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post #161 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by daewalker View Post

But the vast majority use Microsoft Office. 

Um... the vast majority uses PCs too. Do you have a point?

post #162 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by daewalker View Post

It's people that believe Apple can do no wrong and that there is no room for improvement hinder development, progress, innovation, etc.  If we lived in your world, we'd still be working on Apple IIc's.

 

So Office Ribbon is development, progress, innovation, etc? Yeah, right up there with bumping phones to exchange playlists. lol.gif

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post #163 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacManFelix View Post

I assure you all: you would not be happy with induction charging for at least the following reasons:

1) When charging from a cable, one can still easily hold the phone and do whatever he wishes while it charges: type, play games, talk on the phone (I know, no one does this anymore), leave it next to you on the bed for a sleep cycle monitor…etc. Why would anyone want to hold an induction pad to the back of the phone to use it while charging it? This is the Number one deal breaker for inductive charging

2) Cable charging works great in a moving car or boat, the iPhone would slip off an inductive charger frequently.

3) Inductive charging is is inefficient—current iPhones can be charged with tiny solar panels (camping, sailboats etc—yes many of us do this.)

4) Inductive charging is slower, who the hell wants that?!?

5) Cord sync is still faster and more reliable. What if your phone bricks and needs a full software restore?

Fully agree with your points. Plus I can easily carry a USB charging cable in my pocket and use any available USB point to charge my phone. Who wants to carry an inductive charger with them everywhere?
post #164 of 200
Jony Ive in the house. Now it's time to get excited!

BMWUzZfCUAA1CRg.jpg

H/T https://mobile.twitter.com/SamGabbay/status/343844557290622976/photo/1
post #165 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stef View Post

Ask yourself: Would you rather create a product of such excellence that one person would pay a million bucks for it or create a product so popular that a million people would pay one buck for it? Which do you think Apple prefers? And which Samsung?

Apple would prefer neither of these scenarios.

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"History will reduce the Apple Watch—if it ever reaches the shop floor—
to a footnote in the annals of technology."

-Benjamin Frost

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post #166 of 200
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
Jony Ive in the house. Now it's time to get excited!

 

He's obviously carrying the new 17" iPad.

post #167 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

He's obviously carrying the new 17" iPad.

Good eye.
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post #168 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
Jony Ive in the house. Now it's time to get excited!

 

He's obviously carrying the new 17" iPad.

Hmmm.... could it be a supercharged new display -- over time, replacing the Cinema Display -- that also doubles as a bad-a$$ iPad if/when needed? 1smoking.gif

post #169 of 200
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
Hmmm.... could it be a supercharged new display -- over time, replacing the Cinema Display -- that also doubles as a bad-a$$ iPad if/when needed? 1smoking.gif

 

I'd buy one.

post #170 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


I disagre in that I think that Apple should make iLife and iWork apps available on Windows... For the exact reason that they made iTunes available on Windows -- it makes iDevices easier to sell -- and introduces the "Apple Way" to non-Apple users (the halo).

I assume that iLife and iWork would be actively enhanced and maintained... Lean and mean!

Scenario: Start creating your document, spreadsheet or preso with iWork instead of Office -- then access it seamlessly among your computers and mobile devices. It won't be acceptable for the "power" Office users... But for the millions of Moms, Dads, Kids and Grandparents... I/They don't want or need the Office bloat on any of their computers or iDevices.

Dick, As much as I usually agree with you, on this issue ... not so much. When iTunes became available for windows, it was to sell Apple devices, but those devices were only used to play music, for the most part. Even so, iTunes on a Windows device is not the same high quality user experience that it is on an iPod. That lesser experience, which is usually due to the lesser quality of the device, sometimes leaves a bad impression on a user about Apple ... because Apple designed the software, but has no control of the hardware, in the case of Windows.

 

I think the whole success of Apple is the degree of control they have from top to bottom when putting a product out to market and to dilute that control to the many other "computer manufacturers" would not serve them well. I'd rather see that gap between Mac and PC widen instead of giving a PC user a similar experience in a PC. 

