Why would anyone bother to check?

 

"A new report indicates that Volvo drivers use their cup holders more than Mercedes owners." It seems like an utterly meaningless data point.

it is for those who says that apple is doomed....

post #5 of 90

This is not worldwide trend, unfortunately...

post #6 of 90
For developers, it obvouosly has a lot to say whether people use their devices or not. So surveys like these are important, even more so because of all the analytic firms projecting sales/shipping out of the blue without real numbers from other firms than Apple and Nokia.
I would however be a bit careful before I buy these latest web use numbers as representative of the whole of the US. It's based on 10 websites, incuding Linkedin, which I'd say cater to the more educated and "corporate" part of the population. So I'd conclude form this survey that a growing part of the high-income well educated segment are moving towards iOS. Other usage stat firms like StatCounter show a similar trend but less drastic: iOS growing from 52 to 55% the last 3 months, with Android flat on 40%.
post #7 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

I am honestly not trying to be a smartass here, but my reaction to this article is "So what?" How does anyone benefit from knowing that the majority of mobile web traffic comes from iOS devices? What does it mean? Why would anyone bother to check?

"A new report indicates that Volvo drivers use their cup holders more than Mercedes owners." It seems like an utterly meaningless data point.

I have analysed your statement and it appears to contain high amounts of 'GTFOOD" (Get The f@ckOut Of Dodge') elements.

This is bad because it appears you may not have made the correlation between the incredibly, super, awesomely, incredible super-perdackular, (did I mention 'incredible' already?), ridiculously, awesome activation numbers thrown out there by 'Don't Be Evil Unless We Get Caught Being Evil" Google.

It's just a small bit of evidence, but it does make the general population curious why, if Google have the "mega-super-spectacular" majority of activators, why are those individuals not using their devices afterwards?

Small point, but an interesting one none-the-less.
Edited by GTR - 5/7/13 at 2:56am
post #8 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

I have analysed your statement and it appears to contain high amounts of 'GTFOOD" (Get The **** Out Of Dodge') elements.

 

I don't know what that means. I try hard, but sadly I'm just not that bright.

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

It's just a small bit of evidence, but it does make the general population curious why, if Google have the mega-super-spectacular majority of activators, why are those individuals not using their devices afterwards?

 

If we assume it means that Google is inflating their activation figures, my reaction is "So what? Who benefits from knowing how many units Google really has in the wild anyway?"

 

If, on the other hand, we assume it means they really have delivered as many devices as they claim but buyers just aren't using them to visit specific web sites, then my reaction is "So what? Who benefits from Android users visiting more web sites than iOS users or vice-versa?" Number of HITS matters, where they come from is utterly irrelevant.

 

I still don't see how this information is useful to anyone anywhere. ESPECIALLY based on tracking only 10 web sites.

post #9 of 90
Groan...
Edited by GTR - 5/13/13 at 5:13pm
post #10 of 90
I have a hard time drawing any meaningful conclusion from this data. How about all top 100? Does 'web traffic' include access from apps?
post #11 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

I am honestly not trying to be a smartass here, but my reaction to this article is "So what?" How does anyone benefit from knowing that the majority of mobile web traffic comes from iOS devices? What does it mean? Why would anyone bother to check?

 

"A new report indicates that Volvo drivers use their cup holders more than Mercedes owners." It seems like an utterly meaningless data point.

 

Advertisers have billions invested in knowing where to maximize exposure. Clearly, it is best with iOS.

post #12 of 90

so the iPod touch is less than 0.1% of iOS?

 

just did the math on q2 2013 figures.

62% iPhone

33% iPad

5% iPod touch (assuming ~50% of total iPods sold were iPod touch)

 

So I guess of that 5%, the number of iPods that are used to browse the web regularly would probably be pretty insignificant.


Edited by OllieWallieWhiskers - 5/7/13 at 4:25am
post #13 of 90
It would be nice to get a list of what UA strings they're associating with what device.

I ask this because Chrome on my Galaxy Nexus has "Mozilla/5.0(Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_7_3) AppleWebKit/535.19 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/18.0.1025.151 Safari/535.19 as its UA string.

The stock browser UA is very different (Undeniably Android) but if you've got Chrome (50m downloads), why would you use that?

This is ignoring all the other browsers you're not blocked from (and therefore able to) install on Android.
post #14 of 90
"The study included mobile traffic for 10 of the top 100 mobile websites, including Answers.com, Tumblr, ChaCha, Examiner, LinkedIn, Bleacher Report, Hubpages, White Pages, Squidoo and Dictionary.com."

