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Apple's new direction for iOS 7 leverages technology to impress

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
"Our goal at Apple is to make great products that our customers love," Apple's chief executive Tim Cook stated at the end of the WWDC keynote. Happening upon what customers love is a bit more complicated than it sounds, however.

iOS 7


Prior to the unveiling of iOS 7, it was widely rumored that Apple would strip the "skeuomorphic" aspects of its appearance, details like faux "Corinthian leather" in the Calendar app and the virtual green felt of Game Center.

Less obvious was the actual overall look Apple would target, and particularly how it would going about arriving at a given overall appearance. However, the company has been dropping hints at its design direction for months.

The web pages for iPhone 5 and iPad mini introduced the delicate use of Helvetica Nueue Ultra Light, and apps ranging from last fall's iTunes 11 to the WWDC app itself (below) hinted at a path toward a lighter, cleaner, flatter design.


iphone 4s


via Garee's Blog


Leveraging technology in design



There's also the general progression of Apple's core technologies. In 2001, Mac OS X introduced "Quartz" as a new compositing graphics engine that enabled real transparency and shadowing effects. Initially, Apple used this to reflect the translucent white plastics of the then new iMac.

It took Microsoft more than half a decade to bring similar advanced graphics compositing to Windows in Vista, giving Apple a design lead advanced through technology.

When the iPhone arrived in 2007, it built upon OS X's advance graphics foundation to deliver hardware accelerated animations throughout the interface that reflected its new multitouch interface, a pair of modern concepts that instantly made the existing crop of button and thumbwheel driven smartphones look ancient.

Similar to Microsoft's Vista, Google's Android smartphones didn't gain similar graphics capabilities until version 4.0 arrived at the end of 2011 (and most Android phones still don't run this version of the software), again about a half decade after Apple unveiled its original iOS product.

Were Apple to simply give iOS 7 a revamped "skin," it would be much easier for Samsung and other Android licensees to duplicate it. But the new release leverages a series of technologies that designed to keep iOS 7 an original product.

Emphasis on simple



iOS 7 clearly aims at delivering simplicity. But as Apple notes, "simplicity is quite complicated."

The company's design overview of iOS 7 states, "Simplicity is often equated with minimalism. Yet true simplicity is so much more than just the absence of clutter or the removal of decoration. It?s about offering up the right things, in the right place, right when you need them. It?s about bringing order to complexity. And it?s about making something that always seems to 'just work.' When you pick something up for the first time and already know how to do the things you want to do, that?s simplicity."

There are plenty of simple Android apps that aren't designed well, don't 'just work,' and aren't intuitive to use. Delivering good simple design isn't just about being simple.

Contrast Apple's first major revision to the appearance of iOS with revamps delivered by Google (Android Holo, in version 3.0 for tablets and 4.0 for smartphones, below top) and Microsoft (Windows Phone 8 "Metro," borrowed from the Zune, below bottom). Apple says iOS 7 "brings clarity to the entire experience," and says "conspicuous ornamentation has been stripped away [?] there?s greater focus on what matters most: your content."

Android Holo

Windows Phone


Google's Android Holo appearance is all about the chrome, introducing angular "droid" themed controls. Windows Phone focuses attention on its whimsical typography, tiled boxes design and navigation through OS-centric concepts such as Hubs.

There are certainly elements of iOS 7 that can be linked to portions of Android, WebOS, WP8 or other existing products. But the direction Apple took isn't just a refreshed layer of appearance to bring it into line with the latest design trends.

Further, as Apple notes of its revamping of iOS 7, it has "refined the experience to make it even more effortless and useful. So the everyday things you need to do are the everyday things you want to do. And iOS 7 lets you work in ways that are instantly familiar, so there?s no need to relearn everything."

That's a shot at both Microsoft's radically different Windows Phone / Windows 8 and the inconsistent appearance of devices that make use of Android.

On the corner of technology and Liberal Arts



The layered design approach in iOS 7 exemplifies the leveraging of Apple's compositing graphics prowess that propelled it five years ahead of the status quo twice in the past decade.

