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Haswell chips could bring 50% more battery life to Apple's next-gen MacBooks

post #1 of 104
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The next generation in Apple's MacBook line could see 50 percent greater battery life thanks to the processors expected to go into them, according to Intel.

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In a media briefing ahead of the launch of its Haswell processor platform, Intel chief Rani Borkar said that the chipmaker had designed the line with notebooks and tablets in mind, according to PCWorld. That focus on mobile devices led to dramatic increases in battery life, with 50 percent longer operation in normal use and extending idle and standby battery life by up to 20 times.

That could mean that battery life for future MacBooks ? already near the top of the industry ? will see considerable improvements. A 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro, in AppleInsider's tests got about six hours and 15 minutes, but in normal use it should hit Apple's seven-hour estimate.

The Haswell line is the latest in the chip giant's instruction set architecture. Intel updates the lines every two years, and this year's refresh is more important than most. The rise of smartphones and tablets has hobbled the PC industry, the main source of Intel's sales. Increasingly, consumers are opting for mobile devices rather than traditional computing form factors, and Intel has struggled to gain a foothold in the mobile device segment.

The Haswell line, then, is intended to address both traditional computers and tablets as well. Some components of the line have had their power consumption reduced to as low as 7W. Intel's tablet-tailored offerings are said to offer better performance than non-Intel chipsets, but with comparable battery life.

Intel has been talking up the possibilities of the Haswell line for months ahead of its launch. Most recently, the chipmaker released a document showing that Haswell will double or triple graphics performance compared to previous models.

Apple's expected refresh of its MacBook line of devices is widely expected to feature Intel's latest and greatest processor set, and AppleInsider has already explored what impact Haswell's graphical capabilities are likely to have on the next generation of Macs.

Currently, retailers are running low on supplies of some MacBooks, and many Apple observers expect the company to announce the next generation during the keynote of its Worldwide Developer Conference in June.
post #2 of 104

Ooh! Back on the Intel hype train, are we? All aboard! Next stop: It'd Be Nice If It Were True Like They Claimed A Few Years Ago, But We Probably Won't Suffer Too Much If It Isn't And As Long As They Don't Switch To iGPUs Across The Entire Lineup…ville.

 

It would be great if Apple could pitch the MacBook Air as having 10-12 hours of battery.

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post #3 of 104
Can't wait to test both the integrated graphics performance and battery life on a new 13" rMBP!
post #4 of 104
Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.
post #5 of 104
Can't decide.. 13" MBA or iPad. Eager to see what both bring to the table this fall. I wonder if Apple plans on adding touchscreens to the MBA.
post #6 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.

They are good for 1000 full cycles before they at 80% original capacity. If you're talking about a bad battery treat it like a bad component that needs to be replaced. This whole notion that everything should be user-replaceable is an archaic and outmoded concept in 2013 for a consumer device.

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post #7 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.

 

Obviously you are one of the few that have had a bad experience, but if it bothers you that much … do it your f*cking self.  

 

It is possible to buy the part and change the battery yourself.  It will save you the "overpriced" fee, but it will be slower and I bet you screw it up. 

post #8 of 104

Retina MacBook Airs are almost a shoo-in with this technology. 

post #9 of 104

The chip will also bring 50% more battery life to competing laptops. I wish Apple would stop concentrating on how thin they can make something. Make it 2mm thicker and give me an all day battery.

post #10 of 104

I'm not quite sure it will be a 50% improvement but it should be decent if that's what they focussed on this time around. Thank you Intel!

post #11 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Obviously you are one of the few that have had a bad experience, but if it bothers you that much … do it your f*cking self.  

 

It is possible to buy the part and change the battery yourself.  It will save you the "overpriced" fee, but it will be slower and I bet you screw it up. 


From Amazon reviews, I see most people are happy with their handy work. For people whose replacement failed, the seller replaced them promptly and made the buyer happy in the end. I haven't done it. I feel that I wouldn't hesitate if I need to replace it myself.

post #12 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


They are good for 1000 full cycles before they at 80% original capacity. If you're talking about a bad battery treat it like a bad component that needs to be replaced. This whole notion that everything should be user-replaceable is an archaic and outmoded concept in 2013 for a consumer device.


