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Samsung testing 5G wireless technology that can download entire movies in seconds

post #1 of 100
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South Korean tech giant Samsung says it has developed a wireless transmission standard hundreds of times faster than today's 4G LTE, one that could see users downloading entire movies in seconds.

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Samsung on Sunday announced that it had developed a core component of its 5G network by solving a problem that has stymied the wireless industry, Yonhap News reported. Using the 28GHz waveband, Samsung says it has achieved download and upload speeds of tens of gigabits per second (Gbps). Current 4G LTE networks top out at around 75 megabits (Mbps).

In practice, that speed would allow wireless users to download a full HD movie in seconds. Samsung executives see the technology enabling a wide range of rich applications.

Samsung used 64 antenna elements in order to accomplish the high-speed data transfer, and said the company expects that it can commercialize the technology by 2020.

That deadline conforms well to a European Commission goal to have 5G wireless technology in place by the same year. China, too, has been pouring funding into next-generation wireless technology, with hopes to roll out such technology around the same time.

Samsung for years has regularly pioneered in the area of wireless transmission technologies. Some of its wireless advances the company has been able to patent, and some of those patents have been used against Apple in the two companies' ongoing litigation struggles. Samsung's wireless patents, though, are typically standard essential, meaning the company must grant licenses in a fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory fashion.

Samsung is not alone in developing next generation wireless technology, nor is its recently announced demonstration the fastest of its kind. NTT DoCoMo in February announced that it had successfully conducted a 10Gbps wireless test in Japan last year using the 11GHz band.

High data transmission rates are a constant goal for wireless carriers as well as mobile device makers. Higher transmission speeds were a major selling point for a number of Android handsets in the years before Apple added 4G connectivity to its iPhone. Upon moving to 4G, customers tend to like the extra speed, but a survey last year found that nearly half of American consumers felt they don't need 4G LTE. Most carriers are still transitioning to 4G technology, and even those with established 4G networks typically must wait until their customers upgrade their devices in order to get them online with the standard.
post #2 of 100
I recall musing on AI a year or two ago that one day the internet will be so fast we will cease even thinking about download speeds just as we didn't when watching an analog TV show in the past, it was 'just there'. We are getting closer.
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post #3 of 100

I can barely think of decent uses for 4G, let alone 5G. My 3G connection streams video adequately, and that's about as data intensive as I need, or will need for in the foreseeable future.

I don't care for downloading video in seconds. As long as I can stream it, and play it immediately, who cares.

post #4 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I recall musing on AI a year or two ago that one day the internet will be so fast we will cease even thinking about download speeds just as we didn't when watching an analog TV show in the past, it was 'just there'. We are getting closer.


We are already there in a sense. You can stream a movie or even download it as you watch it. It's just that most servers aren't that fast.

 

It's good that companies innovate and in the future we are probably going to use this kind of technology, but I don't see how it could change our behaviors on the web radically. Right now, there is no point in having this. I can download a whole HD movie on my cellphone in less than 15 minutes, I don't see how 5G is going to make that radically a better experience. But yes, more speed is welcome nonetheless.

 

ps : wow samsung innovating? that's news.

post #5 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I recall musing on AI a year or two ago that one day the internet will be so fast we will cease even thinking about download speeds just as we didn't when watching an analog TV show in the past, it was 'just there'. We are getting closer.

Perhaps that day will come but remember that with faster downloads we allow ourselves to get larger files. Consider that webpages really don't render instantly despite our internet speeds, and HW and SW engines (like WebCore) have increased by orders of magnitude since we first started using the internet. This is because our webpages are so much larger and more complex complex than they used to be.

Once 5G network speeds get here how much larger will the average video be? Hopefully not that much larger with H.265 allowing us to further decrease the size by about half for a given quality comparison to H.264, but you never know our expectations are moving all the time.

Another thing to consider is that any given bandwidth is shared and with more and more people using the bandwidth the actual throughput will not increase at the same ratio as the bandwidth. This also includes the routing and switching overheard for dealing with more users and more packets and more datagrams on the network, and that's without security overhead which need to be beefed up in the future in order to deal with potential threats.