In addition to the technical aspects of layering views on top of each other, Apple has also codified a design language to describe how layers should behave. "Distinct and functional layers help create depth and establish hierarchy and order," the company notes.

iOS 7 layers


"The use of translucency provides a sense of context and place. And new approaches to animation and motion make even the simplest tasks more engaging."

Part of this "new approach" is a motion controlled parallax effect that allows you to tilt the device and see an apparent shift between layers.

The company also notes other examples of making iOS 7 more cohesive. While many apps in iOS 6 have the original glossy highlight introduced on the first iPhone (apart from a variety of new apps that don't, such as Maps and Notes), and make use of inconsistent styles and colors, iOS 7 works to bring icon designs into focus.

Apple has been "redrawing every icon around a new grid system" for consistency, "and sticking to a precise color palette" to make the overall OS 7 experience cohesive. "They all work together to create a more harmonious relationship between individual elements," the company states.

Transparent panels for notifications, controls, Siri



Another applied use of layering via the compositing graphics engine in iOS 7 is the use of transparency to reinforce the modality of features like Notification Center (swiped in from the top), Control Center (swiped up from the bottom) and the enhanced new Siri (invoked by double tapping the Home button).

iOS 7 Notification Center

iOS 7 Control Center

iOS 7 Siri


In all three, the use of a translucent background makes it clear you are interacting with a temporary foreground element. All three features were first introduced by other mobile platforms or apps, but Apple integrates and refines them to look and work similarly in iOS 7.

Similar use of transparency to establish a "sense of place" and modality are used in the new iTunes app, such as when editing an iTunes Radio station (below)

iOS 7 iTunes Radio edit


Photos to impress



One last example of the graphics technology Apple is leveraging in iOS 7 is in Photos. In 2007, the original iPhone's ability to display hundreds of rows of photos and quickly zip through the list with a finger swipe was an impressive feat.

Android and other devices long had trouble navigating similar lists smoothly, resulting in the stuttering "lag" that users complain about. Apple addressed the issue with advanced hardware acceleration techniques used throughout the interface to provide an instantly responsive experience.

Now, six years later, Apple has added a new layer of sophistication to the design of Photos that builds upon this concept and the increased graphics capabilities of modern mobile devices. Now, Photos are automatically organized into "Moments" by their date and GPS location metadata.

iOS 7 photos


Further, iOS will back out into a year mode that packs hundreds of photos into the screen. By simply scrubbing over the mini-thumbnails with a touch, you can preview and open specific shots taken months ago. That's as impressive as the original iPhone's photo capabilities were when they debuted.

Google hasn't focused on delivering similar functionality for Android users because there's no ad revenue tied to displaying a user's own personal photos. But on top, Apple also has sophisticated media handling technology associated with its iLife and Pro Apps it can use.

Overall, the design cues of iOS 7 reflect not just an interest in creating an attractive, usable interface, but also the sophistication of the technology Apple now leads in many respects, and which it employs to drive the look and feel of iOS 7's new design.
post #2 of 35
Indeed 1smile.gif
post #3 of 35
Thanks Apple!
post #4 of 35

The OS is very elegant and I believe it will look even better once in your hand.

 

I see why the icons had to be made flat in order to represent the new glass-like layers of the OS better. Only icon that could use improvement is Safari, but at the same time I don't know what they could do with it?

 

Anyway it's funny how Jony Ive and others downed skeuomorphism of past iOSs that made some of the graphical elements look like real life things. Jony Ive essentially made his own skeuomorphic design that make the graphical elements look like layered panes of glass.

post #5 of 35

Another quick note.

 

Who else thinks that the new "Slide to Unlock" is going to confuse a lot of first time users and older people?

post #6 of 35
This is the first time I've seen something this significant from Apple and felt let down.

However, that's an emotional reaction to how it *looks*. The visual design is less important than the way it works, and it looks like everywhere it works better than the past.

Just like the name "Mavericks" it often is the case that you "just don't get it" when you first see something really new from Apple-- how many people didn't get the iPod, the iPhone or the iPad? A hell of a lot of them. (in fact they're still complaining about them, but at least they aren't claiming they will be failures.)