Except the commenter wasn't talking about EVERYTHING...just the battery.

post #13 of 104

I want an AIR 11 inch with the ipad 2048-by-1536 retina touch display. Then I'm in.

post #14 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by youngexec View Post


Except the commenter wasn't talking about EVERYTHING...just the battery.

And his point is as foolish as wanting the GPU to be user-replaceable in a notebook in case it goes bad so he doesn't have to be without his machine for 2 days whilst Apple repairs it.

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post #15 of 104
our they could make them lighter and thinner by using a smaller batter.
post #16 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I'm not quite sure it will be a 50% improvement but it should be decent if that's what they focussed on this time around. Thank you Intel!

There will not be a 50% improvement in battery life. Haswell processors consume about 41% less power in general computer use. However, I believe the display is the primary consumer of battery life, not the CPU. Also, the wireless card and SSD drain about 2% of the battery life each. So in real world tests, laptop battery life will likely be slightly improved (maybe around 15% or so).


Edited by Negafox - 5/24/13 at 2:00pm
post #17 of 104

Haven't they said similar thinsg about SandyBridge chipset as well? Wasn't there supposed to be a sigificant battery improvement with well....EVERY new chipset relased? I don't that has come to fruitition. I hope it is true..... My rMBP battery lasts about 6-7 hours of normal use for me. So the new Haswell rMBP would last 9- 10 hours? I hope this true....i might have to upgrade just for the battery alone....

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post #18 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by youngexec View Post


Except the commenter wasn't talking about EVERYTHING...just the battery.

 

it still adds to the cost and makes other compromises to the machine (how do you have a user replaceable battery in a unibody design) when the battery should already last about 3 years if you drain it and charge it every single day.

 

I've never had to replace a battery on a unibody MacBook and we've had over a half dozen of them.

post #19 of 104

Marketing BS. These 10% improved CPUs with a decent size expansion in GPU performance won't improve battery life for squat.

post #20 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

They are good for 1000 full cycles before they at 80% original capacity. If you're talking about a bad battery treat it like a bad component that needs to be replaced. This whole notion that everything should be user-replaceable is an archaic and outmoded concept in 2013 for a consumer device.

lol. Manufacturers LOVE mind sets like yours, Sol. You're just the blank check that keeps cashing out. Meanwhile, ifixit and I continue plucking away and solving our own problems without ridiculously overpriced extended warranties and repair fees.

Speaking of battery replacement, this is funny: I can get an OEM replacement for my 2009 MBP 13" for 49 dollars online, and swap it out in about ten minutes. Apple, on the other hand, wants 130 bucks and a day to do the same thing. What? If I'm paying 50, they are probably paying 35 or less, which means they expect almost 100 dollars for ten minutes of labor. I don't care if you're Daddy Warbucks himself, that's ridiculous.
post #21 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

There will not be a 50% improvement in battery life. Haswell processors consume about 41% less power in general computer use. However, I believe the display is the primary consumer of battery life, not CPU. Also, the wireless card and SSD drain about 2% of the battery life each. So in real world tests, laptop battery life will likely be slightly improved (maybe around 15% or so).

That sounds more realistic. Thanks for reminding us that the CPU is not the only thing in the computer.

post #22 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post


lol. Manufacturers LOVE mind sets like yours, Sol. You're just the blank check that keeps cashing out. Meanwhile, ifixit and I continue plucking away and solving our own problems without ridiculously overpriced extended warranties and repair fees.

Speaking of battery replacement, this is funny: I can get an OEM replacement for my 2009 MBP 13" for 49 dollars online, and swap it out in about ten minutes. Apple, on the other hand, wants 130 bucks and a day to do the same thing. What? If I'm paying 50, they are probably paying 35 or less, which means they expect almost 100 dollars for ten minutes of labor. I don't care if you're Daddy Warbucks himself, that's ridiculous.

 

You really have access to OEM (ie Apple battery) for $50? Or is it a chinese knock-off passed off as a OEM battery that could have consequences later on (like expanding from heat, and blowing up like other aftermarket batteries have in the past)?

