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Apple: Samsung shirked FRAND obligations, filed suit before making a licensing offer - Page 2

post #41 of 43
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post
I don't recognize the user names, but lots of banned IDs. AppleWill being just one of them. LGprada being another, in 2012, no less, nothing like referencing a long past dud, I guess.

 

Ah, that one. Good times.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Remember, though: Apple ALWAYS sues everyone. Nobody ever sues Apple.

Apple is always wrong--work backwards from there to justify anything 1smile.gif


No one says that. Why exaggerate/lie to emphasize Apple's underdog status? The woe be Apple days are gone. Evolve!

post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Demonstrably false.

 

  • The US didn't really have software patents until the early to mid 1990s.  There was plenty of innovation before then, and plenty since then that has not been patented.
  • There are hundreds of thousands of apps available, and I'd bet almost none have patent protection, yet there they are.
  • Apple has made incredible piles of money even without getting injunctions.

 

 

Trade dress and copyright used to be the only way that software was protected in the US.  The good thing about those is that they really are unique manifestations and implementations of ideas, unlike the generalized ideas we see getting patents.

 
Software patents favor huge corporations who have the time and money to seek such patents, which is why they want them to continue to exist.
 

There are groups who suggest a middle ground:  allow software patents, but limit them to two years.


I agree with your post, by and large. But I don't believe it's true that US software patent history began in the 1990s. What is true, I believe, is that the legality of software patents was established around that time (or perhaps late 80s?).

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