 

On another topic, I'd bet tomorrow we're going to see a major announcement re: a new Apple TV with an opening up of the platform for "a new app store"? for tv apps. That would explain "a whole new world developing". I'm thinking much larger storage for gaming, etc. and the ability for 3rd party apps would excite the market ... fresh dollars. We'll see, not long now.

Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
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post #171 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

He's obviously carrying the new 17" iPad.

Nah, That's his wallet.

Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
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Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
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post #172 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

Dick, As much as I usually agree with you, on this issue ... not so much. When iTunes became available for windows, it was to sell Apple devices, but those devices were only used to play music, for the most part. Even so, iTunes on a Windows device is not the same high quality user experience that it is on an iPod. That lesser experience, which is usually due to the lesser quality of the device, sometimes leaves a bad impression on a user about Apple ... because Apple designed the software, but has no control of the hardware, in the case of Windows.

 

I think the whole success of Apple is the degree of control they have from top to bottom when putting a product out to market and to dilute that control to the many other "computer manufacturers" would not serve them well. I'd rather see that gap between Mac and PC widen instead of giving a PC user a similar experience in a PC. 

 

On another topic, I'd bet tomorrow we're going to see a major announcement re: a new Apple TV with an opening up of the platform for "a new app store"? for tv apps. That would explain "a whole new world developing". I'm thinking much larger storage for gaming, etc. and the ability for 3rd party apps would excite the market ... fresh dollars. We'll see, not long now.

You may be correct about iWork.  However, Apple really needs to release Maps for Android, Mac, and Windows.  iMessage also needs to be available on Android, but not windows.  Here's the rationale, Maps need to be integrated with lots of other apps and many developers are just going to use Google Maps since they can program for it on all platforms.  For iMessage, we need to be able to connect with non-Apple users, especially since they are the majority of cell phone users.  

post #173 of 200
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post
However, Apple really needs to release Maps for Android, Mac, and Windows.

 

Not really… It'd be great for OS X, but they absolutely don't need to release it on any platform, and NEVER will on Android/Windows.


iMessage also needs to be available on Android…

 

And not at all. Why do Android idiots deserve infinite free messaging for paying Apple absolutely nothing?


For iMessage, we need to be able to connect with non-Apple users, especially since they are the majority of cell phone users.  

 

No, people need to become Apple users. What sort of rationale is this?! Apple is a company, for heaven's sake. Android is a wholly stolen product. Why should Apple even acknowledge it EXISTS, much less make anything that keeps people away from iOS? Come on.


Edited by Tallest Skil - 6/9/13 at 6:29pm
post #174 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I have both MS Office and iWork. I work with and share from both. I agree re. Numbers. Excel is (currently) superior. But Keynote and Pages are far better than PPT and Word, respectively, in my experience.

That misses the point, too.

The vast majority of people could use Pages or Word. The vast majority of people could use PPT or Keynote. The number of people who need to use Excel instead of Numbers is somewhat larger, but I'll bet it's still a minority.

EITHER ONE is perfectly OK for what most people do with these apps. The differences (either way) are only visible to a tiny fraction of users. For the rest, they're mostly just using what they're familiar with.
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post #175 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

You say that Apple is still developing the technology and then go on to say that it's actually Sharp or other manufacturers developing the technology haha.  Freudian slip.

What a sharp mind you have, but are you paying attention?

Do you think Apple spent a billion plus on Sharp by just writing them a check with no strings, or do you think maybe Apple has engineers working on the production procesess for their IGZO screens with them? Do you imagine that Apple is sitting around in Cupertino, after spending a billion, waiting for Sharp to say, "Ok, we're ready, how many millions of displays was it that you needed again?"

Yes the technology comes from Sharp and Semiconductor Energy Laboratories, but it ain't going into tens of millions of mobile devices without Apple bankrolling and overseeing the devlopment. So who's the developer in this scenario?