I was a fan of "Sea Lion" as a name, and Mavericks will certainly take awhile. I figure the same is the case for iOS 7.

As a developer, I could install the developer preview but I'm busy working on apps that need to run on iOS 6 and I'm not going to mess with it now.

Still, it looks like it works great... I just don't think I like the looks.
post #7 of 35
Nice write up, DED. I think it would make the point however even if you didn't give so much airtime to WP and Android. You know, focus on simplicity. ;
post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessi View Post

This is the first time I've seen something this significant from Apple and felt let down.

 

 

+1

post #9 of 35

Looks like Apple pulled off another surprise. With the world expecting a "flat" new look for iOS7, Ive delivers a 3D UI instead, or rather 2.5D. 

post #10 of 35
most of iOS 7 can be seen as a 'catch up' with the most useful features of Android, Windows Phone, some "skins," third party apps, and even the bygone Web OS.

but ... then Apple repackages them into its own "just works" smooth UI frameworks and ecosystem. of course we really have to try OS 7 out to know if Apple has pulled it off.

if they did, OS 7 will be the state of the art - not the art of gimmicky bells and whistles, but the art of user satisfaction.
post #11 of 35

Let's face it. A new look will attract some and disappoint others. No style will please everyone. But today is the revelation of a new beginning. Ive is unquestionably the new arbiter of design. And he delivers the way a master designer does - define the design criteria, the constraints, the rules and the process first. Then design the parts and the whole to meet the criteria, within the constraints, using the process and the rules. The design grid for the icons is an example of how this works. Never mind the chatter about flat icons. He first laid down rules in the form of a grid for their design. Like great websites, brochure layouts and other designs, a grid is one of the key foundations for a clean, uniform look.

 

Revisit the history of Apple's hardware and retrace how Ive mastered the use of first plastic and then aluminum with each generation of Macs, iPods and iPhones. Look at how he stuck to the same design language across the entire product line, refining the rounded rectangle to be progressively thinner and lighter. Imagine how he will do this with the UI.

 

The introduction of a unified design language will not only give iOS a true signature look, one that is consistent across core apps, it is also a harbinger for an even more unified future. Imagine how hardware and software will come together in 2014, when Ive will have been working together with Federighi on iOS8 and iPhone 6 for over a year. (Clearly, I don't think there has been enough time for the true integration to be reflected in iPhone 5S and iOS7.) The real advantage of Apple as an integrated system design company will emerge once again. This is how iOS will better Android and the rest, because there will never be the same level of integrated design anywhere else.

 

Like some others, I had doubts when Cook first appointed Ive to oversee the UI. It is clear now that was a stroke of management genius. In less than a year, Ive has not just redesigned the look of iOS, he has more importantly redefined the design process. The foundation is set to evolve the same way his hardware design has evolved. From now on, we have more to look forward to with each iteration of iOS than just new features.


Edited by StruckPaper - 6/10/13 at 6:40pm
post #12 of 35
My total guess is that future iPhones and iPads and the itv will be three d without glasses. The Multi plane patents they hold will allow this when they need it and demand slows in the future.

Pull a new rabbit out of a new hat. Sooner or later it will happen. They are starting to show parts of this with OS7.

An iPhone 6 with 3d would be fun. Especially if their other products could show it without glasses.
post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Hulka View Post

My total guess is that future iPhones and iPads and the itv will be three d without glasses. The Multi plane patents they hold will allow this when they need it and demand slows in the future.

Pull a new rabbit out of a new hat. Sooner or later it will happen. They are starting to show parts of this with OS7.

An iPhone 6 with 3d would be fun. Especially if their other products could show it without glasses.

No. Remember what simplicity is about.


Edited by StruckPaper - 6/10/13 at 6:41pm
post #14 of 35
Props to the review!
I loved what i saw.... And once it hits the market and people actually experience it.. It will blow some socks off!

