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Rumor: Apple to feature sapphire crystal touch home button on 'iPhone 5S' - Page 2

post #41 of 89
A bling home button? Who writes this crap?
post #42 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

A bling home button? Who writes this crap?

 

You're aware of course that sapphire doesn't necessarily mean jewellery, but is often used because it is really clear compared to most glass alternatives (clearer than silicon glass if I recall actually) while being harder and more scratch resistant. The iPhone already uses sapphire glass in the camera casing for this reason.

post #43 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

That home button was an engineering disaster
I am sure you know better!
post #44 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Years ago Mythbusters did an episode on such security. Bypassing the fingerprint scanner, which the vendor said had never been bypassed, was easily bypassed. This super advanced sensors also measured if the finger was alive but licking the finger made of the user's fingerprint was enough to fool the device. I don't know more modern devices measure blood pressure but I bet they can be fooled by simulating the same pressure found in humans (it can't be the same as when the scan was input as this varies) or use whatever method it uses (e.g.: sound, radio, etc.) to mimic the same resistance as with blood within a certain range of pressure. There are just too many technologies that mimic human blood and tissue that I don't think any biometric will be hard to bypass. I bet that any biometric Apple adds will be bypassed in less time than it takes to jailbreak the next iOS version.

I was already wondering what would happen if you put the bleeding end in your mouth, sealed with lips and held with teeth and increased the pressure each second ... then put the thought out of my mind and grabbed my coffee...
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #45 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin 
Concerning the sapphire crystal, it would be good if they could cover the whole front of the phone with it for durability and it would be seamless. One thing I don't like about the physical home button is the inconsistency with the feel. Some buttons are harder to press than others and broken ones make the phone or iPad pretty much unusable. There would have to be a difference in how it's pressed. Swipe left/right could be back/forward (to help with the back button placement), swipe down to go home, swipe up for multi-tasking. Tap-hold can also be home and double-tap can be Siri.

Not that I don't want the whole front of the phone to be sapphire crystal, but you don't want the front to be seamless. Well, you want the home button to be recessed, which would make it far more tricky making the entire front in one piece. This is so you can feel for the button. All that gesture nonsense would be exactly that on a iOS device bezel. The current solution certainly has it's failure rates, and there is perhaps a better solution, but gesturing around the bottom bezel is not it. It's not a good experience and totally unintuitive. Perhaps for now at least, a better engineered, more reliable home button might be the best solution of all. Yes, a home button that doesn't move would basically never fail, but that doesn't mean it's a better user experience in use. It might be a bad experience in use, with accidental presses happening too often, and the lack of a positive click to reinforce the buttons use might make it a terrible idea. Perhaps a sound plus a particular simultaneous vibration might suffice in place of the current button movement plus a physical click? Perhaps, but it doesn't feel like it would. I don't know, this is a deceptively difficult problem to solve. Gestures are not the answer, I know that much.
Edited by Ireland - 5/14/13 at 8:08am
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #46 of 89
The New York mayor is already complaining about high crime on stolen high tech smartphones, and now putting sapphire on it? Apple, one day the Newyorkers will sue you of being a high tech company.
post #47 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

If the home button ceases to be a physical button, this will be the boldest move since the introduction of the iPhone. There's just something inherently satisfying, and confidence inducing, and actually having the button depress. I despise capacitive buttons. If Apple can figure out a way to give a decent amount of feedback while preventing accidental usage, then I agree, it would be an improvement. But the current button is definitely a major part of the iPhone's intuitiveness. 

 

Agree.  I have played with many Android phones and I have never "got" the capacitive buttons.  They are not only horrible to use, I think they qualify as "bad design."

 

It's a separate button but it's is part of a unified assembly containing the screen and almost indistinguishable from it.  It needs to be separate from the screen and easily activated to work but contains no clear visual or tactile clues as to it's location or boundaries and gives no feedback on it's state to the user.  How is that good?  

 

When the iPhone first arrived all the critics were going crazy about how it lacked tactile feedback and how this was such a huge problem.  Yet perversely, these same critics *love* the capacitive buttons on Android devices, because ....?  