So, I was always curious how they calculate this stuff. I would think android users would be more inclined to use Google than they would any of these websites:
* Answers.com (google search)
* ChaCha (google search)
* Squidoo (google sites)
* Examiner (google news)

So what are these statistics really telling us? That visitors of THESE ten sites... only TEN... show more iOS visitors. Not the whole internet.
post #15 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The study included mobile traffic for 10 of the top 100 mobile websites, including Answers.com, Tumblr, ChaCha, Examiner, LinkedIn, Bleacher Report, Hubpages, White Pages, Squidoo and Dictionary.com.

 

Not only is that a weird selection of websites, but who does not use an app to go to LinkedIn on their phone?  Or apps or widgets for any of those?

 

Quote:
"For the second straight month in our tracking of the data, iOS gained on Android as a source of mobile traffic," said analyst Gene Munster. "We believe the traffic data continues to demonstrate that iOS is not only the leading platform in the US, ...

 

Web usage does not correlate to sales.  

 

Depending on the counting method, it could sometimes relate to how often the browser reloads pages.

 

Quote:
... its users are generally more engaged with their mobile devices."

 

Or it could show that Android users are more likely to use an app or widget than a web browser.

 

That could be because Android has a Back button to make navigating around apps easier by keeping a context trail.   (On iOS the equivalent experience would be using a browser with a Back button, which might explain its popularity as a usage method.)

post #16 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Bray View Post

It would be nice to get a list of what UA strings they're associating with what device.

I ask this because Chrome on my Galaxy Nexus has "Mozilla/5.0(Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_7_3) AppleWebKit/535.19 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/18.0.1025.151 Safari/535.19 as its UA string.

The stock browser UA is very different (Undeniably Android) but if you've got Chrome (50m downloads), why would you use that?

This is ignoring all the other browsers you're not blocked from (and therefore able to) install on Android.
And how many non-geeks actually do this?
post #17 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

 

Advertisers have billions invested in knowing where to maximize exposure. Clearly, it is best with iOS.

That must be why iAds is so successful. Advertisers are more than willing to pay the additional fees that Apple asks to avoid dealing with those poor and ignorant Android owners.1wink.gif

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post #18 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


And how many non-geeks actually do this?

 


Well, I just gave you at least 50m for Chrome. That's only play downloads for presumably the English version.

 

Or to put it another way, a similar amount to the amount that play Angry Birds. Hardly geek-only territory.

post #19 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

I try hard, but sadly I'm just not that bright.

+1 (as Google would say).

post #20 of 90
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Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Not only is that a weird selection of websites, but who does not use an app to go to LinkedIn on their phone?  Or apps or widgets for any of those?

You're right about apps versus websites, but the study does not purport to do the former.

 

In any event, see all the problems that arise with this type of survey-based nonsense that is trotted out, especially when the methodology or validity is never made clear -- like you do every time when you quote Chitika (or whatever the heck they're called) data? (In fact, I am suprised you haven't brought it up yet in this thread).

post #21 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

 

Advertisers have billions invested in knowing where to maximize exposure. Clearly, it is best with iOS.

That must be why iAds is so successful. Advertisers are more than willing to pay the additional fees that Apple asks to avoid dealing with those poor and ignorant Android owners.1wink.gif

Isn't iAds more successful than anything that comes from google (mobile)? 

post #22 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

Isn't iAds more successful than anything that comes from google (mobile)? 

A few articles here at AI have obviously confused some readers. No sir they are not. You've mistaken some statistics that might show Google gets more of their (US?) mobile ad revenue from iOS users than Android as evidence that Apple is more successful than Google in mobile advertising efforts. iAd revenue is reportedly lagging behind Google, Facebook, Pandora, and Twitter, in fact far behind the first two.

 

http://marketingland.com/emarketer-google-to-take-more-than-half-of-mobile-advertising-dollars-but-facebook-will-win-majority-of-mobile-display-market-38937


Edited by Gatorguy - 5/7/13 at 6:18am
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post #23 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

They're visiting NO sites. At all.

If that's the case why isn't web usage 0%?
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post #24 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

And how many non-geeks actually do this?

 

Ah.  He's not talking about changing the user agent.  

 

He's pointing out that stock Chrome says it's "AppleWebKit", which might confuse poor sniffing tools.

 

Likewise, the Kindle Fire's Silk server based browser used to claim that it was a Mac in its user agent string.