Congrats Tim, Jhonny , Craig and the apple team.. Awesome !
post #15 of 35

Looks like the clock icon may be dynamic this time around

post #16 of 35

honestly, this UI look like the Chinese version of XiaoMi android.

post #17 of 35
I like Apple, I like iPhone - but it's all copied from other devices. When will they REALLY release something new?!
post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

Let's face it. A new look will attract some and disappoint others. No style will please everyone. But today is the revelation of a new beginning. Ive is unquestionably the new arbiter of design. And he delivers the way a master designer does - define the design criteria, the constraints, the rules and the process first. Then design the parts and the whole to meet the criteria, within the constraints, using the process and the rules. The design grid for the icons is an example of how this works. Never mind the chatter about flat icons. He first laid down rules in the form of a grid for their design. Like great websites, brochure layouts and other designs, a grid is one of the key foundations for a clean, uniform look.

 

Revisit the history of Apple's hardware and retrace how Ive mastered the use of first plastic and then aluminum with each generation of Macs, iPods and iPhones. Look at how he stuck to the same design language across the entire product line, refining the rounded rectangle to be progressively thinner and lighter. Imagine how he will do this with the UI.

 

The introduction of a unified design language will not only give iOS a true signature look, one that is consistent across core apps, it is also a harbinger for an even more unified future. Imagine how hardware and software will come together in 2014, when Ive will have been working together with Federighi on iOS8 and iPhone 6 for over a year. (Clearly, I don't think there has been enough time for the true integration to be reflected in iPhone 5S and iOS7.) The real advantage of Apple as an integrated system design company will emerge once again. This is how iOS will better Android and the rest, because there will never be the same level of integrated design anywhere else.

 

Like some others, I had doubts when Cook first appointed Ive to oversee the UI. It is clear now that was a stroke of management genius. In less than a year, Ive has not just redesigned the look of iOS, he has more importantly redefined the design process. The foundation is set to evolve the same way his hardware design has evolved. From now on, we have more to look forward to with each iteration of iOS than just new features.

 

The foundation is fine and well, and may actually pay off in the future. Currently, iOS7 doesn't have the unification and consistency you are talking about.

 

My first impression was very positive. I was swayed by the presentation. Everyone was so happy, funny and cocksure. And frankly, I wanted to like the new design. But I've been playing with iOS7 since then, and am quite surprised by the seemingly unfinished design. I am referring specifically to the icons. Some of them look like they were put together on Sunday night. Hell, the camera icon is different in different places. What's with the icon for Game Center? Maybe it follows the grid, but it does not follow any unified theme used in the design of others. What is the common design language between the icons for iMessage, Game Center, Camera, Photos and Music? Is there a common color scheme? Did the designer of the Newstand icon not talk to the others? Did the designer of the Weather icon actually open up and use the app? Did Ive or anyone else have a chance to look at the home screen before Monday morning?

 

I agree that it *looks* have laid a strong foundation. I agree Ive has not fallen flat on his face (but only if you think carefully about how little time he has had). I like where they are going but they sure aren't there yet. Man, they have lots of work left to do. This confirms all the rumors about iOS7 running *behind*. The fact that they do not have beta versions for iPad yet is further proof of this.

 

I hope and believe this will look different by the time they ship iPhone 5S.


Edited by stelligent - 6/11/13 at 12:01am
post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by werdnanotroh View Post

I like Apple, I like iPhone - but it's all copied from other devices. When will they REALLY release something new?!
 

You either forgot the sarcasm tag or you just don't get it, The article clearly states a lot of the pieces aren't new but are put together in such a way that things are consistent and 'just work' together better.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools." Douglas Adams

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post #20 of 35
And the prize for some of the longest sentences in history goes to%u2026 an English teacher would have a field day here.
post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by werdnanotroh View Post

I like Apple, I like iPhone - but it's all copied from other devices. When will they REALLY release something new?!

