or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Like Apple, Google & Yahoo also avoid taxes by way of Ireland
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Like Apple, Google & Yahoo also avoid taxes by way of Ireland - Page 3

post #81 of 133
Quote:

Originally Posted by studiomusic View Post
 

And who pays for all of that? The government?

Where do they get their money? From taxpayers?

Who is the largest corporate taxpayer in the US? Apple?

 

So I guess Apple's billions in taxes paid for a nice chunk of all that. More than any of you guys paid to use the same things.

 

I think you've missed the original post where it was claimed that Apple shouldn't pay repatriation tax because the Federal Government doesn't do anything for them.

 

The examples above were counters to that.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #82 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

 

 

I think you've missed the original post where it was claimed that Apple shouldn't pay repatriation tax because the Federal Government doesn't do anything for them.

 

The examples above were counters to that.


The Federal Government can do NOTHING without taxpayers. If they help in any way, it's thanks to the ones who pay for it!

post #83 of 133

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by studiomusic View Post

 

 

 

 

 

 

And who pays for all of that? The government?

Where do they get their money? From taxpayers?

Who is the largest corporate taxpayer in the US? Apple?

 

So I guess Apple's billions in taxes paid for a nice chunk of all that. More than any of you guys paid to use the same things.

The argument has been over percentages, not absolute amounts. Beyond that I don't really care to argue with your ridiculous strawman as it compares an entity of several thousand people and however many investors to a single individual.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Again with your made up crap! Double tax implies being taxed twice. That's the definition of the word "double". That you can't wrap your head around the concept that you get to decide neither what is "significant" nor what is an acceptable amount of times to tax someone is YOUR problem.


I'm genuinely unsure if you're aware of this, but foreign tax credits means it is not 35% + what they paid in whatever foreign country. It's not always clear what is non-US income anyway. Here's a link on Starbucks. I'm not implying Apple does this. The article covers practices of earnings stripping (loaning themselves money at exorbitant interest rates) and transfer pricing of coffee beans that was relatively decoupled from fair market value. It also mentions royalty payments to another subsidiary, so apparently they license their own IP. I'm not going to argue that estimated tax liabilities don't factor into retail pricing, but it's not an entirely elastic thing. If it gets too expensive, people may stop drinking as much coffee or hold onto their phone an additional cycle. What is disingenuous is when people apply the fallacy of a linear relationship between tax rates on profits and retail pricing.

post #84 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

 

 

That's great.  I don't think anyone is criticising anything about Apple's corporation tax on its profits in the USA.A

 

And I do blame the governments.  I've said more than once that while I don't condone what Apple have set up, I think it's very clever and I don't blame them for doing it.  But they have been allowed to do it via gaps in the international tax system and insufficient regulation of transfer pricing by governments.  If you're going to applaud them for paying so much tax in the USA then can you not see that it is reasonable for citizens of other countries to say "hang on, why not us too?".  And further to that, it is interesting to explore ideas for what needs to be done to prevent it, to Apple's detriment, without seeing such discussions as an attack on Apple itself but as an attack on aggressive tax avoidance in general.

There is no "international tax system". There are just hundreds of individual national tax systems. The problem is, why pray tell would Ireland want to prevent it?

post #85 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Let's see if we can find a few things that your federal taxes pay for - that benefit companies:

The Federal government:
1. Pays a large part of the cost of educating our kids.
2. Pays a large part of the cost of roads, ports, airports, etc.
3. Pays to defend our country (which is an enormous portion of the total tax revenues). Without a Federal Government, you'd probably be speaking Russian. Or maybe Chinese.
4. Provides the backbone of a banking system which is the envy of the world
5. Provides for rules that regulate pollution, food production, and so on. WIthout the Federal government, you'd probably be sick from pollution and bad food.
6. Invests enormously in technology development. It would be nearly impossible to find any existing technologies that weren't funded, at least in part, by the Federal Government.
7. Patents and other laws which provide for IP protection - which allows companies to profit from their own innovation.

There are many more, but that's a start. Arguing that companies don't benefit from Federal expenditures is just plain absurd.

