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Cook: US-built Mac will be refreshed version of existing product - Page 2

post #41 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plagen View Post


Since 97% of Google's revenue comes from advertising, those mysterious producst must belong to the remaining 3%. Their main product is you doing a search and then clicking on the top line search result. Usually it's Amazon or Home Depot, or Walmart.

 

The number of people who seem not to understand that Google is an advertising company astonishes me.

post #42 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by 512ke View Post

I rip on Apple for a lack of new products and services when compared to Google and Android over the past year or so.

 

I was going to list everything that's wrong with that statement, but it would be quicker to list everything right with that statement:

 

1.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #43 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Really. What 'new' products and services from Google and Android?

 

Every activation = new product. lol.gif

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #44 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufwa View Post

He actually said "...where the company will begin producing a new version of a current Mac product later this year."

 

Upgrading the cpu and gpu would still fall under the vague description of "new version"

 

cpu/gpu refresh in imac ,mac mini, macbooks to a new mac pro design would qualify under his statement.

 

So... no hope for the Newton making a comeback?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #45 of 214
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
So... no hope for the Newton making a comeback?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #46 of 214

I just don't see Apple moving in the direction that building a new Mac Pro factory would require. Expandable/upgradeable devices are no longer part of their business model, they're trying to go Intel-free and they've been "trimming the fat" on low-profit product lines by streamlining their product catalogue.

 

While i'd personally love to see a new Mac Pro and I agree that due to shipping weight it would make some sense to assemble them in the USA (although its probably cheaper to ship to Europe from China), i just don't see this happening.

 

Maybe the product in question will be a refreshed Cinema display?

post #47 of 214
NeXT was fully automated with just a handful of staff to keep the system stamping and assembling pizza boxes and cubes.
post #48 of 214
I think it's great that Apple's binging the flag-ship (if it is the Mac Pro) back home. Also hope it's a real PC-eating beast!
post #49 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

NeXT was fully automated with just a handful of staff to keep the system stamping and assembling pizza boxes and cubes.

And I thought only Tony Stark had robots to build his flying suits in his home lab...

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #50 of 214
Probably a good excuse to make the argument for a tax holiday for Apple. Showing the govt that they're serious about spending the money back in the USA.
post #51 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkKnot View Post

Probably a good excuse to make the argument for a tax holiday for Apple. Showing the govt that they're serious about spending the money back in the USA.


Do you recall the 2004 failure based on the same mentality?

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203633104576623771022129888.html

 

Even the heritage foundation  doesn't like it.

 

 

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/10/would-another-repatriation-tax-holiday-create-jobs

 

 

Quote:
The current proposal would cut taxes, which is generally a good thing, but if another repatriation tax holiday were enacted, one should expect a similar result as last time: specifically, a surge in repatriations and little appreciable increase in domestic investment or job creation. The repatriation holiday would have little or no effect on investment and job creation, the key to the whole issue, simply because the repatriating companies are not capital-constrained today. Any investment, any action that they would deem worthwhile today can be and is being financed by current and accumulated earnings. For those rare instances in which outside financing is needed, interest rates remain at historic lows and few if any of these repatriating companies are constrained. Adding to their financing abilities will not increase the opportunities for investment.

 

 

It just takes current problems and kicks them further out.

post #52 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by NIZZARD View Post

wonderful. can i expect my macbooks to prematurely fall apart and randomly stop working now?

Apple recently return 500,000 iPhones to the manufacturer because they were not assembled to high enough standards, and they will surely do the same for any manufacturer no matter where they're based. This is not Apple assembling themselves, remember, it's just a US based subcontractor. Probably still Foxconn.

post #53 of 214

I wonder if Tim Cook will do the WWDC keynote and reveal the whole story then?

post #54 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by NIZZARD View Post

wonderful. can i expect my macbooks to prematurely fall apart and randomly stop working now?

-1
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

NeXT had US assembly. There is a video of the plant somewhere online but I can't seem to locate it.

This one? (warning: long hair alert)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by 512ke View Post

I think it's great Apple is bringing manufacturing back to the USA.  Kudos.

I rip on Apple for a lack of new products and services when compared to Google and Android over the past year or so.

When we need them, they will come….

Trolls. When you don't need them they'll come.
Quote:
Originally Posted by enzos View Post

I think it's great that Apple's binging the flag-ship (if it is the Mac Pro) back home. Also hope it's a real PC-eating beast!