 

Neither of these required user intervention for dumber stat counters to get confused.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

That must be why iAds is so successful. Advertisers are more than willing to pay the additional fees that Apple asks to avoid dealing with those poor and ignorant Android owners.1wink.gif

 

Note that iAds is only used inside apps.  Not the web.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

You're right about apps versus websites, but the study does not purport to do the former.

 

In any event, see all the problems that arise with this type of survey-based nonsense that is trotted out, especially when the methodology or validity is never made clear -- like you do every time when you quote Chitika (or whatever the heck they're called) data? (In fact, I am suprised you haven't brought it up yet in this thread).

 

Exactly right. I have consistently said that web view, ad count, and Android Dashboard statistics do not give us any useful figures about sales.

 

Without knowing the exact methodology and the sales data ahead of time, those stats also fail to inform us about usage.  

 

When results don't make any sense, something is obviously askew.  We need more info.  Too bad we don't have app+web use+comm stats from that internal carrier block of code that everyone cried about last year and is now probably removed.


Edited by KDarling - 5/7/13 at 6:53am
post #25 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

I am honestly not trying to be a smartass here, but my reaction to this article is "So what?" How does anyone benefit from knowing that the majority of mobile web traffic comes from iOS devices? What does it mean? Why would anyone bother to check?

 

"A new report indicates that Volvo drivers use their cup holders more than Mercedes owners." It seems like an utterly meaningless data point.

 

You can't be that stupid.

 

- How about webmasters deciding if they should make specific versions of their site for iPhone or iPad users?

- Advertisers deciding where to spend their money.

- Software developers deciding which platform they should bring their new service/App to first?

 

But the most useful by far: shoving facts into the faces of all the losers/haters who refuse to look at evidence and come back with the "Android haz more market sharez" comments.

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post #26 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Bray View Post

It would be nice to get a list of what UA strings they're associating with what device.

I ask this because Chrome on my Galaxy Nexus has "Mozilla/5.0(Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_7_3) AppleWebKit/535.19 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/18.0.1025.151 Safari/535.19 as its UA string.

The stock browser UA is very different (Undeniably Android) but if you've got Chrome (50m downloads), why would you use that?

This is ignoring all the other browsers you're not blocked from (and therefore able to) install on Android.

 

Oh for crying out loud. People still bringing up that user agent crap? What is this, 2010?

 

As I've said before, changing your user agent DOES NOT fool modern analytics software, which looks at device makes & models, not what the browser reports. This is more garbage spewed by Android users who refuse to accept facts or evidence that show most Android users don't actually use their phones.

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post #27 of 90
Originally Posted by Robert Bray View Post
It would be nice to get a list of what UA strings they're associating with what device.

 

No one actually does this, so stop talking about it.

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post #28 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Not only is that a weird selection of websites, but who does not use an app to go to LinkedIn on their phone?  Or apps or widgets for any of those?

 

 

Web usage does not correlate to sales.  

 

Depending on the counting method, it could sometimes relate to how often the browser reloads pages.

 

 

Or it could show that Android users are more likely to use an app or widget than a web browser.

 

That could be because Android has a Back button to make navigating around apps easier by keeping a context trail.   (On iOS the equivalent experience would be using a browser with a Back button, which might explain its popularity as a usage method.)

 

More bull from you-know-who. More Android users are  likely to use an App? You have any evidence to back that up? Oh no, you don't.

 

Nobody said web usage = sales. But it's a great indicator of what people do with their devices. Everyone knows there are boatloads of low-end Android feature phones being sold. The only ones who still haven't figured this out yet are the trolls and haters.

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post #29 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Ah.  He's not talking about changing the user agent.  

 

He's pointing out that stock Chrome says it's "AppleWebKit", which might confuse poor sniffing tools.

 

Likewise, the Kindle Fire's Silk server based browser used to claim that it was a Mac in its user agent string.

 

Neither of these required user intervention for dumber stat counters to get confused.

 

 

Note that iAds is only used inside apps.  Not the web.

 

 

Exactly right. I have consistently said that web view, ad count, and Android Dashboard statistics do not give us any useful figures about sales.

 

Without knowing the exact methodology and the sales data ahead of time, those stats also fail to inform us about usage.  

 

When results don't make any sense, something is obviously askew.  We need more info.  Too bad we don't have app+web use+comm stats from that internal carrier block of code that everyone cried about last year and is now probably removed.

 

Don't make sense? They make perfect sense. Especially when study after study from different companies using different methods of gathering data ALL COME UP WITH THE SAME RESULTS. How ignorant can you be not to see something so obvious?