 

Most of that could (and should) be done privately. Only defense (actual defense) and perhaps some pollution stuff arguably must be done through the government. IP protection is government granted monopoly and, arguably, isn't necessary either.

 

The argument is not "plain absurd."

Man, you are a piece of work lol.gif

Who are you? Mr. Potter from "It's A Wonderful Life"?

post #86 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiomusic View Post


The Federal Government can do NOTHING without taxpayers. If they help in any way, it's thanks to the ones who pay for it!

 

Sure, no one's arguing against that in principle, but it's a rules-based system, not a thanks-based system.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #87 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

 

Sure, no one's arguing against that in principle, but it's a rules-based system, not a thanks-based system.


And Apple follows the rules.

post #88 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

 

Most of that could (and should) be done privately. Only defense (actual defense) and perhaps some pollution stuff arguably must be done through the government. IP protection is government granted monopoly and, arguably, isn't necessary either.

 

The argument is not "plain absurd."

You did not even read the list or stopped at "education" and immediately went to "private". Of course, why should the poor have an education since they are just field workers and day laborers, right?

 

And regulations on food and safety? Do you really think private business can self regulate? Bangalore anyone?

 

Any form of IP protection on the honor system? Are you serious?

 

Do you want to pay a toll on every single road you drive on? Seriously? Do you think every road should be a toll road? Every side street? Every highway? Every Interstate?

 

Do you think private business would have made it to the moon in the 60's and, in doing so, created the multi-trillion dollar silicon industry. That industry alone got a 10 to 15 year boost due to the government spending on big science. Do you think private industry would build things like the Tevatron (I still weep for the near sighted fools that killed the SCSC)?

 

While privatization can be a good thing (basic utilities for example) it can also be disastrous (prisons for example) when the needs of the private company do not align with the needs of society.

post #89 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiomusic View Post

And Apple follows the rules.

 

 

And no one's arguing against that either.  I'm not sure what you're trying to say.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #90 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

So how do the countries who do have good roads, good education, good transportation, do it?

 

Mainly through higher taxation. The Nordic countries come at the very top of pretty much every measure of well-being and it's achieved through continued investment through taxation.

post #91 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

 

I see what you're doing there. I'll assume most others aren't dumb enough to fall for it (but I could be wrong on that.)

oh, yeah,

 

That ARPAnet/NSFnet thing... whatever became of it.  Damn government... probably threw it away.

post #92 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Man, you are a piece of work lol.gif

Who are you? Mr. Potter from "It's A Wonderful Life"?

 

And this is an argument how exactly?

 

Oh, it's not, you just went straight to ad hominem. Got it.

 

1rolleyes.gif

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #93 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

I'm really not sure how I can providence any evidence better than them paying less than 1% corporation rate on the fortune in the Irish subsidiaries, and a similar effective tax rate throughout the whole of Europe.  It's clear avoidance.

So you have no evidence that Apple has done anything wrong. They pay the taxes that are required by law. Where is teh tax evasion that you keep claiming?

 

Just so you know; this one little exchange right here makes it seem like you don't know the difference between the words "avoidance" and "evasion". And particularly as they relate to taxes.

post #94 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

You did not even read the list or stopped at "education" and immediately went to "private". 

 

Yes I did read the  entire list. Not making stupid assumptions here will help.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

Of course, why should the poor have an education since they are just field workers and day laborers, right?

 

Jumping right into a non sequitur huh? Good job!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

And regulations on food and safety? Do you really think private business can self regulate? Bangalore anyone?

 

Any form of IP protection on the honor system? Are you serious?

 

Do you want to pay a toll on every single road you drive on? Seriously? Do you think every road should be a toll road? Every side street? Every highway? Every Interstate?

 

Followed by another and a few straw men and false choices. You're on a role here!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

Do you think private business would have made it to the moon in the 60's and, in doing so, created the multi-trillion dollar silicon industry.

 

Then a myth.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

While privatization can be a good thing (basic utilities for example) it can also be disastrous (prisons for example) when the needs of the private company do not align with the needs of society.

 

And yet more fallacy.

