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iOS 7 beta: Developers, Sen. McCain applaud App Store auto-updates

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
Apple tweaked a lot of things for its forthcoming iOS 7 update, but there is one move in particular that has drawn cheers not only from the crowd of developers at WWDC, but from the halls of Congress: auto-updates for App Store software.

mccain


Among the many changes announced with the unveiling of iOS 7 was the addition of automatic updates, which drew big applause from the crowd of developers, Apple fans, and press at Moscone Center. U.S. Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) also added his own voice to the chorus, tweeting his appreciation of Apple finally resolving what had for him been a pet peeve.

"Thanks to Tim Cook for the automatic iphone [sic] app updates!" McCain posted on Monday.

McCain's tweet hearkens back to a complaint the senator made in his closing remarks during a hearing on Apple's taxes held on Capitol Hill. The senior senator from Arizona repeatedly expressed his belief that Apple's policy of routing its overseas revenues through an Irish subsidiary amounted to tax avoidance.

Throughout his statements and questioning, though, McCain remained polite to Apple CEO Tim Cook and the other Apple executives in attendance. He and the other senators on the panel repeatedly expressed their admiration not only for Apple's products, but for the company itself, as well as its founder and current leaders. Ending his remarks, McCain struck a light tone.

"I'm out of time," the senator said to Cook, "what I really wanted to ask is why the hell I have to keep updating the apps on my iPhone all the time, and why you don't fix that."

The remark drew laughs from the hearing's attendees, including Cook, who responded, "Sir, we're trying to make them better all the time."



While Apple largely reinvented the smartphone market ? giving it a much more app-centric focus in the process ? the iPhone maker has been somewhat late to the game with regard to certain automation aspects. The ability to have apps automatically update is one of those aspects, as that feature has been built into iOS' main rival, Android, for some time.

The announcement of automatically updating apps for iOS 7 received one of the larger rounds of applause during Monday's keynote presentation. The Apple executives that took the stage made sure to point out that the update would contain scores of other new features.
post #2 of 59
I was half expecting Craig or Tim to specifically call the auto-update the "Senator McCain feature".
post #3 of 59
It allowed Apple to scale up its datacenters first.
post #4 of 59
Funny. Good news story.

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
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post #5 of 59
That's great, and should be the default, but before iOS 7 ships, let us turn it off, and/or revert to older app versions.

Too many games that I pad for went free later and either added ads, or else make you pay again by IAP to unlock to same content I bought with the app to begin with. I understand the dilemmas faced by developers--it's not always easy to pay the rent--but that's not cool! So I read the update reviews and skip those updates.
post #6 of 59
I was right lol.
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #7 of 59
I hope this is optional. I don't want to update over 3G automatically.
post #8 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

That's great, and should be the default, but before iOS 7 ships, let us turn it off, and/or revert to older app versions.

Too many games that I pad for went free later and either added ads, or else make you pay again by IAP to unlock to same content I bought with the app to begin with. I understand the dilemmas faced by developers--it's not always easy to pay the rent--but that's not cool! So I read the update reviews and skip those updates.

It can be turned off already in the first beta, and as long as you keep a backup of the older version on your computer, you can always revert to an older version of the app.

post #9 of 59
I actually misunderstood the original story, because I didn't realize iPhones apps couldn't auto-update. I just thought McCain -- infamous for his techno-cluelessness in 2008 -- was complaining because of the automatic updates streaming in and installing themselves (which can be a distraction, if minor). I'd assumed that iPhones, like others, had been auto-updating their apps all along. Learn something new every day. Hopefully.
post #10 of 59

Next up: delta updates? 

 

Please? 1smile.gif

post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

I hope this is optional.
Agreed. There are some updates that remove features I want to keep. Shazam comes to mind.
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post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

While Apple largely reinvented the smartphone market ? giving it a much more app-centric focus in the process ? the iPhone maker has been somewhat late to the game with regard to certain automation aspects. The ability to have apps automatically update is one of those aspects, as that feature has been built into iOS' main rival, Android, for some time.

Android had this before iOS? How is that possible, they copied Apple and added a feature themselves¿ Oh I get it, they didn't need to spend 2.5 years tinkering how to create the next great thing, so had all the time in the world to come up with something on their own.

