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I know why.....

 

Quote:
He is part of an alarming trend among baby boomers, whose suicide rates shot up precipitously between 1999 and 2010.

 

It has long held true that elderly people have higher suicide rates than the overall population. But numbers released in May by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a dramatic spike in suicides among middle-aged people, with the highest increases among men in their 50s, whose rate went up by nearly 50 percent to 30 per 100,000; and women in their early 60s, whose rate rose by nearly 60 percent (though it is still relatively low compared with men, at 7 in 100,000). The highest rates were among white and Native American and Alaskan men. In recent years, deaths by suicide has surpassed deaths by motor vehicle crashes.

 

As youths, boomers had higher suicide rates than earlier generations; the confluence of that with the fact that they are now beginning to grow old, when the risk traditionally goes up, has experts worried. The findings suggest that more suicide research and prevention should “address the needs of middle-aged persons,” a CDC statement said.

 

It isn't alarming. It should be expected and we should expect it to get far worse. This is the cowards way of dealing with a lifetime of bad choices.

 

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“There was an illusion of choice — where people thought they’d be able to re-create themselves again and again,” he said. “These people feel a greater sense of disappointment because their expectations of leading glorious lives didn’t come to fruition.”

 

While believing you are going to be a never aging rock star who parties on forever is indeed an illusion, the debts and train-wrecks lives they have created are very real.

 

Quote:
Instead, compared with their parents’ generation, boomers have higher rates of obesity, prescription and illicit drug abuse, alcoholism, divorce, depression and mental disorders. As they age, many add to that list chronic illness, disabilities and the strains of caring for their parents and for adult children who still depend on them financially.

 

I'd bet that a study into who is helping who financially would show that the boomer parents are benefiting from their child being home. Most of them are so broke that a kid grabbing the spare bedroom and paying some of the still new mortgage, the ever higher "green" electric bill or something along those lines really helps. This isn't a one way street.

 

 

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“We know that what men want to do is work — that’s a very strong ethic for them,” Arbore said. “When their jobs are being threatened, they see themselves as still needing to be in that role; they feel ashamed when they’re not able to find another job, or when their home is being foreclosed on. . . . The idea that so many of us in this country have been brought up with — that you work hard, you get your house, you get your American dream, everything is rosy — it hasn’t worked out. A lot of these boomers aren’t going to earn as much money as their parents did. They aren’t going to be as secure as their parents were. And that’s quite troubling for the boomers.”

 

Wealth creation stops or is dramatically lower in many cases when divorce, obesity, drug and alcohol abuse are present. What is troubling is that we still don't, as a society seem to address or think about this. The issue is the same when measuring "household" wealth where the "households" are single parent high school dropouts in one instance and two parent, college educated and employed adults in the other instance. Two can't be one no matter how good the intentions. For the boomers, quality time is never quantity time. Daddy leaving Mommy or the reverse have some huge ramifications for wealth creation and mental health.

 

Quote:

Nor are women immune. When Liz Strand’s 53-year-old friend killed herself two years ago in California, her house was underwater and needed repairs, she had a painful ankle that was exacerbated by being overweight, and although she had tried to find a partner, she was unmarried, like one-third of baby boomers.

 

“When everything started exploding on her it was too much for her,” Strand said, adding that as a boomer she herself recalls the shock of realizing that the good times were not eternal. “I just thought everything was going to continue to improve. I remember hearing at one point in a college class that, ‘No, it’s a pendulum.’ It was a real wake-up call.”

 

Two doesn't equal one. Her house was underwater because although she was thirty and probably bought her first house in 1988 or so, she wanted to roll the dice and place the market with a new "investment home" and new 30 year mortgage at 50+. Who thinks they are going to live forever and start doubling down at 50+ years old? The boomers as a generation have done this and are paying the price.

 

 

Quote:

“There are people who believe that this won’t hold true, that the baby boomers as they grow older will have some kind of protective effect,” said Yeates Conwell, professor of psychiatry at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. “They have strength in numbers, they have quite a lot of political clout and by and large the financial resources of the baby boomers are quite high.”

 

For Turkaly, the Pittsburgh man, it helps to know that statistics show he is not the only guy his age having a hard time.

 

“I guess it makes me feel better, ’cause I’m not quite as alone as I think I am,” he said. “It’s not just me; it’s just the way things happened.”

 

It's not just the way things happened. It isn't just fate. The choices were made, the dice were rolled and this generation is ready to crap out.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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