 

I doubt most have been as have been as hard on a MBP as I have. Running dual drives (SSD 256 & 7200 500gb in optical bay) and iOS and Mac programming an average of 10 hours a day 5-6 days a week for the last 2 years. My battery is still doing great. Doesn't mean all batteries will last like that, but no one at work or in my programming ring has had issues with batteries. 

 

BTW, isn't the retina 15" glued in? Is it still easy to replace?

 

 

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post #23 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.

 

Thanks for the completely irrelevant post. 95% of users will never need or want to replace their batteries. Also, you CAN do it yourself if you want. Apple decided that simplifying the design, removing internal complexity, and making the device thinner and more reliable for the vast majority was more important than catering to the tiny niche that might need or want to replace their battery. Apple has proven that people don't care. They were bashed for making the same decision for their iPhones and iPads. One of the biggest selling points for early Android tablets were removable batteries. Yeah, that sure helped them. I don't know a single person with an Android phone who has ever changed their battery. If you DO need to change your macbook battery, the slightly higher inconvenience/price of doing so once every several years (if you even keep your machine that long) does not outweigh everything else. 

post #24 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.

If this were an actual problem, Macs wouldn't have such through-the-roof customer satisfaction numbers. I've had Macs for the past ten years and never had a battery problem.

Why do you bother with this kind of post in such a Mac-friendly forum? Do you really think you're going to convince anyone to dislike their Macs here because they don't have removable batteries? And when much of the industry is copying this? Please find something else to hate on.
post #25 of 104

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/25/13 at 2:06pm
post #26 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.

Not sure if it is overpriced. I don't have any qualms complaining about Apple, but my MacBook Pro of 2 years is still running like a champ. Cant' say the same for my work Dell with a battery that barely lasts 1/3 as long.

 

I think their prices are fair. I would expect at least half of laptop owners to upgrade to a new machine before the battery goes bad.

post #27 of 104

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/25/13 at 2:06pm
post #28 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.


Actually, another fairly recent story - rumor or released by Apple (I forget) - said Apple's planning to start doing some lower-level services that used to have to sent to the mothership in Apple Stores on a same day basis where possible, and a battery swapout would certainly seem to be one that fits the bill if such a program's on the way.

 

I also agree that unless Apple also adopts more new power-saving parts, e.g., somehow reduces screen battery drain, that overall life - with the same battery capacity and tech - won't be bumped by more than 15-20% max.  That, though, and improved graphics in the air line (little pun there), are likely my tipping point. 

And the current Air IS light enough, so I also hope we don't get the same battery life in a trade-off with the "you can't be too thin" aesthetic.

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post #29 of 104
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... Intel chief Rani Borkar said that the chipmaker had designed the line with notebooks and tablets in mind ...

 

Oh now Intel gets it.  Laptop computers have been around since the GRiD Compass 1100 in 1982.

And 31 years later, in 2013, Intel decides that it's finally time to design CPUs with laptops "in mind."

And that suddenly, out of thin air, we will get "50 percent longer operation in normal use."

That reeks of decades of complacency as they milked the market for power-hog Wintel desktops.

Because they had no serious competition, with all due respect to AMD.

And now they're waking up to the shock of post-PC disruption of their hegemony.

And just like that, they're finally getting serious about power efficiency.  And maybe too late.

 


Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The rise of smartphones and tablets has hobbled the PC industry, the main source of Intel's sales. Increasingly, consumers are opting for mobile devices rather than traditional computing form factors, and Intel has struggled to gain a foothold in the mobile device segment.

 

This is what I mean by "maybe too late."

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post #30 of 104
A 50% improvement would be very nice, but can a CPU by itself account for all that? I thought its the display that's the main power hog here. Unless they go IGZO I don't see such a major improvement in battery life occurring.
post #31 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.

My nearly four year old MBP has a battery health of 87%. I'll have a Retina MBP long before my battery fails.

 

 

Anyway, I am hoping for Haswell Retina MBPs to be ready to ship in July. Am I just dreaming?

post #32 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by youngexec View Post

I want an AIR 11 inch with the ipad 2048-by-1536 retina touch display. Then I'm in.

Why can't they leverage the 'volume' pricing on iPads to put that display in the Air?