-1

Oh, this fall, in case you didn't know.
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post #22 of 35
Quote:

Originally Posted by stelligent View Post
 

My first impression was very positive. I was swayed by the presentation. Everyone was so happy, funny and cocksure. And frankly, I wanted to like the new design. But I've been playing with iOS7 since then, and am quite surprised by the seemingly unfinished design. I am referring specifically to the icons. Some of them look like they were put together on Sunday night. Hell, the camera icon is different in different places. What's with the icon for Game Center? Maybe it follows the grid, but it does not follow any unified theme used in the design of others. What is the common design language between the icons for iMessage, Game Center, Camera, Photos and Music? Is there a common color scheme? Did the designer of the Newstand icon not talk to the others? Did the designer of the Weather icon actually open up and use the app? Did Ive or anyone else have a chance to look at the home screen before Monday morning?

 

I completely agree about the icons. Many of them are just atrocious, Newstand being the biggest offender. Whose 5-year-old kid created that design? Granted, the current empty wooden bookshelf icon is just as hideous. The white background icons look really bad. And yes, there doesn't seem to be any sort of common design language between the icons and many don't scream out anything regarding functionality. What do colored blobs have to do with Game Center (yes, I know the app uses that bubble motif but nothing about it screams games)? What does the rainbow spiral art have to do with photos? Why do most of the icons have a gradient but some don't? At least the new Maps icon doesn't give directions to drive off an overpass anymore.

 

And the first picture with the 3 iPhones side-by-side. The new design makes everything look washed out. It took me a while to realize what the design reminded me of: It looks a lot like Google's redesign of Gmail. I hope it all looks better in person because it doesn't really impress in static images. I'm glad they decided to steal be inspired by WebOS's card motif for app switching along with being able to swipe back (which was a feature I really missed when I switched from the Pre 2 to the iPhone 4S).

post #23 of 35
Looks like Android now. This is a good thing for usability most likely. I always found iOS hard to use and confusing. If the iPhone ever becomes the better product I'm ready to try it. Still, it doesn't look even close to a Samsung phone in terms of meeting my use case requirements though.
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post #24 of 35
I consider Apple products premium products hand made and meticulously crafted. Now with the skeuomorphic design elimination it puts a Yugo interior in a Rolls Royce. I loved the look and feel of Hand tooled leather and three dimensional icons this new interface appears very sterile and cold compared to the warmth of the previous interface.
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post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by werdnanotroh View Post

I like Apple, I like iPhone - but it's all copied from other devices. When will they REALLY release something new?!

Wrong... considering those devices copied from Apple first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post



I'm glad they decided to steal be inspired by WebOS's card motif for app switching along with being able to swipe back (which was a feature I really missed when I switched from the Pre 2 to the iPhone 4S).

You realize that the guy that created WebOS also worked at Apple on hypercard... which did the card metaphor first, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquatic View Post

Looks like Android now. This is a good thing for usability most likely. I always found iOS hard to use and confusing. If the iPhone ever becomes the better product I'm ready to try it. Still, it doesn't look even close to a Samsung phone in terms of meeting my use case requirements though.

With or without a new design... the iPhone is still way ahead of any Samsung phone in terms of ease of use and usability... by a huge margin.

BTW: The use of Helvetica and the strict, open layout using white space is maybe something Americans are not used to. However it is the very basis of most of the design in Europe now for decades, and is known as "The Swiss School of Design" or simply "Swiss Style". It is taught in all major Art and Design Schools. Many would say it's home is in Basel, I however prefer the Dutch approach better.

Jony Ive is well schooled in this, as it relates to immersive communicative design as a whole. I personally was expecting nothing less from him, and yes, he has added his "fingerprint" aesthetic style to the whole package. He is beyond reproach or equal as being the trend-setting craftsman designer of our age. Kids will be studying him (if they're not already!) in ever design school in the world some day.

Also: no... neither Microsoft nor Google started the trend. The resurgence started around 2004-5 within the fashion, auto, telecom, and industrial/furnishings industries here in Europe. I'm 99% sure that Jony had many a long discussion with SJ... and head-butting with Forstall over their insistance on throwing kitsch onto his close to perfect industrial designed products.