Probably not, if history is any indication. It usually is 'the same' as PeeCee's Workstations. Price wise it's also roughly the same. But, like Steve said at AllThingsD: "It's all in the software"

Besides, I like the Apple design of the Power Mac, nee, Mac Pro. Dell Workstation, not so much.
post #55 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

[...] Aside from the RAM, it's unlikely one would need to do anything else internally anyway...

 

Actually, I'd be willing to bet that most people never upgrade their RAM after the initial purchase. They might add some when they first buy it, but not after that.

 

DRIVES, on the other hand, are frequently replaced around here, partly due to failures and partly for increased capacity. Making them hard to get at and/or unique to specific models is what bugs me. It takes away the opportunity for klutzes like me to take advantage of the economies of scale that result in popular drives popping up at really attractive prices. Our most recent Mac purchase was the "old" style MacBook Pro, not the Retina version, so swapping is easy and we're not stuck with the extremely limited storage options available for the Retina.

post #56 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Yes, Jony Ive has his work cut out for him doesn't he?

I mean, revamping a UI is one thing but to get it to look as invisible as Key Lime Pie was at Google I/O will be a monumental task.

And how fricking thin was the new Nexus 5?

When you turn that thing sideways you almost couldn't see it!

Actually, come to think of it, when you turned it to the front it was also pretty hard to see...
Actually Google is pretty clever. They could have served up dog shit on a plate at I/O and the media/tech press/wall street would have eaten it up. They're saving new Android OS and Nexus devices for the fall, no doubt to compete with iPhones/iPads/whatever else from Apple.
post #57 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plagen View Post

Since 97% of Google's revenue comes from advertising, those mysterious producst must belong to the remaining 3%. Their main product is you doing a search and then clicking on the top line search result. Usually it's Amazon or Home Depot, or Walmart.
Or Wikipedia.
post #58 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

The cost of the Mac Pro is why I think it's the likely candidate. They can more easily hide the assembly costs in the Mac Pro than they can in less expensive Macs.
True, but the assembly cost of a Mini wouldn't be that great, especially with a bit of design effort. Beyond that the Mini already lends itself to mass production with its die cast housing. Optimize it a bit more and the whole thing could go together with a minimum of human contact.
Quote:
I hope they have made it highly automated so that they can not only reduce costs but also expand into other products down the line, but that seems unlikely at this point.

Actually I think it is very likely. It would simply lead to more efficient use of resources. The Mac Pro is a good place to ramp up a factory and supply chain due to its lower volume. I can see two or three products being made in this country by 2015.

Years ago I worked in the die cast industry, in that case Zinc diecasting, and imagine that you could pump out Mini like enclosures probably every 15 seconds, maybe faster from one machine. Automate the process so that the enclosures get trimmed and secondary processing on an automated line and the raw enclosure might never be touched by human hands. The idea intrigues me even though I left that industry 30 years ago. Take some cues from the high speed packaging industry and the motherboard could be loaded into the enclosure in seconds.

In any event unlike the Mac Pro, the Mini lends itself to much innovation in assembly. I'm really leaning towards the Mac Pro as the USA built machine, but see interesting possibilities with the Mini. The Mini is simply an easy platform to redesign for automation.
post #59 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

I also think the most likely candidate for this 'new version of an existing product' is the Mac Pro. 

In every way it makes sense. Lower volume, lower cost to ship/build BTO units (which most Mac Pros are), and a slower ramp to get manufacturing up to speed.
Due to its nature it is also a labor intensive product. So while I lean towards the Mac Pro as the machine I still see potential in the Mini being the product.
Quote:
Investing only $100 million doesn't imply a very large scale ramp either, so if it's a product requiring high output in a quarter, it would cost more to put in place, one would think...
Actually it could be a significant factory with one or possibly two production lines. Much of the sub component production would be picked up by subcontractors. For example a PCB manufacture only has to be able to produce the volume required and might not have to invest heavily in capital. Like wise enclosure manufacture could be handled by a subcontractor with a minimal of hardware investment.

I'd be the first to admit that costs on production lines add up quick, but I've also spent years working on similar lines. I can easily see one or two Mini assembly lines being built for that sort of money. I'm also imagining that the various revs to the machine (be it Min or Mac Pro) each year come out of a different budget.

In the end it really depends upon what they are talking about. 100 million isn't a lot, if the factory is expected to do everything itself but I don't think they will go that route.
post #60 of 214

This move does not fill me with confidence… Most American made products I have owned or used were pretty poor in terms of build quality, like Italian made goods but not so stylish.