My point was that there are people whining about Apple's pace of development who are incapable of cause and effect technical reasoning, probably because they have never seen a factory floor in the whole of their sheltered lives. You may now join that club. I nominate you.
Edited by Flaneur - 6/9/13 at 7:20pm
post #176 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Not really… It'd be great for OS X, but they absolutely don't need to release it on any platform, and NEVER will on Android/Windows.

And not at all. Why do Android idiots deserve infinite free messaging for paying Apple absolutely nothing?

No, people need to become Apple users. What sort of rational is this?! Apple is a company, for heaven's sake. Android is a wholly stolen product. Why should Apple even acknowledge it EXISTS, much less make anything that keeps people away from iOS? Come on.

This is massively, irrefutably correct. Android is tainted. You can smell the sulfer, to borrow a line from a certain departed political figure.

Edit: I had to laugh when Daniel called a "hobbyist" platform, but I think he's being kind.
Edited by Flaneur - 6/9/13 at 6:40pm
post #177 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

He's obviously carrying the new 17" iPad.
Nope I'm pretty sure that's Apple's answer to the Galaxy Mega series phones: the iPhone XL
post #178 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


What a sharp mind you have, but are you paying attention?

Do you think Apple spent a billion plus on Sharp by just writing them a check with no strings, or do you think maybe Apple has engineers working on the production procesess for their IGZO screens with them? Do you imagine that Apple is sitting around in Cupertino, after spending a billion, waiting for Sharp to say, "Ok, we're ready, how many millions of displays was it that you needed again?"

Yes the technology comes from Sharp and Semiconductor Research Laboratories, but it ain't going into tens of millions of mobile devices without Apple bankrolling and overseeing the devlopment. So who's the developer in this scenario?

My point was that there are people whining about Apple's pace of development who are incapable of cause and effect technical reasoning, probably because they have never seen a factory floor in the whole of their sheltered lives. You may now join that club. I nominate you.

Apple did the same thing with Samsung some years back... I would be ready to bet a lot (just short of my private parts) that they have learned from the experience and are now much more protected/involved - technology and design wise.

post #179 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juil View Post

Apple did the same thing with Samsung some years back... I would be ready to bet a lot (just short of my private parts) that they have learned from the experience and are now much more protected/involved - technology and design wise.

Indeed. I wish we could learn more about this sort of thing, but how you manage your supplier partnerships are probably as much a trade secret as any other piece of the technical puzzle of making an "incredible" Tim Cook product. He'll never get credit for what they pull off, because we'll never know how it all works in this new global game.

Can you remind us what the Samsung investment or partnership was about?
post #180 of 200

Everyone is curious, excited and even anxious about the big reveal tomorrow. The buzz surrounds first and foremost the anticipated new look and feel that iOS7. Second or equal to that is the anticipation of new hardware - new MacBooks, new Mac Pro and maybe even new Apple TV? Running third but not least is Mac OS 10.9.

 

Personally, I think none of the above is the big reveal. Instead, the most important thing we will learn tomorrow is whether Jony Ive is the rightful successor to Steve Jobs as the arbiter of design at the most visible computer design company in the world. It is not the fate of Apple that is at stake. The evolution of computing could be reshaped if Ive is up to the task. If he falters, it leaves an opening for someone else, possibly outside Apple, to steal the spotlight.

 

It will be interesting to see if Ive himself takes the stage. He has done this so rarely in the past, opting instead to present his design in video. How will he unveil his handiwork this time?

 

As the Scots say, Dun Dun Dun Dundee Dun ...


Edited by StruckPaper - 6/9/13 at 7:40pm
post #181 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


What a sharp mind you have, but are you paying attention?

Do you think Apple spent a billion plus on Sharp by just writing them a check with no strings, or do you think maybe Apple has engineers working on the production procesess for their IGZO screens with them? Do you imagine that Apple is sitting around in Cupertino, after spending a billion, waiting for Sharp to say, "Ok, we're ready, how many millions of displays was it that you needed again?"

Yes the technology comes from Sharp and Semiconductor Research Laboratories, but it ain't going into tens of millions of mobile devices without Apple bankrolling and overseeing the devlopment. So who's the developer in this scenario?