Unfortunately, it took them both to leave before Jony Ive could realize his "complete design"... so don't think for a moment that "Apple" or Jony Ive "copied" anyone! He most surely hasn't taken his cues from ANY of the other designers most of you are familiar with in America. 1rolleyes.gif

Oh... and don't think I'm putting American designers down... not in the least. Certain styles like Grunge, Surfer-60's, Western-Chic, Retro-Rock, even Shaker Country-Plaid-n-Paisley have their place in my design book. Just not on a phone or tablet... and absolutely NOT on anything Jony Ive creates for Apple.
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post #26 of 35
If anyone is interested:

You can see the Swiss Style timeline here (look at 1954 for an example of using overlapping color and dots) http://smearedblackink.com/swiss_style_timeline/

Also... a great documentary entitled Helvetica (2007) is worth anyone's time , let alone a must-see if you're a designer... or would like to discuss design. If nothing else, check out the trailer... and take note of the year it came out.

Again, MS nor Google created this design movement. In fact Microsoft's attempt is downright amateur.
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post #27 of 35
One last post and I'm outa here:

Apple has been using a generous amount of white space and Helvetica (and variants) i.e Swiss Design for years now in their advertising, packaging, website, manuals, and stores*, etc.

How is it that people can't relate that to what Jony is doing with iOS, and bringing the whole design language full circle?

If he's copying anything, it's what Apple has already been doing since the iPod came out... and I can't refrain from saying, absolutely copying NOTHING from anyone or anything else. He is "iterating and refining" Apple's style using tried and true design principles based on the Swiss style. Nothing more... and nothing less.

*Added*
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post #28 of 35
Originally Posted by werdnanotroh View Post
I like Apple, I like iPhone - but it's all copied from other devices. When will they REALLY release something new?!

 

When people say things like this, I just imagine Jony Ive going, "Oh, shut up!", sounding exactly like Sean Bean in whatever movie that was… 

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post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

 

The foundation is fine and well, and may actually pay off in the future. Currently, iOS7 doesn't have the unification and consistency you are talking about.

 

My first impression was very positive. I was swayed by the presentation. Everyone was so happy, funny and cocksure. And frankly, I wanted to like the new design. But I've been playing with iOS7 since then, and am quite surprised by the seemingly unfinished design. I am referring specifically to the icons. Some of them look like they were put together on Sunday night. Hell, the camera icon is different in different places. What's with the icon for Game Center? Maybe it follows the grid, but it does not follow any unified theme used in the design of others. What is the common design language between the icons for iMessage, Game Center, Camera, Photos and Music? Is there a common color scheme? Did the designer of the Newstand icon not talk to the others? Did the designer of the Weather icon actually open up and use the app? Did Ive or anyone else have a chance to look at the home screen before Monday morning?

 

I agree that it *looks* have laid a strong foundation. I agree Ive has not fallen flat on his face (but only if you think carefully about how little time he has had). I like where they are going but they sure aren't there yet. Man, they have lots of work left to do. This confirms all the rumors about iOS7 running *behind*. The fact that they do not have beta versions for iPad yet is further proof of this.

 

I hope and believe this will look different by the time they ship iPhone 5S.


I personally think they will be tweaking the look as well over the coming months because you are not alone in your assessment.  This is a new way of doing things for Apple because under Jobs, thing would not see the light of day until it was perfect.  This whole 'public beta - let's see how everyone reacts and adjust' style of doing things is very different for Apple but one that I think is good.

post #30 of 35

iOS 7 reminds me alot of MIUI, which is a Chinese Android ROM that borrows alot of 'inspiration' from iOS, but also has Android design elements.  http://en.miui.com/features.php

 

Most of the new elements in iOS 7 seems to have come from Android, with a small selection from WebOS and WP8... 

post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

You either forgot the sarcasm tag or you just don't get it, The article clearly states a lot of the pieces aren't new but are put together in such a way that things are consistent and 'just work' together better.


Doesn't change the fact that the blinder wearing people on this site actually believe that Apple created all these 'new' features.  I think he was pointing out that these features have been in other phones already for a number of years and that he was looking for something new, not lifted and refined.