 

Every time I visit the US I come away feeling that for Americans price beats quality and everything IS cheap! Although there is obviously tremendous pride in American made products they seem old-fashioned and inefficient compared to what the rest of the world uses. Perhaps I generalise but I can't think of a single American made item that sells well in Europe because they are generally perceived as not being very good.

 

Amongst visible American companies that do well Apple products seem to be an exception in that they are viewed as stylish and well made but the only other visible US high-street presences that jump to mind are Starbucks and fast food outlets. Even McD claim to sell 100% Swiss/French/British Beef/Wheat/Lettice (in their respective markets) because no one particularly wants to eat US grown produce as it is viewed as drug laden GM/Frankenstein food.

 

I wouldn't be surprised if people over here would plump for the Made in China version given the choice.

post #61 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

People do love moaning incessantly about Apple's design decisions… don't like it, don't buy it?
We don't buy it. Beyond that it is always important to offer a manufacture your opinions. Sometimes they see the error of their ways like with the VESA mount.
Quote:
But this may work for you, a new Mac Pro is coming that will likely allow you to 'customize' it to your liking… wait for it, and buy that one. The "all in one" iMac is what it is (and pretty extraordinary in my view). Personally I have no issue with it missing an optical drive, or not allowing end-user repairs and internal upgrades. Aside from the RAM, it's unlikely one would need to do anything else internally anyway...

This is garbage! I've had far more problems over the years with hard drives than anything else.
post #62 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkKnot View Post

Probably a good excuse to make the argument for a tax holiday for Apple. Showing the govt that they're serious about spending the money back in the USA.

These corporations don't need a tax holiday. What the need is a rational tax rate. Especially when those foreign incomes have already been taxed overseas. 35% is just stupid as you want American companies to be successful outside of the US.
post #63 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Probably not, if history is any indication. It usually is 'the same' as PeeCee's Workstations. Price wise it's also roughly the same. But, like Steve said at AllThingsD: "It's all in the software"
I've been thinking a lot about the possibilities here, I still see major changes for the Mac Pro. Honestly why would you continue a product direction that has basically failed? The question is which direction does Apple go.
Quote:
Besides, I like the Apple design of the Power Mac, nee, Mac Pro. Dell Workstation, not so much.

So? Does this mean you would be incapable of liking anything else Apple makes that might replace the Pro?

I look at it this way, technology has drastically changed Apples laptop line up and even the iMac. It is about time for a technology overhaul of the desktop line up.
post #64 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

DRIVES, on the other hand, are frequently replaced around here, partly due to failures and partly for increased capacity.

Tell me about it; I just bought another 3TB HDD to replace a smaller one. When I put the old one in a drawer I was surprised to see 8 older HDD's. Still functional, but small on capacity.
post #65 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Probably not, if history is any indication. It usually is 'the same' as PeeCee's Workstations. Price wise it's also roughly the same. But, like Steve said at AllThingsD: "It's all in the software"
I've been thinking a lot about the possibilities here, I still see major changes for the Mac Pro. Honestly why would you continue a product direction that has basically failed? The question is which direction does Apple go.
Quote:
Besides, I like the Apple design of the Power Mac, nee, Mac Pro. Dell Workstation, not so much.

So? Does this mean you would be incapable of liking anything else Apple makes that might replace the Pro?

I look at it this way, technology has drastically changed Apples laptop line up and even the iMac. It is about time for a technology overhaul of the desktop line up.

You think the MP was a failure? That might be true in terms of numbers sold, profits maybe as well. But still, I don't think the MP as a computer has failed; all owners I know are very happy with it. A friend of mine bought a new one earlier this year, he didn't mind 'all the shortcomings' I've read here. He just needed a new one as his current one died. So he couldn't wait for a new model.


2. Yes I can like a change of the MP, once revealed. But right now I have all my older ones, all lined up, looking like a museum. Silly, I know. But an overhaul of the desktop line is of course limited to what's available on the market. Theoretically they could design and build their own CPU/GPU, but I don't think that'll happen as they've always tried to improve on the things competitors were doing and understanding that they shouldn't try 'to do it all themselves'.
post #66 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by igamogam View Post