But besides all that the future looks very bright. 1biggrin.gif (I really didn't mean to start Monday so gloomy)

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post #6 of 100
I see we've morphed in to Samsung insider again. And this article actually reads like a PR piece from Samsung more than anything else.
post #7 of 100

Streaming video quality is still far below Blu-Ray on 3G. It's not really noticeable on a phone screen but I find streaming video to be unwatchable on my iPad on 3G. 

post #8 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I see we've morphed in to Samsung insider again. And this article actually reads like a PR piece from Samsung more than anything else.

Not only what Samsung does affect Apple as a company, but next gen cellular technology directly affects Apple.


PS: If I'm going to discuss non-Apple stories I'd much rather do it on this forum rather than AnandTech, Engadget, The Verge, etc.

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post #9 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I see we've morphed in to Samsung insider again. And this article actually reads like a PR piece from Samsung more than anything else.

 

Well, to be fair, Samsung does spend a lot more time on the underlying communications technology than Apple does. Nobody expects Apple to invent 5G. Samsung is one of the companies that might. Whoever ends up winning that race, Apple will incorporate the technology (eventually). 

post #10 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I can barely think of decent uses for 4G, let alone 5G. My 3G connection streams video adequately, and that's about as data intensive as I need, or will need for in the foreseeable future.

I don't care for downloading video in seconds. As long as I can stream it, and play it immediately, who cares.

 

Faster, more reliable internet connections open up the possibility of new services. Don't think in terms of what's offered today.

post #11 of 100
And of course the 5G technology will be a standard, open to everyone to use for free. /s
post #12 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Perhaps that day will come but remember that with faster downloads we allow ourselves to get larger files. Consider that webpages really don't render instantly despite our internet speeds, and HW and SW engines (like WebCore) have increased by orders of magnitude since we first started using the internet. This is because our webpages are so much larger and more complex complex than they used to be.

Once 5G network speeds get here how much larger will the average video be? Hopefully not that much larger with H.265 allowing us to further decrease the size by about half for a given quality comparison to H.264, but you never know our expectations are moving all the time.

Another thing to consider is that any given bandwidth is shared and with more and more people using the bandwidth the actual throughput will not increase at the same ratio as the bandwidth. This also includes the routing and switching overheard for dealing with more users and more packets and more datagrams on the network, and that's without security overhead which need to be beefed up in the future in order to deal with potential threats.

But besides all that the future looks very bright. 1biggrin.gif (I really didn't mean to start Monday so gloomy)

I guess you illustrate my point well, the penultimate paragraph is all about factors that relate to 'thinking about it'. I am suggesting in a few years there will be a generation that won't even know what you are talking about, even the term 'download' will seem silly to that generation. We are not there yet obviously as everything you say is true but one day to our kids or grand kids, it will all just 'be there' ... 1smile.gif
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post #13 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I can barely think of decent uses for 4G, let alone 5G. My 3G connection streams video adequately, and that's about as data intensive as I need, or will need for in the foreseeable future.

I don't care for downloading video in seconds. As long as I can stream it, and play it immediately, who cares.

So you can't tell the difference between data speed on your local computer and data speed when you're wireless away from home? I noticed a difference upon moving from a hard drive to an SSD. And I certainly can tell when I'm mobile. Imagine if there were no difference.

post #14 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

And of course the 5G technology will be a standard, open to everyone to use for free. /s

I'm hoping Apple are hard at work on 5sG 1wink.gif
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post #15 of 100

Samsung testing 5G wireless technology that can [is said to] download entire movies in seconds.

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #16 of 100
Maybe it's not so much Samsung is testing a way to download an entire movie in seconds, but rather that Samsung is trying to develop a way that their phones don't run out of power in seconds when trying to download a movie¡

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #17 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Not only what Samsung does affect Apple as a company, but next gen cellular technology directly affects Apple.