 

The AirDrop concept is nice but the rest of the world knows it as Wifi Direct and it's been around as well.  iOS 7 is about incorporating features to keep up with the market but it is mainly about addressing users complaints about the UI design.  Hoping they change the default colours because I'm not that into pastels and I already ate my Easter chocolate.

post #32 of 35
Apple's new design isn't exactly flat. I am not a fan of flat design and was really surprised when all the rumor sites were saying apple was going to adopt it. My problem with flat in general is that you loose visual cues like something is a buttons if they are too flat. Much of the flat design out there also looks cartoony like it was designed by fisher price. (People here think the new icons look like five years made them.) A couple of months ago I commented on a site that removing skeomorphism is not the same thing as flat. Apple's design is clean and simplified but it isn't flat. There is so much depth added to their concept like transparency and the 3D affect when you move the phone. Those buttons really stand out from the surface and there is little doubt they are buttons. On the new WWDC app buttons on the top still have depth with a very faint gradient. This is a HUGE improvement over anything Microsoft's Metro did.
post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by zippy2shoes View Post


Doesn't change the fact that the blinder wearing people on this site actually believe that Apple created all these 'new' features.  I think he was pointing out that these features have been in other phones already for a number of years and that he was looking for something new, not lifted and refined.

The AirDrop concept is nice but the rest of the world knows it as Wifi Direct and it's been around as well.  iOS 7 is about incorporating features to keep up with the market but it is mainly about addressing users complaints about the UI design.  Hoping they change the default colours because I'm not that into pastels and I already ate my Easter chocolate.

What blinders... or are you talking about your own inability to open your friggin' eyes and possibly use your beloved Google to find out the very fact that none of the stuff in Windows or Android... or even Nokia of the 2000's is "new".

Airdrop is NOT a concept. It is as you say, Wifi Direct that will actually work without jumping through hoops, "bumping", or egads... "squirting" on/at each other.

It now has a universal understandable and usable name in public... that I would bet a Benjamin... others will try to emulate in one way or other to redefine... uh... squirting. 1oyvey.gif
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post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeb85 View Post

iOS 7 reminds me alot of MIUI, which is a Chinese Android ROM that borrows alot of 'inspiration' from iOS, but also has Android design elements.  http://en.miui.com/features.php

Most of the new elements in iOS 7 seems to have come from Android, with a small selection from WebOS and WP8... 

Not a single one! Seriously.

MUIIIUIIIUII: Get a load of that "inspirational" design. You really want to say that it's simply "inspired"? Really? 1oyvey.gif

Specifically what "elements"? Most of the icons have appeared on an Apple device, packaging or literature for at least a decade, and some of them on toasters, coffee machines, and radios for 60 years or longer. Ever hear of a company by the name of Braun, Krupps or Blaupunkt? Didn't think so.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfkindc View Post

Apple's new design isn't exactly flat. I am not a fan of flat design and was really surprised when all the rumor sites were saying apple was going to adopt it. My problem with flat in general is that you loose visual cues like something is a buttons if they are too flat. Much of the flat design out there also looks cartoony like it was designed by fisher price. (People here think the new icons look like five years made them.) A couple of months ago I commented on a site that removing skeomorphism is not the same thing as flat. Apple's design is clean and simplified but it isn't flat. There is so much depth added to their concept like transparency and the 3D affect when you move the phone

 

How ironic, isn't it? With the world expecting Ive's take on flat and he gives us a 2.5D interface instead.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfkindc View Post

Those buttons really stand out from the surface and there is little doubt they are buttons. On the new WWDC app buttons on the top still have depth with a very faint gradient. This is a HUGE improvement over anything Microsoft's Metro did.
 

Like others, now that I have looked at it up close and personal, my enthusiasm has tempered a bit. In particular, I disagree that the buttons stand out. I'd say they stand out in some places but not in others. As someone suggested, this looks unfinished. The next 3 months will see few vacations for iOS engineers at Cupertino. They will be working overtime, fuelled by the inspiration from Cook's Designed in California video, coffee and Federighi's sense of humor.

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