 

Poor sniffing tools? So now you're claiming the data is bad because they use poor quality analytics? I'll tell you what poor analytics software does - it uses the user agent - something nobody does anymore (though the fandroids seem to think it's still widely used).

 

Do you manage any websites? If so, do what I've suggested numerous times on AI - install Google Analytics. I find it hilarious that a Google tool is telling me that 2/3 of the visitors to my site are using iOS. Google's own tool telling me I should target iOS over Android.

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post #30 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

I am honestly not trying to be a smartass here, but my reaction to this article is "So what?" How does anyone benefit from knowing that the majority of mobile web traffic comes from iOS devices? What does it mean? Why would anyone bother to check?

It gives an indication of how users use their smart phone. Makes you wonder if many Androiders use their androids as just phones/texting. Again this is just one data point.
post #31 of 90

How is the OS checked? When I'm looking this up, all I get is User Agent.

post #32 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

When results don't make any sense, something is obviously askew. 

Sure, that would be the interpretation of Fandroiders, hanging around in Apple forums.

 

For those who are pro-Apple in this forum, the results make perfect sense. It's consistent with the explanation that Android share numbers are badly exaggerated.

post #33 of 90
69% of the web traffic on less than 40%? of the devices out there.
post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

And how many non-geeks actually do this?

 

Ah.  He's not talking about changing the user agent.  

 

He's pointing out that stock Chrome says it's "AppleWebKit", which might confuse poor sniffing tools.

 

 

Actually he is talking about changing the UA string, or perhaps I should say lying about changing it because that is not the default string. This is:

 

Mozilla/5.0(Linux;Android4.0.4;GalaxyNexusBuild/IMM76B)
AppleWebKit/535.19(KHTML, like Gecko)Chrome/18.0.1025.133Mobile
Safari/535.1

https://developers.google.com/chrome/mobile/docs/user-agent

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post #35 of 90

That's the stock browser. Which is also Chrome, but not the one that's explicitly labelled Chrome.
 

post #36 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Bray View Post

That's the stock browser. Which is also Chrome, but not the one that's explicitly labelled Chrome.
 

If that is true and even if it isn't it only proves that Google is a liar when it comes to identifying their browser. The fact that they call themselves Mobile Safari is to get picked up by developers who happen to be looking for just that phrase. Google just wants to be able to access the specific presentations that developers are creating for iOS. If they go so far as to call themselves Intel Mac OS X when actually they are Android, then I find it difficult to understand what is keeping them from calling themselves iPhone - since they steal everything else about iPhone they might as well steal the name too.

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post #37 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

When results don't make any sense, something is obviously askew.  We need more info.

I agree. We need more info about Android activation number.
post #38 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

If that is true and even if it isn't it only proves that Google is a liar when it comes to identifying their browser. The fact that they call themselves Mobile Safari is to get picked up by developers who happen to be looking for just that phrase. Google just wants to be able to access the specific presentations that developers are creating for iOS. If they go so far as to call themselves Intel Mac OS X when actually they are Android, then I find it difficult to understand what is keeping them from calling themselves iPhone - since they steal everything else about iPhone they might as well steal the name too.


That's an interesting rant, but I fail to see the relevance to this topic.

 

Ordinarily, however, an apology for accusing me of being a liar would be forthcoming.

post #39 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Bray View Post

That's an interesting rant, but I fail to see the relevance to this topic.

Okay then you explain why the Chrome UA string is so wrong.

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post #40 of 90
This fits my own observations: a lot of Android phones are low-end AWFUL devices that get no media attention and their users did not seek them out (any may not even know what they have). They're just whatever freebie some carrier used to sell a costly service plan.

I have friends with this kind of Android phone (and some with "real" ones too of course) and they hate using them. Even for basic things like email they hate them. Slow, awkward, tiny screens--plus the usual Android issues like malware, instant abandonment (updates), and poor backup/restore.

This is a win-win for the carrier: they get the income of selling a data plan, AND they don't actually have to deliver much data! And if the person doesn't like their phone, all a salesperson has to do in 2 years is convince them that the next free low-end junk is 2 years better than than the one they hate (which is true)! Or give them a "real" phone. Either way, the carrier can simply blame the bad phone and not lose a customer in future.

Now, there are good reasons to not use a "real" Android phone as much, too. But we forget just how bad low-end Android phones go. (A reminder that any "low-end" iPhone Apple might ever consider will really be mid-range, not low-end at all.)
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