 

Well, you're entire post was a waste of time.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #95 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

oh, yeah,

 

That ARPAnet/NSFnet thing... whatever became of it.  Damn government... probably threw it away.

 

Still confused are you? Still making assumptions?

 

The dearth of logical thinking here is astonishing.

 

You are assuming that the only way these things would or could have come about was through the government. This fallacious.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #96 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Man, you are a piece of work lol.gif

Who are you? Mr. Potter from "It's A Wonderful Life"?

 

And this is an argument how exactly?

 

Oh, it's not, you just went straight to ad hominem. Got it.

 

1rolleyes.gif

Meh... Nothing to argue with people like you.

But enjoy your corporate dystopia dream. You may achieve it yet.

post #97 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Meh... Nothing to argue with people like you.

 

Because you don't have one?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

But enjoy your corporate dystopia dream. You may achieve it yet.

 

Let's be clear...it is you that has the dystopian view of freedom here.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #98 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

 

Because you don't have one?

 

 

 

Let's be clear...it is you that has the dystopian view of freedom here.

The man won't be stopped!!

post #99 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

The man won't be stopped!!

 

If you're talking about me, then no. Is that what you wish? To stop me? Stop me from doing what?

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #100 of 133

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

The man won't be stopped!!

He's got a bee in his bonnet, all right. He has the self-righteousness of Techstud, and a juvenile drive for the last word. Oh, and he has the charm and wit of DaHarder. I think he may be their off-spring. 

post #101 of 133

If you ladies want to talk about someone in the 3rd person like this, take it private. Otherwise you look foolish.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #102 of 133

Given the state of the Irish economy I'm surprised Ireland is continuing to allow virtually tax-free status to corporations while its citizens undergo extreme austerity measures.  It seems like Ireland should be pursuing all of these visiting corporations for more tax.

 

It also seems to me that since Apple effectively imports all its products, they should at least be slugged an import or sales tax on each product sold, currently equivalent to 10 % in Australia.  Why the government doesn't pursue this avenue is beyond me, but having worked for governments I know how incompetent and stupid they usually are.

 

Of course, this applies to all corporations that are doing the same thing, not just Apple.

post #103 of 133
duplicate...
post #104 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

There is no "international tax system". There are just hundreds of individual national tax systems. The problem is, why pray tell would Ireland want to prevent it?

It should be obvious. If Ireland encourages other countries to tighten up their tax laws and collect more money from multinationals, it makes Ireland look even better by contrast - and gives companies even more incentive to move there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Just so you know; this one little exchange right here makes it seem like you don't know the difference between the words "avoidance" and "evasion". And particularly as they relate to taxes.

I'm quite aware of the difference.

The point is that tax avoidance is not illegal or even immoral. A company has an obligation to its shareholders to not give away more money than it has to. Thousands or millions of retirees and individuals are relying on Apple's earnings and share prices to live on. If Apple started throwing money away on things that they didn't have to, then they'd be subject to lawsuits for that. Not to mention that it would be immoral for them to unilaterally decide to take money from their shareholders and give it away to the Government.

If the government doesn't like tax avoidance, they're free to write the tax laws however they wish. Writing the laws in one way and then whining that Apple is following the laws is just plain ridiculous.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #105 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Crowly, Again; Seriously!
You have to stop speaking rationally with these spitting, stomping, little Tasmaian Devils (WB ©). It will get you nowhere.

He would have to start speaking rationally before he could stop. So far, there's been no sign of that.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #106 of 133
The government sets the tax rates. Apple pays the required taxes. How is it unfair or how are they depriving the government of revenues? The only way your argument makes sense is if all the money belongs to the government in the first place and they simply allow Apple to keep some. That's not the way it works.

For now.
post #107 of 133
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post
He would have to start speaking rationally before he could stop. So far, there's been no sign of that.

 

So why do you get to decide what is "unfair" taxation, again?

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #108 of 133

Apple should file for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status. They certainly have enough devotees to be considered a religious organization. They even have a dead prophet. 

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #109 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Apple should file for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status. They certainly have enough devotees to be considered a religious organization. They even have a dead prophet. 