This move does not fill me with confidence… Most American made products I have owned or used were pretty poor in terms of build quality, like Italian made goods but not so stylish.
Which of course is complete bull shit!
Quote:
Every time I visit the US I come away feeling that for Americans price beats quality and everything IS cheap!
There is no logical reason to pay high prices just for the sake of high prices. This is one thing that has always bothered me about Europe, people there equate high prices with quality when the two aren't linked at all.
Quote:
Although there is obviously tremendous pride in American made products they seem old-fashioned and inefficient compared to what the rest of the world uses. Perhaps I generalise but I can't think of a single American made item that sells well in Europe because they are generally perceived as not being very good.
That is your personal bias coming through and frankly is one of considerable ignorance. The biggest problem American companies have in Europe is protectionism and irrational regulation. In many cases it isn't a market worth bothering with.
Quote:
Amongst visible American companies that do well Apple products seem to be an exception in that they are viewed as stylish and well made
Another common problem in Europe is the need to be stylish.
Quote:
but the only other visible US high-street presences that jump to mind are Starbucks and fast food outlets. Even McD claim to sell 100% Swiss/French/British Beef/Wheat/Lettice (in their respective markets) because no one particularly wants to eat US grown produce as it is viewed as drug laden GM/Frankenstein food.
No you guys prefer horse meat when it is called beef.

As to the food we grow it is perfectly fine and is yet another example of endemic ignorance in Europe. Anything that is truly new gets rejected out of hand, without a bit of rational support for that rejection. The fact is humans have been modifying their food chain for centuries now, things have advanced recently to make these mutations more predictable but that is all it really is.
Quote:
I wouldn't be surprised if people over here would plump for the Made in China version given the choice.
Again it would be yet another example of European ignorance. In this case making buying decisions based upon bias, often based on distorted images of the USA.
post #67 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

You think the MP was a failure? That might be true in terms of numbers sold, profits maybe as well. But still, I don't think the MP as a computer has failed; all owners I know are very happy with it. A friend of mine bought a new one earlier this year, he didn't mind 'all the shortcomings' I've read here. He just needed a new one as his current one died. So he couldn't wait for a new model.
It is a failure in the sense that sales have been so bad that Apple has considered canceling the machine completely. It is also a failure in respect to keeping up with technology. The current Mac Pro is very old technology.
Quote:

2. Yes I can like a change of the MP, once revealed. But right now I have all my older ones, all lined up, looking like a museum. Silly, I know.
Yes a bit silly. Don't you get frustrated with the wasted space?
Quote:
But an overhaul of the desktop line is of course limited to what's available on the market. Theoretically they could design and build their own CPU/GPU, but I don't think that'll happen as they've always tried to improve on the things competitors were doing and understanding that they shouldn't try 'to do it all themselves'.

In the case of the Mac Pro I suspect it will remain Intel for a long time. However Intel has a lot of interesting things in the labs that could really make for an interesting Mac Pro revision. I don't see Apple dropping i86, in some form, in its Macs. If they where to go to ARM it would be in separate products.
post #68 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by eji View Post

I'd like to see a USA-made iMac that isn't glued together and allows user access to basic components like the fans and HDD. Even if it meant adding another 1 or (gasp!) 2mm to its side profile. Because sometimes the quest for thinness can lead down the path to absurdity.

And sometimes the endless criticism from people who don't know what they're talking about gets even more absurd.

There are many reasons for Apple's design decisions. They consider cost. They consider the number of people who ever actually upgrade a given model. They consider heat. They consider performance. They consider ease of assembly. They consider durability. They consider about 1,000 other factors.

Apple felt that the tradeoffs between durability and upgradeability favored the current design. If you disagree, go ahead and start your own company and make computers that compete with Apple.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #69 of 214

@jragosta

What an arrogant rant!

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by echosonic View Post

In addition, I am pretty certain that more than half of all Mac Pros are already bought and used in the US.  

 

That's easy.

Sold units in the EU: Zero


Edited by smalM - 5/17/13 at 4:41am
post #70 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Tell me about it; I just bought another 3TB HDD to replace a smaller one. When I put the old one in a drawer I was surprised to see 8 older HDD's. Still functional, but small on capacity.

But with Thunderbolt, that's less of an issue. You can easily add a second hard drive that's every bit as fast as the internal one. PLUS, it's easy to take it with you when you switch to a different computer.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #71 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

You think the MP was a failure? That might be true in terms of numbers sold, profits maybe as well. But still, I don't think the MP as a computer has failed; all owners I know are very happy with it. A friend of mine bought a new one earlier this year, he didn't mind 'all the shortcomings' I've read here. He just needed a new one as his current one died. So he couldn't wait for a new model.
It is a failure in the sense that sales have been so bad that Apple has considered canceling the machine completely. It is also a failure in respect to keeping up with technology. The current Mac Pro is very old technology.

