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Ireland says it's not responsible for Apple's low international tax rate - Page 2

post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjb View Post

IMHO, American tax resident companies should include all worldwide business & investment activities, regardless of how they structure overseas operation, in their USA company tax return and pay USA corporate tax on worldwide income.

 

Why? That makes no sense at all. The claimed point and purpose of taxes is to pay for the services provided by the governmental/state entity in which one lives or does business. This plan would essential rob any other country a company does business in, enabling someone like Apple to "free ride" on the backs of the taxpayers in those other countries.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjb View Post

Thanks for your info.

IMHO, American tax resident companies should include all worldwide business & investment activities, regardless of how they structure overseas operation, in their USA company tax return and pay USA corporate tax on worldwide income.  And it is the Government's responsibility to make sure that principle should be kept.

One more question from me.  I think that, if American companies include income generated from its subsidiaries in countries where USA has double tax agreement with, they could get credits in its USA corporate tax liability for the corporate tax paid overseas.  Am I misunderstood here?
If you suggestion where taken up to tax all activities worldwide US companies would be at a significant disadvantage to all other non-US companies. They would either have to move out of the US completely to run there global business, separate the business completely between domestic and global (non US) lines or slowly shrink and disappear.
I can't believe that is what you want.

Hat you are suggesting in your second paragraph wouldn't work either. Most countries excepting the US view tax paid in local jurisdictions as enough. The US chooses a different system which encourages offshore profits to rain offshore.

I am not a US citizen so as far as I am concerned it is not my problem. In fact it gives me and my companies a competitive advantage so hey ho!
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by festerfeet View Post


If you suggestion where taken up to tax all activities worldwide US companies would be at a significant disadvantage to all other non-US companies. They would either have to move out of the US completely to run there global business, separate the business completely between domestic and global (non US) lines or slowly shrink and disappear.
I can't believe that is what you want.

Hat you are suggesting in your second paragraph wouldn't work either. Most countries excepting the US view tax paid in local jurisdictions as enough. The US chooses a different system which encourages offshore profits to rain offshore.

I am not a US citizen so as far as I am concerned it is not my problem. In fact it gives me and my companies a competitive advantage so hey ho!

 

We individuals declare all income worldwide in income tax return in a country of tax residency.  Why should this differ to companies?  Me not USA citizen either, but I see unfairness here.  Why not giving some sort of tax credit for certain types of "global business" for them to be more competitive internationally.

post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjb View Post

We individuals declare all income worldwide in income tax return in a country of tax residency.  Why should this differ to companies?  Me not USA citizen either, but I see unfairness here.  Why not giving some sort of tax credit for certain types of "global business" for them to be more competitive internationally.

Because you're an INDIVIDUAL, not a BUSINESS. If you want to incorporate outside your native residence and do business that way then you can keep those earnings outside your native country without paying taxes until you bring those funds back into your native country.

What you're suggesting is that any company that sets and up and sells in other nations should move completely out of the US and only do business within the US via a subsidiary or mediator which would reduce this nation's strength even more. This whole notion of being taxed in the country in which you do business and then an additional 35% on the initial earnings for monies that aren't touching the US is fucking ridiculous. This goes for all companies. IBM, McDonald's, MS, Google, Samsung, Qualcomm, etc. Why is this difficult to comprehend?

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

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post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjb View Post

We individuals declare all income worldwide in income tax return in a country of tax residency.  Why should this differ to companies?  Me not USA citizen either, but I see unfairness here.  Why not giving some sort of tax credit for certain types of "global business" for them to be more competitive internationally.
You must be joking, so your dissatisfaction has now moved to the difference between how corporations and individuals are taxed?
This is starting head towards a political discussion and perhaps should be continued on a part of the forum set aside specifically for this.
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