 

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WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

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post #33 of 104
Quote:

Oh now Intel gets it.  Laptop computers have been around since the GRiD Compass 1100 in 1982.

And 31 years later, in 2013, Intel decides that it's finally time to design CPUs with laptops "in mind."

And that suddenly, out of thin air, we will get "50 percent longer operation in normal use."

That reeks of decades of complacency as they milked the market for power-hog Wintel desktops.

Because they had no serious competition, with all due respect to AMD.

And now they're waking up to the shock of post-PC disruption of their hegemony.

And just like that, they're finally getting serious about power efficiency.  And maybe too late.

 

 

Yep.

 

Lemon Bon Bon.

You know, for a company that specializes in the video-graphics market, you'd think that they would offer top-of-the-line GPUs...

 

WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

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You know, for a company that specializes in the video-graphics market, you'd think that they would offer top-of-the-line GPUs...

 

WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

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post #34 of 104
Quote:
The rise of smartphones and tablets has hobbled the PC industry, the main source of Intel's sales. Increasingly, consumers are opting for mobile devices rather than traditional computing form factors, and Intel has struggled to gain a foothold in the mobile device segment.
 

 

*tiny violin for intel.

 

Lemon Bon Bon.

You know, for a company that specializes in the video-graphics market, you'd think that they would offer top-of-the-line GPUs...

 

WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

Reply

You know, for a company that specializes in the video-graphics market, you'd think that they would offer top-of-the-line GPUs...

 

WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

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post #35 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

There will not be a 50% improvement in battery life. Haswell processors consume about 41% less power in general computer use. However, I believe the display is the primary consumer of battery life, not CPU. Also, the wireless card and SSD drain about 2% of the battery life each. So in real world tests, laptop battery life will likely be slightly improved (maybe around 15% or so).

Exactly. Even if the CPU used NO power, it's unlikely that the laptop would have 50% longer battery life.
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post #36 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Increasingly, consumers are opting for mobile devices rather than traditional computing form factors, and Intel has struggled to gain a foothold in the mobile device segment.

Is it just me or do people need so little computing capability these days that they can get by with just a mobile device? Hell, I can't even get by with just a rMBP 15, I am just such a long time user of large screen monitors and multi-cpu machines that I would feel crippled without my familiar desktops. To me it would be like after owning a luxury automobile to have get by with only a bicycle. Sure I have a couple mobile devices, and I also own a bicycle but it is not my only mode of transportation.

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post #37 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Still doesn't solve the problem of being without your laptop for a few days while its battery gets changed when it goes bad. Not to mention Apple's overpriced battery replacement fee.

The Apple Store in Tampa replaced mine while I waited and did it under Apple Care on my two and a half year old MBP.
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post #38 of 104

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/25/13 at 2:06pm
post #39 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


They are good for 1000 full cycles before they at 80% original capacity. If you're talking about a bad battery treat it like a bad component that needs to be replaced. This whole notion that everything should be user-replaceable is an archaic and outmoded concept in 2013 for a consumer device.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Obviously you are one of the few that have had a bad experience, but if it bothers you that much … do it your f*cking self.  

 

It is possible to buy the part and change the battery yourself.  It will save you the "overpriced" fee, but it will be slower and I bet you screw it up. 

Actually I've done a few for friends. It's not that hard to do but now Apple has started gluing them in and according to iFixIt pretty much impossible to do without damaging the ribbon that goes to the trackpad. 

 

I'm still running a 17" 2006 Macbook that does have a removable battery. I'm on my forth battery. 

post #40 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Exactly. Even if the CPU used NO power, it's unlikely that the laptop would have 50% longer battery life.

They never made the claim specific to the cpu, which only accounts for a fraction of power consumption. Their prior claims suggested that this would require much more aggressive power management of logic board components as well. I can't find the articles at the moment, which were pretty far back. My guess is that they projected these numbers using specific reference configurations that are unlikely to be followed. Intel's numbers are always pretty far out there, which is why I ignore them until they're tested.

 

Aside from that, is the forum software clipping anyone else's posts? I wrote more initially but I don't feel like retyping all of it on an edit.

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