 

lol.gif

 

Well played, sir.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #110 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

There is no "international tax system". There are just hundreds of individual national tax systems. The problem is, why pray tell would Ireland want to prevent it?

 

Why would Ireland want to prevent using Ireland for tax avoidance you mean?  Good question.  International pressure may sway them.  Good standing with their EU neighbours may sway them, especially since their economy is still vulnerable and may need further EU support.  And depending on what exactly is being proposed they might be able to be convinced that the holding companies that Apple has set up in Ireland aren't of any benefit to Ireland anyway, so reform to bring them under the regular tax umbrella would be a no-lose for Ireland.  Of course, Apple does employ some people in other areas of their corporate structure in Ireland, so they may have pressure in  the reverse direction.  It's by no means simple.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #111 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So why do you get to decide what is "unfair" taxation, again?

You must be referring to someone else. I've never claimed that any taxation is unfair. Legislatures set tax rates and Apple has to follow the rates that they set. No 'fair ' or 'unfair' about it.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #112 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Legislatures set tax rates and Apple has to follow the rates that they set. No 'fair ' or 'unfair' about it.

 

That is true in the strictest sense of being legal and what-not. However, for many people, even the rates are not "fair" (too low) for some (usually the rich and big businesses.) Thus, this question of "fairness" inevitably enters any discussion like this despite anyone's ability to objectively articulate what a fair amount is beyond simply "more."

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #113 of 133
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post
You must be referring to someone else. I've never claimed that any taxation is unfair. Legislatures set tax rates and Apple has to follow the rates that they set. No 'fair ' or 'unfair' about it.

 

So why would you reply, agreeing with him, about it?

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #114 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by massconn72 View Post

But we don't have good roads, good schools or decent public safety net systems in place, so what good are our taxes? There is nobody in this country that can say our monies are being put to not only good use or even proper use.

Really? Go on theync.com and see all the horrific traffic and workplace accidents in third world countries and you'll be glad of the job the DOT and OSHA have done.
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #115 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

 

 

....  If you're going to applaud them for paying so much tax in the USA then can you not see that it is reasonable for citizens of other countries to say "hang on, why not us too?"

 

First of all, I'm not applauding them for "paying so much tax in the USA". I'm applauding them for making the kind of profits that make those taxes possible. Secondly, there is no need for any of the other countries to say "why not me too?" All of the $$$ that go into the Irish holding company are "after tax" $$$$. Let me say that again. After Tax Dollars. The proper taxes are paid in the country that the profits are earned. The whole idea of the Irish holding company is to have one entity handle world wide profits, not a multitude of companies from a multitude of countries. The profits of that company is taxed in the USA.
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
post #116 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

The proper taxes are paid in the country that the profits are earned.
You may define "proper" differently to me in this context, but I think it's very apparent that this isn't actually the case. The Irish subsidiaries are clearly being used to transfer profits out of the European markets before they are subject to corporation taxes in the country of sale. The numbers tell that story.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #117 of 133
Uh, so Apple was called before a Senate subcommittee for obeying the law? A law that was written by these same senators? If the senators don't like it, they can change the law and stop blaming people for hiring good accountants and lawyers.

"Any one may so arrange his affairs that his taxes shall be as low as
possible; he is not bound to choose that pattern which will best pay the
Treasury; there is not even a patriotic duty to increase one%u2019s taxes."
%u2014 Learned Hand

"Over and over again courts have said that there is nothing sinister in
so arranging one%u2019s affairs as to keep taxes as low as possible. Everybody
does so, rich or poor; and all do right, for nobody owes any public duty
to pay more than the law demands: taxes are enforced exactions, not
voluntary contributions. To demand more in the name of morals is
mere cant."
%u2014 Learned Hand

"[T]here is nothing wrong with a strategy to avoid the payment of
taxes. The Internal Revenue Code doesn%u2019t prevent that."
%u2014 William H. Rehnquist

"Avoidance of taxes is not a criminal offense. Any attempt to reduce,
avoid, minimize, or alleviate taxes by legitimate means is permissible.
The distinction between evasion and avoidance is fine yet definite. One
who avoids tax does not conceal or misrepresent. He shapes events to
reduce or eliminate tax liability and upon the happening of the events,
makes a complete disclosure. Evasion, on the other hand, involves
deceit, subterfuge, camouflage, concealment, some attempt to color or
obscure events, or making things seem other than what they are."
%u2014 Internal Revenue Service
post #118 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjcampbell View Post

Uh, so Apple was called before a Senate subcommittee for obeying the law?