PS: If I'm going to discuss non-Apple stories I'd much rather do it on this forum rather than AnandTech, Engadget, The Verge, etc.
It's PR from Samsung about technology that might be available in 2020. How is that relevant to Apple in 2013? Is AI that hard up with stuff to fill the pages on their site? Or do they like reporting on Samsung because they know it's good click bait to drive hits to the site?
post #18 of 100
Originally Posted by digital clips View Post
…one day the internet will be so fast we will cease even thinking about download speeds just as we didn't when watching an analog TV show in the past, it was 'just there'. We are getting closer.

 

Good luck with that. By the time we all have hundred Mb/s Internet to our homes, we'll be capped to one hundred megabytes per month.

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post #19 of 100
Consumers are in no hurry to upgrade because the telecoms still cap your data, whats the benefit of being able to blow through you data cap faster?
post #20 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I can barely think of decent uses for 4G, let alone 5G. My 3G connection streams video adequately, and that's about as data intensive as I need, or will need for in the foreseeable future.
I don't care for downloading video in seconds. As long as I can stream it, and play it immediately, who cares.

I remember when 20 years ago my friend said "who the hell needs a 40 Mb hard drive?" With 4K and even 8K on the horizon those speeds will be needed.
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post #21 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

It's PR from Samsung about technology that might be available in 2020. How is that relevant to Apple in 2013? Is AI that hard up with stuff to fill the pages on their site? Or do they like reporting on Samsung because they know it's good click bait to drive hits to the site?

How is today relevant to the future? I suppose we'll just have to wait to find out, which is why I'm glad AI isn't living a bubble. Perhaps this will lead no where or perhaps the Samsung of tomorrow will be what Qualcomm is today. I, for one, am glad I got to read and discuss it here.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #22 of 100

Wow, gigabit wifi would be awesome.  And it would rack up even awesomer overage charges on my data plan, which limits me to 5GB/month.  In fact, even the current 4G LTE connection I've got is too fast, because the damnable autoplay video ads have begun rolling and downloading data faster than I can turn them off. And I'll end up downloading entire youtube videos before I can realize that I am not interested, based upon the first few seconds. These things burn through my monthly data allocation too fast as it is.  Is there a setting in SnowLeopard (or higher) that can throttle my Mac's datastream?  Or is there a 3rd party throttling application that I could install?

 

On this 5G standard, ten seconds of unwanted video = $50 overage charge. Eeeeek!

post #23 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

 

Faster, more reliable internet connections open up the possibility of new services. Don't think in terms of what's offered today.

Like what? I never think of what is offered today, am always thinking of the future (that's what I do for a living).  Sure there will be a certain percentage of people who will have requirement for greater speed. But all the average consumer cares about is video. Adequate speed to stream in high res video is all that most will care for. 

 

You will have iGlasses (and Apple's similar offering) which will no doubt require greater upload speed in the future, due to data storage in the 'cloud', but that's about it. But even still, the main bandwidth hog will be (and will always be) video.

post #24 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

Wow, gigabit wifi would be awesome.

[...]

On this 5G standard, ten seconds of unwanted video = $50 overage charge. Eeeeek!

gibiBIT for the tech v. gibiBYTE for how how iSP charges you, so you'd need to get 80 seconds of unwanted video for your scenario.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #25 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

It's PR from Samsung about technology that might be available in 2020. How is that relevant to Apple in 2013? Is AI that hard up with stuff to fill the pages on their site? Or do they like reporting on Samsung because they know it's good click bait to drive hits to the site?

If you're going to be 5-10 years ahead of the competition then what's going to be available in 2020 is very relevant.
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post #26 of 100
US telephone/cable companies haven't even implemented 4G completely with many still using 3G, and they want to think about 5G? I have relatives from overseas that simply laugh at how much Americans pay for high speed internet and cable, versus what they get in technology and services in return. They get more for 2/3rds less than what we pay, and companies over there are serious about keeping up with implementation, where companies like Samsung will invest in the R&D to take advantage of it.
post #27 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Like what? I never think of what is offered today, am always thinking of the future (that's what I do for a living).  Sure there will be a certain percentage of people who will have requirement for greater speed. But all the average consumer cares about is video. Adequate speed to stream in high res video is all that most will care for. 