 

A good "button" (virtual, physical or otherwise), needs to be: 

 

- easily locatable with defined boundaries

- have "glanceable" state information

- reliable function (do the same thing always)

- give feedback to the user on it's action and it's state.

- be difficult to actuate by mistake

 

The capacitive buttons in Android fail on all of these tests.  

post #48 of 89
It would be interesting if the rumoured MacBook update coming out next month also incorporates this technology.
post #49 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

They used an either an optical or capacitance fingerprint scanner that reads surface-level prints:



The Authentec technology Apple bought reads under the skin:

http://www.fastcompany.com/1843949/apple-buys-fingerprint-sensor-maker-authentec-which-perfected-tech-hospitals-and-prisons

It might be possible to recreate a rubber finger from a fingerprint that can fool that type of scanner but it shouldn't be as simple as the Mythbuster's tests. It doesn't really matter though because important authentication should be combined with a changeable key anyway. The scanner is just a convenient way to unlock the phone. If someone stole the phone, maybe they'd have the equipment to lift prints from the glass and then recreate a finger from it to then unlock the device but it's not likely and by the time they figure it out, the user could possibly do a remote wipe and if the theft was for the phone itself, it's not a big deal - the thief will just wipe the phone.

Passcodes are going to be a thing of the past eventually:

http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/11/paypal-chief-information-security-officer-passwords/

Apple did a very smart thing buying Authentec.

Concerning the sapphire crystal, it would be good if they could cover the whole front of the phone with it for durability and it would be seamless. One thing I don't like about the physical home button is the inconsistency with the feel. Some buttons are harder to press than others and broken ones make the phone or iPad pretty much unusable. There would have to be a difference in how it's pressed. Swipe left/right could be back/forward (to help with the back button placement), swipe down to go home, swipe up for multi-tasking. Tap-hold can also be home and double-tap can be Siri.

As far as the user is concerned, it would behave much like the old button and have instant recognition to turn the device on but it gives them the option to scale down the area it uses up and there should be more room inside the phone as the button doesn't have to be pressed down.

1) Right, but that just means it's better than the old tech, it doesn't mean it's secure, or even more secure today than the older tech was back then because the methods to bypass security methods also evolve.

2) I don't see how a memorized passcode will ever be a thing of the past, especially when the alternative is something that is outside the body. Nothing has proven to be more secure than something you retain in your memory. Having a 2-step authentication where you incorporate a biometric and a passcode have their place, but biometrics alone have yet to come close to proving themselves for truly secure environments.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #50 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunlo View Post

The New York mayor is already complaining about high crime on stolen high tech smartphones, and now putting sapphire on it? Apple, one day the Newyorkers will sue you of being a high tech company.

Apple is not responsible for societies crimes. I detest this polical thinking. Perhaps the fucking mayor should solve his own crime problems and quit diverting blame.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #51 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1983 View Post

It would be interesting if the rumoured MacBook update coming out next month also incorporates this technology.

Perhaps next year. Perhaps. We'll (and Apple) see how it goes for iPhone and iPad first.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #52 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

If the home button ceases to be a physical button, this will be the boldest move since the introduction of the iPhone. There's just something inherently satisfying, and confidence inducing, and actually having the button depress. I despise capacitive buttons. If Apple can figure out a way to give a decent amount of feedback while preventing accidental usage, then I agree, it would be an improvement. But the current button is definitely a major part of the iPhone's intuitiveness. 

Couldn't have said it better.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #53 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) Right, but that just means it's better than the old tech, it doesn't mean it's secure, or even more secure today than the older tech was back then because the methods to bypass security methods also evolve.

2) I don't see how a memorized passcode will ever be a thing of the past, especially when the alternative is something that is outside the body. Nothing has proven to be more secure than something you retain in your memory. Having a 2-step authentication where you incorporate a biometric and a passcode have their place, but biometrics alone have yet to come close to proving themselves for truly secure environments.

Huh ? Being better in security can also mean more secure of course, unless you already decided in your mind that it won't be secure for whatever personal reason. The example you quoted applies to other technologies. Those same tricks don't apply here.

As for pass code becoming obsolete, it will likely take a long time to do so. Perhaps never because updating software, especially security software takes time and $$$$$.