Wow. Android - it really never seizes to amaze me. And that's not a positive thing to say.
Android seems to be an illiterate product, as they only have numbers to show for.
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Android seems to be an illiterate product, as they only have numbers to show for.
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post #13 of 59
Being to able to select automatic or manual updating would be great. Personally I like the current process since I can see ahead of time what new and improved features are being added to apps. I guess a splash screen after an update could accomplish the same, but sometimes new features will spur me to again use apps that I stopped using if I didn't find them that useful.
post #14 of 59
Thanks for the confirmation. I will turn off. There are certain apps I don't want to update. Like McTube Pro, the resent update removed the ability to download YouTube video.
post #15 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

It can be turned off already in the first beta, and as long as you keep a backup of the older version on your computer, you can always revert to an older version of the app.
Thanks for the confirmation. I will turn off. There are certain apps I don't want to update. Like McTube Pro, the resent update removed the ability to download YouTube video.
post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ks2problema View Post

I actually misunderstood the original story, because I didn't realize iPhones apps couldn't auto-update. I just thought McCain -- infamous for his techno-cluelessness in 2008 -- was complaining because of the automatic updates streaming in and installing themselves (which can be a distraction, if minor). I'd assumed that iPhones, like others, had been auto-updating their apps all along. Learn something new every day. Hopefully.

 

Oh, yes, didn't you know us Apple users and especially developers are using steam from coal to power our devices? It's heartwarming to know some of you lucky guys live at starship Enterprise...

post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Android had this before iOS? How is that possible, they copied Apple and added a feature themselves¿ Oh I get it, they didn't need to spend 2.5 years tinkering how to create the next great thing, so had all the time in the world to come up with something on their own.

Wow. Android - it really never seizes to amaze me. And that's not a positive thing to say.

 

 

person that is not complete moron would know the feature had to do everything with infrastructure and bandwidth  at Apple sites. Same person would also know this is not really a heartbreaking feature.

post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

That's great, and should be the default, but before iOS 7 ships, let us turn it off, and/or revert to older app versions.

Too many games that I pad for went free later and either added ads, or else make you pay again by IAP to unlock to same content I bought with the app to begin with. I understand the dilemmas faced by developers--it's not always easy to pay the rent--but that's not cool! So I read the update reviews and skip those updates.

 

In all fairness this is something that only techie types care about at all.  It's also something that requires a significant amount of "managing" to the point that even for that small techie group, it's mostly a losing game.  

 

Just relax and let the people that write the apps control their own apps.  Then vote with your dollars.  

post #19 of 59
Better late than never at least Apples listening albeit with only one ear
post #20 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

In all fairness this is something that only techie types care about at all.  It's also something that requires a significant amount of "managing" to the point that even for that small techie group, it's mostly a losing game.  

 

Just relax and let the people that write the apps control their own apps.  Then vote with your dollars.  

As mentioned above it is not always a good time to download a bunch of large apps such as when you are on your cellular data plan or in the middle of some other activity that would make it inconvenient to download apps. Fortunately, according to a beta tester posted above, there is a way to turn the automatic update feature off which means that there will be some management involved and perhaps it should always be left in the off position if just for the data plan issue. That will certainly be the case for me so the feature is mostly useless in that situation.

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post #21 of 59

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Agreed. There are some updates that remove features I want to keep. Shazam comes to mind.

 

I know sometimes we want to keep the old app features and not update the app, but eventually the old app won't work because the developer removed those features from the server and the app has no way of getting the information it needs.
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

That's great, and should be the default, but before iOS 7 ships, let us turn it off, and/or revert to older app versions.

Too many games that I pad for went free later and either added ads, or else make you pay again by IAP to unlock to same content I bought with the app to begin with. I understand the dilemmas faced by developers--it's not always easy to pay the rent--but that's not cool! So I read the update reviews and skip those updates.

 

In all fairness this is something that only techie types care about at all.  It's also something that requires a significant amount of "managing" to the point that even for that small techie group, it's mostly a losing game.  

 

Just relax and let the people that write the apps control their own apps.  Then vote with your dollars.  

 

The only problem is sometimes you have to vote with those dollars BEFORE they downgrade your app. How do you take back your vote after a bait and switch?

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post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post


person that is not complete moron would know the feature had to do everything with infrastructure and bandwidth  at Apple sites. Same person would also know this is not really a heartbreaking feature.

It could easily have been given the option to only auto-update when on wifi.
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post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

It could easily have been given the option to only auto-update when on wifi.

Even that is not good enough because a person could be on untrusted free unencrypted wifi (stupid but possible) and by entering your Apple ID it could be snagged by a hacker. Which BTW don't some updates require a password? How does that work automatically?

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post #25 of 59

The perfect solution will be to let user select which apps can be automatic updated. 

post #26 of 59

1smile.gif

 

The moment I heard that feature I thought of the senator! good for him.

post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ks2problema View Post

I actually misunderstood the original story, because I didn't realize iPhones apps couldn't auto-update. I just thought McCain -- infamous for his techno-cluelessness in 2008 -- was complaining because of the automatic updates streaming in and installing themselves (which can be a distraction, if minor). I'd assumed that iPhones, like others, had been auto-updating their apps all along. Learn something new every day. Hopefully.