You will have iGlasses (and Apple's similar offering) which will no doubt require greater upload speed in the future, due to data storage in the 'cloud', but that's about it. But even still, the main bandwidth hog will be (and will always be) video.

Wouldn't iGlasses most likely be Apple's offering?
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post #28 of 100
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post #29 of 100
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post #31 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I can barely think of decent uses for 4G, let alone 5G. My 3G connection streams video adequately, and that's about as data intensive as I need, or will need for in the foreseeable future.

I don't care for downloading video in seconds. As long as I can stream it, and play it immediately, who cares.

"There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home." -- Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977

post #32 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


I remember when 20 years ago my friend said "who the hell needs a 40 Mb hard drive?" With 4K and even 8K on the horizon those speeds will be needed.

 

Well your friend is stupid! That was obvious. And I have always seen use for increasing data storage and bandwidth... until now.

Incremental updates, and cloud based storage, make local storage almost obsolete (for your average consumer). And streaming high res video is about all that will required from bandwidth (for your average consumer).

 

I keep repeating 'for your average consumer' because this is key. You will always have a small percentage of people who will require vast amounts of bandwidth, for instance a security company with multiple video streams on the go. But again, it's all about the video. Video is and will alway be the number one bandwidth hog. 

post #33 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Good luck with that. By the time we all have hundred Mb/s Internet to our homes, we'll be capped to one hundred megabytes per month.

 

I was just thinking the same thing.  Wireless service needs a new business model: one which isn't funded (extorted) by bandwidth caps and roaming fees, but also not by personal information harvesting and targeted advertising.  Perhaps by hardware sales...

 
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post #34 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmvsm View Post

"There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home." -- Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977

every tech eventually reaches a point where its too good for what most people want and something else takes over

 

gaming graphics cards, home internet, computers, etc

post #35 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmvsm View Post

"There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home." -- Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977

Oh for gods sake, don't tar me with the same brush! Anyone who knows me knows I'm the last person to say such things. 

post #36 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Wouldn't iGlasses most likely be Apple's offering?

Sorry yeah, whatever they call it! 'Google Glasses'  Apple I guess will be iView or something.

post #37 of 100

And how many tens of years will it be before this is implemented in a wide scale. There are many areas of the US still not connected with 3G, let alone 5G depending on what carrier you have. While the technology sounds great, if its expensive as hell then I don't see anyone using it anytime soon. Where I live, if you have anything other than Verizon you're stuck on 2G and I don't live out in the boondocks either. 

 

In my opinion, the US STILL is not ready for high-bandwidth data. Its a challenge to stream videos sometimes on AppleTV. Yes, some of it may be Apple, but it can't always be Apple or some other service. The network bandwidth just isn't there in the US yet. With this 3D thing going on, I'd like to see people stream 3D movies on the fly...see how that works out. I bet it will be a major flop!

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post #38 of 100
Originally Posted by auxio View Post
I was just thinking the same thing.  Wireless service needs a new business model: one which isn't funded (extorted) by bandwidth caps and roaming fees, but also not by personal information harvesting and targeted advertising.  Perhaps by hardware sales...

 

Well, according to some, this is the best way of going forward.

 

Limiting people's use of something is better than building more of something.

 

… M~hmm.

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post #39 of 100
This is gonna call for lots of new devices with incredible battery power right?
post #40 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I can barely think of decent uses for 4G, let alone 5G. My 3G connection streams video adequately, and that's about as data intensive as I need, or will need for in the foreseeable future.

I don't care for downloading video in seconds. As long as I can stream it, and play it immediately, who cares.

 

Without an upgrade to infrastructure, technology stagnates. 

 

You ever hear that (rumored) Bill Gates quote? "640K of memory ought to be enough for anyone."

 

No one's going to develop consumer technologies that require 100mbps Internet connections if those 100mbps connections show no promise of high adoption.

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