My point was that there are people whining about Apple's pace of development who are incapable of cause and effect technical reasoning, probably because they have never seen a factory floor in the whole of their sheltered lives. You may now join that club. I nominate you.

 

In the exact scenario you described, Sharp would be the developer. There isn't even a question about it. But the real scenario is not what you describe.

post #182 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

In the exact scenario you described, Sharp would be the developer. There isn't even a question about it. But the real scenario is not what you describe.

Ok you describe it.

Apple and Sharp are co-developers, the way I see it. The technology will not go mainstream in time (vis à vis OLED, say) unless Foxconn and Apple get behind it and spend the billions for production. And Samsung.
post #183 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Please tell us exactly how Pages and Keynote are 'crippled', instead of just making bland assertions?

 

These types never do. They expect you to accept their statement as fact without question.

post #184 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


Ok you describe it.

Apple and Sharp are co-developers, the way I see it. The technology will not go mainstream in time (vis à vis OLED, say) unless Foxconn and Apple get behind it and spend the billions for production. And Samsung.

Based on your logic, venture capitalists and bankers can be considered co-developers of all sorts of technology? 

post #185 of 200

I don't know if I will be able to control myself from checking my favorite Apple coverage sites tomorrow. I mean all the secrecy has really got me amped up. I want to keep it that way and watch the keynote without any spoilers. Perhaps Apple will stream it live...

post #186 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

That misses the point, too.

The vast majority of people could use Pages or Word. The vast majority of people could use PPT or Keynote. The number of people who need to use Excel instead of Numbers is somewhat larger, but I'll bet it's still a minority.

It obviously misses the point for you.

 

In the community in which I live, every high school kid is taught Excel. I'll bet that is similar in lots of other public schools. (The same kids, btw, use Pages and Keynote for their assignments and presentations, since pretty much all the school computers are Macs, and most of the kids I know end up buying Macs as their 4-year computer for high school.)

 

Perhaps the overall number of Excel users is less than the number of Word users, but I'd be willing to bet it's a heck of a lot larger than PPT users.

post #187 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

Based on your logic, venture capitalists and bankers can be considered co-developers of all sorts of technology? 

Did you miss the part about the Apple engineers? Do you think it was money alone that brought us IPS, Retina displays, GF2 on the iPad mini, the new lamination to the top glass on the iMac? Do you think Apple gets these produced by diverse manufacturers with just a purchase order, or do you maybe suspect that they have engineers on site making sure things are humming right along quality and yield wise as a worldwide launch date involving say five million units for the first weekend approaches?
post #188 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


Did you miss the part about the Apple engineers? Do you think it was money alone that brought us IPS, Retina displays, GF2 on the iPad mini, the new lamination to the top glass on the iMac? Do you think Apple gets these produced by diverse manufacturers with just a purchase order, or do you maybe suspect that they have engineers on site making sure things are humming right along quality and yield wise as a worldwide launch date involving say five million units for the first weekend approaches?

Did you miss the part blah blah blah blah blah?

 

You confuse development with production, along with many other things. How ironic that you are constantly challenging people on whether they know this and that, and whether they've been on a production floor, when in fact you clearly have little experience in all of these areas. No problem. I get it.

 

 
post #189 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

Did you miss the part blah blah blah blah blah?

You confuse development with production, along with many other things. How ironic that you are constantly challenging people on whether they know this and that, and whether they've been on a production floor, when in fact you clearly have little experience in all of these areas. No problem. I get it.

So inform us. All I know is what's in the papers, and I don't see people thinking it through. Production, the making of the thing, is just as much a part of the development as the chemistry or the electronics. You don't have an invention until you can make it in the millions in this game.
Edited by Flaneur - 6/9/13 at 9:21pm
post #190 of 200
Wall Street is ruining the world.
post #191 of 200

"....Over the past decade, Apple has built a tech empire that rivals the scope and influence of Microsoft in the 1990s, differentiated primarily in that Apple's products are being sold openly next to the competition; Microsoft helped ensure that there simply wasn't any competition. And this factor seems to be a key reason why the media, pundits and investment community analysts have such a hard time understanding why Apple is still in business...."