They weren't called in for obeying the law. They were called in for using the law against its intent for the purposes of generating profit at the great expense of the US Treasury.

There was a time when racial segregation wasn't against the law (no I'm not equating them). Just because things aren't written into law specifically, doesn't mean they are automatically right until someone writes a law to say so, they're just not punishable. The people at Apple knew exactly what they were doing and why, to the detriment of publicly funded services.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjcampbell View Post

"Evasion, on the other hand, involves deceit, subterfuge, camouflage, concealment, some attempt to color or obscure events, or making things seem other than what they are."

Apple has incorporated companies with no tax jurisdiction, passes funds between geographically separate subsidiaries but uses a legal loophole in order to treat them as single tax entities in Ireland, maintains and manages the cash assets and operations of the Irish subsidiaries in the US and publicly declares their US tax rates to be 30.5% when their federal tax returns are nearer 20%. I know it's just semantics but I'd say some of that fits with the definition of tax evasion used there, even if not in a legal way.

It's one thing to take advantage of tax breaks written into law for the purposes of tax relief in order to encourage economic growth and another to use bizarre international setups to get away with paying almost an order of magnitude less tax and then keeping it in a massive cash pile and not using it. They aren't the same thing at all. The intent of tax breaks is not to help insanely wealthy people build up huge piles of money they don't need and have no intention of using.
post #119 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cjcampbell View Post

Uh, so Apple was called before a Senate subcommittee for obeying the law?

They weren't called in for obeying the law. They were called in for using the law against its intent for the purposes of generating profit at the great expense of the US Treasury.

There was a time when racial segregation wasn't against the law (no I'm not equating them). Just because things aren't written into law specifically, doesn't mean they are automatically right until someone writes a law to say so, they're just not punishable. The people at Apple knew exactly what they were doing and why, to the detriment of publicly funded services.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjcampbell View Post

"Evasion, on the other hand, involves deceit, subterfuge, camouflage, concealment, some attempt to color or obscure events, or making things seem other than what they are."

Apple has incorporated companies with no tax jurisdiction, passes funds between geographically separate subsidiaries but uses a legal loophole in order to treat them as single tax entities in Ireland, maintains and manages the cash assets and operations of the Irish subsidiaries in the US and publicly declares their US tax rates to be 30.5% when their federal tax returns are nearer 20%. I know it's just semantics but I'd say some of that fits with the definition of tax evasion used there, even if not in a legal way.

It's one thing to take advantage of tax breaks written into law for the purposes of tax relief in order to encourage economic growth and another to use bizarre international setups to get away with paying almost an order of magnitude less tax and then keeping it in a massive cash pile and not using it. They aren't the same thing at all. The intent of tax breaks is not to help insanely wealthy people build up huge piles of money they don't need and have no intention of using.

 

Since your argument appears to place the responsibility for deciding how much tax to pay on the companies themselves, how would you recommend they determine which legal tax avoidance mechanisms they should use and which they should not?

 

And since tax evasion is, by definition, evasion of taxes by illegal means, Apple cannot be guilty of tax evasion if they did obey the tax laws, however much you might think they took unfair advantage of them.

post #120 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post


.... The Irish subsidiaries are clearly being used to transfer profits out of the European markets before they are subject to corporation taxes in the country of sale. ...

 

You obviously don't know what you are talking about. Do yourself a favour and go to the c-span site and watch the complete replay of the senate hearings and then, after you have been exposed to the facts, instead of your own personal interpretations of the soundbites that are reported, come back here and try another post. You know, it's been said that the only thing worse than a man who can't read is one who won't.
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Like Apple, Google & Yahoo also avoid taxes by way of Ireland