Nothing in the fingerprinting technologies exclude multi-factor authentication. In fact, the sensor itself should already consider multiple factors in your fingers. But app developers can also throw in a camera shot, security question, etc. to further strengthen their security needs.
post #54 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Barriault View Post

I just can't see the physical home button going away, as while the mechanism can certainly be improved, physical buttons are so much more reliable than capacitive buttons when it comes to feel. I do like the use of sapphire crystal though, would definitely give it a signature feel, and a fingerprint sensor is a very secure, proven reliable form of security (especially when compared to facial recognition).


I agree with you.  I think having a home button is an ideal, "high end" solution and they should simply try to make improvements to the mechanical technology as time goes by, or offer support for it if it is indeed a huge problem for so many people. 

 

So many people want "touch" everything, and I don't necessarily see "touch" as an improvement.  What a physical home button allows you to do at a functional level is pass your finger over it or rest it there without having to worry that you're going to activate it.  It's the same as typing on a qwerty keyboard using a proper "home key" method.  I type about 90wpm but couldn't possibly do this on a keyboard that I couldn't rest my fingers on.  There are a few, but objective, advantages to mechanical buttons.  I'm not sure how you'd mimic the "touch but don't activate" utility of a physical button.  Coding a delay would be annoying because when I Want to activate the home button, there IS no delay, so creating a software delay would be frustrating. 

 

At the end of the day, I see some mechanical processes as being inherently better than "touch," and consider them "high end."  Sure, touch makes the screen look less busy, but there is a wonderful utility that is lost.  I'm willing to buy apple care for longer to protect myself if I have to, but I respect that some people have had trouble and would prefer a touch solution.  Frankly, though, the home button, when it works, is, in my eyes, the best way to navigate to a homescreen on any device, and it is higher quality than Samsung's.

post #55 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post

Huh ? Being better in security can also mean more secure of course, unless you already decided in your mind that it won't be secure for whatever personal reason. The example you quoted applies to other technologies. Those same tricks don't apply here.

As for pass code becoming obsolete, it will likely take a long time to do so. Perhaps never because updating software, especially security software takes time and $$$$$.

Nothing in the fingerprinting technologies exclude multi-factor authentication. In fact, the sensor itself should already consider multiple factors in your fingers. But app developers can also throw in a camera shot, security question, etc. to further strengthen their security needs.

Of course better means more. The problem is you're comparing it to a tech if you are comparing it to a tech on the market that is a decade old that only means it's better than the old tech, but does not mean it's secure by today's standards. For example, WEP is better than no security but it's easily hacked with freely available methods. Why would you use that when there is WPA2 available? If one can bypass a biometric with today's tech then why trust that without the use of something that would need brute force or social engineering to bypass? Are you willing to trade in your PIN number for a fingerprint reader at the ATM? I'm not! I'd be willing to allow my phone or a fingerprint reader allow me access to my car, but things I actually care about I want something that actually private, not something I'm leaving all over the damn place.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #56 of 89
Any possibility of this making it into ipad this year?
post #57 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Of course better means more. The problem is you're comparing it to a tech if you are comparing it to a tech on the market that is a decade old that only means it's better than the old tech, but does not mean it's secure by today's standards. For example, WEP is better than no security but it's easily hacked with freely available methods. Why would you use that when there is WPA2 available? If one can bypass a biometric with today's tech then why trust that without the use of something that would need brute force or social engineering to bypass? Are you willing to trade in your PIN number for a fingerprint reader at the ATM? I'm not! I'd be willing to allow my phone or a fingerprint reader allow me access to my car, but things I actually care about I want something that actually private, not something I'm leaving all over the damn place.

Why would you need to trade pin for fingerprinting ? Why can't the ATM machine detect my fingerprint while I key in my pin ? Why can't fingerprint replace your ATM card instead ?

It also depends on your app:
e.g., For simple balance checking, a fingerprint may be secure enough. Your mileage may vary.

I don't think we need to dismiss the technology so early. WPA and what not are completely different tech. I don't think one can generalize from there before the fact.
post #58 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogJack View Post

"...Well-connected analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said..."