I think the confusion is in the terminolgy: they DO "auto-update", they just ask permission first. Now that will all be done in the background with permission granted being the default. 

 

That asking for permission is what McCain was complaining about, he, like many, aren't happy about being "nagged", and Apple is very active in having apps update.


Edited by jfc1138 - 6/11/13 at 10:39am
post #28 of 59

Even when Congress was drilling Apple, Apple would not give up secrets, It would have been easy for Cook to say to McCain it is coming in the next release. Apple true to form,

post #29 of 59

This BETTER darn well be an option and not forced. What stops developers from just removing features willy nilly now? What stops them from injecting monitoring code now?

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post #30 of 59

Isn't John McCain the technologically illiterate person who never uses email and is not even online? That was the case at least a few years ago.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/uselection2008/johnmccain/2403704/John-McCain-technology-illiterate-doesnt-email-or-use-internet.html

 

What the hell does he know about auto updates, and if that's a good thing or not?

 

As for me, I was happy with the way that the system already works. The user updates when they want to. I can think of certain situations where forced updates is undesirable. Politicians in general don't know crap about technology, and they should stick to what they do best, which usually involves some sort of lying to the American people, wasting money and pushing through laws that are bad for Americans.

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

This BETTER darn well be an option and not forced. What stops developers from just removing features willy nilly now? What stops them from injecting monitoring code now?

Updates still go through the approval process.
post #32 of 59
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post
Updates still go through the approval process.

 

And the approval process is fine with taking away functionality.

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post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

And the approval process is fine with taking away functionality.

 

And with the developer installing ads.

 

That's the primary reason why I don't let some apps update themselves.

 

(On Android, you can set auto-update permissions per app.)

post #34 of 59
How appropriate that Mac OS X has been renamed to Mavericks.
And Apple is lighting-up the Google Trends display today... "AAPL", "iOS 7", "Mac Pro", "MacRumors"
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Isn't John McCain the technologically illiterate person who never uses email and is not even online? That was the case at least a few years ago.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/uselection2008/johnmccain/2403704/John-McCain-technology-illiterate-doesnt-email-or-use-internet.html

 

What the hell does he know about auto updates, and if that's a good thing or not?

 

As for me, I was happy with the way that the system already works. The user updates when they want to. I can think of certain situations where forced updates is undesirable. Politicians in general don't know crap about technology, and they should stick to what they do best, which usually involves some sort of lying to the American people, wasting money and pushing through laws that are bad for Americans.

When you have minions doing everything for you up to and including cutting the crust off your bread having to actually hit a button to authorize app updates is just too much of a burden you see.


Edited by jfc1138 - 6/11/13 at 11:26am
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post


person that is not complete moron would know the feature had to do everything with infrastructure and bandwidth  at Apple sites. Same person would also know this is not really a heartbreaking feature.

i'm a "not complete moron" and i don't know that. how do you "know" that? or are you assuming? do you have a source that corroborates your claim?
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post #37 of 59

Better late than never.

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post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post


i'm a "not complete moron" and i don't know that. how do you "know" that? or are you assuming? do you have a source that corroborates your claim?

 

where is source of your original claim? just a wild guess that Apple is just a bunch of outdated idiots? well, guess again...:)

post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Even that is not good enough because a person could be on untrusted free unencrypted wifi (stupid but possible) and by entering your Apple ID it could be snagged by a hacker. Which BTW don't some updates require a password? How does that work automatically?

Encryption is the job of the devices, not the pipeline. If apple encrypts the signal between device and server then nobody listening in between those two points will get any useable data.

And no, I don't think I've been asked for a password to update apps since I upgraded to iOS 6.
post #40 of 59
Using a 1st-gen (June 2012) Retina 15" and this works okay on a new partition. Do NOT install on your current drive (meaning... update from 10.6-10.8) because like iOS 7, this is fairly difficult to work on unless you are not a power-user. I just installed iOS 7 on my iPhone 5 and half of the App Store apps (iWork, new games, Facebook, YouTube, etc.) don't open after install. Very buggy gestures, taps that don't register, crashing from apps... don't waste your time with that. I'd wait another three months for a September release. I can confirm that unlike iOS 7, the Mavericks DP1 does not need a developer account as you don't "register" for verified activation like you would on an iOS device.

A brief first-look at this: As this is a beta, there ARE indeed compatibility issues (Office does not work at all, Adobe software is sluggish and slow and sometimes, there are little graphical glitches occurring across the screen, as all expected from a beta). I highly suggest that you refrain from using this as your main operating system unless you ABSOLUTELY must need the iBooks and Maps functionality. Otherwise, a quarter of the functionalities don't work properly... it's just for developing Mac Apps and messing with system files. Unless you need either of these options, stick with whatever you currently have (Snow Leopard to Mountain Lion). Not worth it, in my opinion.
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