 

At least for me this is the key message in this article...

post #192 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

What a sharp mind you have, but are you paying attention?

Do you think Apple spent a billion plus on Sharp by just writing them a check with no strings, or do you think maybe Apple has engineers working on the production procesess for their IGZO screens with them? Do you imagine that Apple is sitting around in Cupertino, after spending a billion, waiting for Sharp to say, "Ok, we're ready, how many millions of displays was it that you needed again?"

Yes the technology comes from Sharp and Semiconductor Energy Laboratories, but it ain't going into tens of millions of mobile devices without Apple bankrolling and overseeing the devlopment. So who's the developer in this scenario?

My point was that there are people whining about Apple's pace of development who are incapable of cause and effect technical reasoning, probably because they have never seen a factory floor in the whole of their sheltered lives. You may now join that club. I nominate you.

I think Apple absolutely has engineers on site. They oversee development, the development done by the companies who are actually making the displays (just one example part). They are there to guide the process to make sure it meets specifications, but they aren't developing the technology and may not even be working with the suppliers from start to end. Apple is great at designing products where all their suppliers' parts come into a beautiful, cohesive whole, but the parts are still developed and manufactured by those suppliers. The way it works is that suppliers bring prototypes and reports about current/expected yields, cost, design constraints, etc. to Apple, who has requested these things as they work on the overall product design. They choose the best supplier or suppliers based on these “auditions" and go from there to assemble lustworthy products. But don't confuse the coordination and design of the final product with the development of all the components it contains.
post #193 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

It obviously misses the point for you.

In the community in which I live, every high school kid is taught Excel. I'll bet that is similar in lots of other public schools. (The same kids, btw, use Pages and Keynote for their assignments and presentations, since pretty much all the school computers are Macs, and most of the kids I know end up buying Macs as their 4-year computer for high school.)

Perhaps the overall number of Excel users is less than the number of Word users, but I'd be willing to bet it's a heck of a lot larger than PPT users.

But of that number, the overwhelming majority could just as easily use Numbers. The point is that most users could use either one - but choose the one they're most familiar with.
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post #194 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


No. Apple gives what people need.
Not sure what you mean. You want it to be cheaper, or expected it to cost more, with all its high tech and well designed hardware and software?
Not sure what you're getting at, but it looks like you wish for 'a richer sound experience'. But how will this work if the majority listens to music on their iOS device, with the included cheap headphones or self procured $300 ones? If these files are 20 times as large iDevices would be filled rather rapidly, no?

Yes, for home use we are still in the HDD area, but I sure hope Apple is going to kill it like they have done so many times in the past. All for the better, I say.


People are more likely to buy what they want. Buying things is an emotional decision when work isn't part of the equation. If people can't get what they want then they are less likely to buy a product.

 

The iPod Touch is way overpriced for what you get.

 

If Apple created a lossless codec that totally reproduced the full range of analog recordings they could resell their entire iTunes library to people who want the best experience. That would bring in billions of dollars.

 

If the iDevices filled up then Apple could sell bigger capacity models and earn more money.

post #195 of 200

 

 

 

apple web site changes......

post #196 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

People are more likely to buy what they want. Buying things is an emotional decision when work isn't part of the equation. If people can't get what they want then they are less likely to buy a product.

The iPod Touch is way overpriced for what you get.

If Apple created a lossless codec that totally reproduced the full range of analog recordings they could resell their entire iTunes library to people who want the best experience. That would bring in billions of dollars.

If the iDevices filled up then Apple could sell bigger capacity models and earn more money.

Apple shows people what they want before the people realize this.

iPod touch is cheaper than what the original iPod cost. Not looking at inflation, that is. But the price is not the sum of its components. I think 400 is fair. The iPhone is getting more expensive, at my location at least.

They have indeed been tinkering on the idea of higher bit rate, 96kHz and all that, so an upsell could work.