 

I hope for poor Ming's sake that he gets most of his predictions right because otherwise he's going to have to lose his ubiquitous trademark 'well connected' epithet.

He's often referred to as "noted analyst" as well, in AI articles.

 

I've repeatedly asked what claim this Ming-chi Kuo guy (gal?) has to being well-connected or noted, and I've never got an answer.....

post #59 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post

Why would you need to trade pin for fingerprinting ? Why can't the ATM machine detect my fingerprint while I key in my pin ? Why can't fingerprint replace your ATM card instead ?

if a biometric replaces a card it's not security that's the value, but convenience. The best biometrics can offer so far are in increase to security when added to other secure features. Biometrics are not nor never have been a good form of security in and of themselves, which is the premise of the "but it measures the ridges in your finger and blood pressure, and heart rate yada yada yada" comments. Don't allow yourself to get a false sense of protection because you think you're the only one who access to your biometric signature. Remember, it's not measuring you, but what it reads off of you.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #60 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

if a biometric replaces a card it's not security that's the value, but convenience. The best biometrics can offer so far are in increase to security when added to other secure features. Biometrics are not nor never have been a good form of security in and of themselves, which is the premise of the "but it measures the ridges in your finger and blood pressure, and heart rate yada yada yada" comments. Don't allow yourself to get a false sense of protection because you think you're the only one who access to your biometric signature. Remember, it's not measuring you, but what it reads off of you.

Nope. At the end of the day, it is the total package that count. Security and convenience can come together. e.g., For the sake of convenience, people write down their pass code on a piece of paper. That weakens the security.

In general, security is a function of what you want to protect vs the cost of implementation ( in terms of convenience, money, effort, etc ).

A biometric fingerprinting technology should be a valuable addition to the arsenal, if implemented well. It can indeed be more secure than the status quo.

I hate it when my son peek over my shoulder and discover my pass lock. At the minimal, the default fingerprint unlock should sidestep this problem for me. The rest will depend on the app developers. I can see it being used as the confirmation step for a multi-factor authentication and authorization workflow too.
post #61 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

the home button should go away for the same reason that the keyboard needed to go. It is useless mod of the time.

 

Give the same functionality to the power button or something to have a safe way out, but eliminate that and cram a bigger screen on it.

 

Contrary. As I have posted before, the home button could easily become a touch sensitive input device allowing scrolling, zoom in and out, as well as other gestures. I say this being that your thumb is nearer to the home button than the rest of the screen, it would be easier to scroll page text, zoom in and out for the camera, swipe side to side for content change (as you do now on the screen). 

 

This would then also save the screen from being touched as often and therefore less fingerprints. 

post #62 of 89

Exactly.. It really depends on the technology. the old style optical finger print sensors are garbage, the newer ones that utilize infrared/capacitance technology that can detect sub-surface blood vessels, etc can be very reliable and secure. I'm sure Apple will use cutting edge technology...
 

post #63 of 89
What if I sleep and someone have my finger scanned to the iPhone ?? Well it work??
post #64 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by omair View Post

Any possibility of this making it into ipad this year?

If it makes it into the new iPhone it'll very likely be in the new iPad.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #65 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by imKj View Post

What if I sleep and someone have my finger scanned to the iPhone ?? Well it work??

If you're that paranoid you could just turn off the feature.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #66 of 89
Or use both pin and fingerprint. You'll need to tap the Home button to access the pin dialog anyway.
post #67 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

If you're that paranoid you could just turn off the feature.
That's so secure ...thanks Mr. Jony ive
post #68 of 89
Originally Posted by imKj View Post
That's so secure ...thanks Mr. Jony ive

 

Your fears are ludicrous, so your sarcasm is unnecessary.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #69 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Nah, it will just be synthetic/industrial sapphire, not the kind a girl wears.
I assume the same as on iPhone 5 camera lens.
post #70 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Blood pressure too eh? Clever. So .... cutting off a finger won't work then! So much for all the TV shows and films that do that then. I just hope the street gangs know this fact. 1biggrin.gif

If this does happen, how long before the Scamsung paid shills start pressing their fingers too hard then?