I'm not up to speed on what's available for CPU's. The GPU I know is outdated, and not seeing a refresh for such a long time is indeed strange. Though I do believe Apple thinks that people who need some superduper GPU will buy their own, whatever they put in the MP. Supposedly there isn't a CPU worthy of yet another speed bumped Mac Pro.
Quote:
Quote:

2. Yes I can like a change of the MP, once revealed. But right now I have all my older ones, all lined up, looking like a museum. Silly, I know.
Yes a bit silly. Don't you get frustrated with the wasted space?

I actually put them all again my kitchen wall, beneath shelves. Some friends don't even notice them instantly.
Quote:
Quote:
But an overhaul of the desktop line is of course limited to what's available on the market. Theoretically they could design and build their own CPU/GPU, but I don't think that'll happen as they've always tried to improve on the things competitors were doing and understanding that they shouldn't try 'to do it all themselves'.

In the case of the Mac Pro I suspect it will remain Intel for a long time. However Intel has a lot of interesting things in the labs that could really make for an interesting Mac Pro revision. I don't see Apple dropping i86, in some form, in its Macs. If they where to go to ARM it would be in separate products.

1. Good point.
2. Hmm, a separate product line, with ARM. Something to think about.
post #72 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by eji View Post

I'd like to see a USA-made iMac that isn't glued together and allows user access to basic components like the fans and HDD. Even if it meant adding another 1 or (gasp!) 2mm to its side profile. Because sometimes the quest for thinness can lead down the path to absurdity.

And sometimes the endless criticism from people who don't know what they're talking about gets even more absurd.

There are many reasons for Apple's design decisions. They consider cost. They consider the number of people who ever actually upgrade a given model. They consider heat. They consider performance. They consider ease of assembly. They consider durability. They consider about 1,000 other factors.

Apple felt that the tradeoffs between durability and upgradeability favored the current design. If you disagree, go ahead and start your own company and make computers that compete with Apple.

Good point. Those that want what he describes should buy a Mac Pro.
post #73 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by smalM View Post

Sold units in the EU: Zero

From Apple, and not because they can't. This was imposed on them; its EU regulation. You can still buy a Mac Pro here in the Netherlands from Authorized resellers, like this one:
http://www.mailamac.nl/mac-pro-2x-2-4ghz-6-core-intel-xeon
post #74 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Tell me about it; I just bought another 3TB HDD to replace a smaller one. When I put the old one in a drawer I was surprised to see 8 older HDD's. Still functional, but small on capacity.

But with Thunderbolt, that's less of an issue. You can easily add a second hard drive that's every bit as fast as the internal one. PLUS, it's easy to take it with you when you switch to a different computer.

True, but I'm using a Mac Pro and simply swap HDD's when they become full, or stick em in a new MP when my current one dies.
post #75 of 214
Sorry for all the individual posts, but it's easier for me than a Multi-reply. Gees, another post
post #76 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plagen View Post


Since 97% of Google's revenue comes from advertising, those mysterious producst must belong to the remaining 3%. Their main product is you doing a search and then clicking on the top line search result. Usually it's Amazon or Home Depot, or Walmart.

 

That's funny, I specifically go out of my way to avoid those top "ad" links.

post #77 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post


Yup, Mac Pro would also have been my guess: it's a product line with low volume thus suitable for ramping up production without instantly having to produce millions of units.
It's also a high end product, often BTO so there are cost savings not having to air ship them, and with a high price item slightly higher production costs won't have as much an impact on the overall profit margin as expressed in percent, which is what makes investors nervous if they see that number drop.

 

Plus, they're only making and selling about 12 of them a year.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #78 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

NeXT had US assembly. There is a video of the plant somewhere online but I can't seem to locate it.

 

In fact the old NeXT plant (Fremont, CA) would be perfect for this (assuming it is the Mac Pro). That plant was tiny. Fairly low volume too. Basically one or two straight line assembly lines and some warehouse space and conference rooms.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #79 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post


Do you recall the 2004 failure based on the same mentality?

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203633104576623771022129888.html

Even the heritage foundation  doesn't like it.


http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/10/would-another-repatriation-tax-holiday-create-jobs




It just takes current problems and kicks them further out.


That's the American way. Why solve a problem when you can make more money (or keep your job) by pushing it down the road.
post #80 of 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post


That's the American way. Why solve a problem when you can make more money (or keep your job) by pushing it down the road.


I know. The problem is such behavior is recursive, and if these companies are not short on investment funds, it makes sense for them (edit: not) to refresh the process once the tax holiday has passed. I hope they don't issue one, as there's no motivation to block out better long term solutions if the issues do not present immediate problems. If that was the case this would no longer be an issue.


Edited by hmm - 5/17/13 at 7:12am
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