Good point on the bigger capacity and earning more money. But why haven't they made the Classic 1TB? I thought there was a 9.5mm laptop-sized HDD, no?
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post #197 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Oh, cloud of doubt. It's an Apple event. It never lives up to the expectation, even when it exceeds the expectation. People (Wall Street) are worthless idiots. If every single Apple product WAS updated simultaneously, as they desire, at every single Apple event, they'd complain that Apple didn't update them enough. 


They'll never be happy. The point for Apple is to make people (real people) happy and ignore Wall Street. And they're gonna do it. They always do, you know? We're two days out and how many leaks have we had? None. Not a one. Everything we know, Apple has told us.

 

It's gonna be big. 

 

Here's to OS X and iOS, as well as hopefully Haswell Macs. And here's to Apple, showing us that they won't give up on workstations. Hopefully.

That's absolutely correct.   The press and Wall Street only think in the simplest of terms, so the only thing that would satisfy them would be a surprise announcement of a totally new product line, akin to the iPod, iPhone or iPad.   Since that is not going to happen, they'll be countless stories about "Apple has lost it, since they haven't released a new product line since Steve Jobs passed away, blah, blah, blah."    The general press does not care about an upgraded processor if the industrial design of the product looks the same as the last one.   They don't care if a device is faster.    They don't even care much if the display has a higher resolution.     They're idiots.   But if Apple came out with a 3D display that didn't require glasses, they would get very excited even though it would be useless to almost everyone except perhaps gamers.

 

Wall Street doesn't seem to care that there are multiple and competing car manufacturers or TV manufacturers or camera manufacturers or clothing manufacturers.   But because Apple hasn't put Samsung out of business, that's interpreted as a flaw in Apple's strategy.    And if Apple had succeeded in knocking Samsung out, Apple would probably be subject to monopoly investigations and the like.    The fact is that competition is good and I believe that Samsung (and Android) drive Apple to produce better products.      However, if iOS6 is just a very minor upgrade, I might start to get a bit concerned.   

 

Frankly, I can't think of a single thing Apple could do in the current product line to get Wall Street and the Press excited.  Even if they doubled performance and halved the price, I don't think they'd be excited.   

 

Having said that, I do think Apple needs to find a way to create some excitement even when they're not announcing new product lines.    I realize that's harder to do when we're overwhelmed with new devices from multiple manufacturers all the time.   

 

 

I still maintain that Apple is working on something very secretly - the number of employees to be housed at the old and new campuses seems to me to be too many for their current activities, aside from more people to handle third party sales.    As I've stated before, my prediction is that in ten years, Apple will be a robotics company.    I think Siri is the first zygote step in that evolution.  

post #198 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

He's obviously carrying the new 17" iPad.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Good eye.

 

You joke, but what the hell is he carrying?    I refuse to believe Apple would make an iPad that large.    

post #199 of 200
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

That's absolutely correct. 


And as if to once again prove my point, the stock's down $1.65 right now.

post #200 of 200
Originally Posted by Juil View Post

 

So if I get you correctly, you’re saying you know more than Apple what’s best in terms of development platform!?

 

I'm at least saying I knew it first, posted it in detail years ago (anyone can go and find it on fyngyrz.com), and as of today's announcement, they now agree with me, since a lot of that is now part of iOS (and also OSX... they fixed a good deal of the stuff I pointed out there as well, like the broken menu system, finder weaknesses, etc.) I don't care a whit if *you* agree with me. I just care that they are finally addressing these long-existing problems.

 

Originally Posted by Juil View Post

By the way, if you want to be taken even remotely seriously, I advise you to avoid complete falsehoods like "not to mention the closed development process".

 

Oh, good ever-loving head-slapping simple-minded grief.

 

So, you consider a process where you 1) pay to get on board, 2) can't give apps to anyone else without an expiring "provisioning" process, and even then, distribution is severely limited, 3) you have to submit your app to Apple for "approval", 4) they may or may not allow you to sell it (or give it away... you can't even do that w/o approval), 4) and then they arbitrarily take 30% of your earnings... open? That's open?

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