No cutting off a finger wont work.  If you go to Authentec's website they explain that the sensor has to have live tissue to work, because it scans the surface of the skin as well as below the skin.  It cant be fooled by a dead finger or gelatine

 

It is indeed a true biometric sensor.  The tech behind is is really pretty cool.

post #71 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post

No cutting off a finger wont work.  If you go to Authentec's website they explain that the sensor has to have live tissue to work, because it scans the surface of the skin as well as below the skin.  It cant be fooled by a dead finger or gelatine

It is indeed a true biometric sensor.  The tech behind is is really pretty cool.

A severed digit still has tissue. If you reduce it to the phalanx, sure, then it's just bone. They do have measures to attempt to make sure it's an actual finger but this is nothing new and to say "it can't fooled" is like saying the Titanic can't be sunk.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #72 of 89
Then again, to say that it is not more secure than the status quo is like saying Titanic is no bigger than a regular boat. *If* they include the feature, then it is something new for us.

In security, every bit of improvement counts when used in a proper way.

One can argue that technologies are subjected to misuse. As in Titanic sank partly because of a series of operator errors. That doesn't mean the tech was not a good step forward.
post #73 of 89
5S%u2026 what a stupid name considering how much it cheapens the brand. Call it iPhone 6 and make people buy it!
post #74 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by imKj View Post

What if I sleep and someone have my finger scanned to the iPhone ?? Well it work??
If someone has use of your finger while you sleep, you have more security issues than just "someone is using my iPhone". Think about what you said. If someone you don't trust has access to your physical person while you sleep, you just might not wake up.

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

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We've always been at war with Eastasia...

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post #75 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post


If someone has use of your finger while you sleep, you have more security issues than just "someone is using my iPhone". Think about what you said. If someone you don't trust has access to your physical person while you sleep, you just might not wake up.

 

Or it could simply be one of your college roommates thinking it'd be fun to share your personal photos and email with everyone else in the dorm :)

 

(Thinking back to some of the similar immature pranks we pulled in college listening in on phone lines, hiding shaving cream on objects, putting sleeping hands in warm water, etc.)

post #76 of 89

It is not difficult to take a video of your roommate or family member typing his/her password too. As I mentioned above, my son is pretty good at guessing my pin code after watching me for a few months. 

 

If it's important enough, use privacy screen, pin code and fingerprinting. Some people don't even use a lock screen code on their phone. So your mileage will definitely vary.

 

Without fingerprinting, they don't have to grab your finger physically to get into your phone. If it's used for online services, it's at least an additional physical barrier to cross; not just password guessing or phishing.

post #77 of 89
Originally Posted by bighype View Post
5S%u2026 what a stupid name considering how much it cheapens the brand.

 

In what conceivable way does that name 'cheapen the brand'? I'll wait. You won't answer.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #78 of 89

Back to the sapphire button.  I was thinking about it this morning.

 

Synthetic sapphire cannot be molded, it has to be grown for days and then cut.  A concave shape would be relatively costly and a waste of material.  

 

On the other hand, it would be pretty cool marketing-wise.  A sapphire under your finger!

 

Then I wondered about its electrical properties.  Is it a good choice for capacitive touch?  As it turns out, it's fine. There's even a smartphone that actually has its entire screen covered in sapphire:  the $10,000 titanium and leather Android based Vertu Ti.  (It's a Vertu, what do you expect?)

post #79 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Back to the sapphire button.  I was thinking about it this morning.

Synthetic sapphire cannot be molded, it has to be grown for days and then cut.  A concave shape would be relatively costly and a waste of material.  


On the other hand, it would be pretty cool marketing-wise.  A sapphire under your finger!


Then I wondered about its electrical properties.  Is it a good choice for capacitive touch?  As it turns out, it's fine. There's even a smartphone that actually has its entire screen covered in sapphire:  the $10,000 titanium and leather Android based 
Vertu Ti
.  (It's a Vertu, what do you expect?)

This was rumoured for future Apple products just a couple months ago.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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post #80 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


This was rumoured for future Apple products just a couple months ago.

 

Thanks.  I also ran across this very informational video about how the sapphire is made, and how much it would cost to use on a smartphone (currently $30, in mass production perhaps $10-$15... versus $3 for Gorilla Glass).

 

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