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Inside iOS 7: Animations work with flat graphics to create sense of space - Page 2

post #41 of 76

i always find comments bemusing that are essentially about personal prejudices, individual likes/dislikes, and pet peeves/fixations. rant on!

but as to analysis ...

it is clearly true that most of the new/improved built-in features of iOS 7 are "catch up" implementations of popular/worthwhile features of other OS' and/or third party apps. and after all, it would be very stupid of Apple not to do that, and there are maybe two dozen of these in iOS 7 - a lot. but the key question for all of them is whether their iOS implementation and UI is as good as or even better than the original, or at least more convenient to use.

and then there are the several new features that are real "advancements" - important evolutionary steps forward (that other OS' will likely match next time). iOS 7 has some - Find My iPhone security, iOS in the Car (when it is deployed), unified game controller API's, and a few others.

lastly would be real "innovations" that break new ground for portable computing (like Siri did for iOS 6). i don't see any of these in iOS 7 - yet (the next iPhone may still add something that is hardware based, like fingerprint passwords). which likely explains the tepid response of many to it.

btw, the entire Apple ecosystem, including OS X Mavericks, should be a part of any analysis. a number of "catch ups" and "advancements" to Apple's cloud ecosystem were announced too, but no "innovations" (like AirPlay proved to be).

Finally then, there is the "packaging" - the look/feel/style of the UI. this is what has been getting most of the attention this past week. what AI is mainly writing about in this post is the well-known Apple "polish" - careful attention to all the little details - that sets its packaging apart from all the rest. what many are complaining about is instead its superficial style - icon design and colors, etc. (which are very easy to change).

not being a developer, i don't have my hands on iOS 7 yet. ask me what i think later this year when i do. All together, it may prove to be a great leap ahead - if the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. but the superficial style is the least important to me, personally.

post #42 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by daewalker View Post

iOS7 - Ugly icons except for the "Settings" icon.

Congrats on liking the worst icon the most.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #43 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

I like the new interface a lot. To me, the phone should be fun.

To me the phone should be usable. iOS7 is a step back for the most parts.
post #44 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


Congrats on liking the worst icon the most.

 

By Royal Decree I declare the worst icon to be the Safari icon (not just on iOS, but across all platforms, I dislike the compass metaphor). Now let's duel. ;-)

 

Opinions are funny things, more often than not they're intended to be used as weapons against those with contradictory opinions in the never ending petty squabbles over human supremacy, however in reality they revert back to their base value and merely effuse mass ignorance. This icon issue is a perfect example.

post #45 of 76
I haven't used iOS 7 and will not be spending my 100$ for an unfinished software. My advice for all of you is if you don't develop an app, simply don't download it. It's not ready for daily use. Also, I don't get the people who whine about the icons. I like them, but that's not the thing. You have to look at the UI as a whole; not just the icons. The important question you have to ask is, "Do the icons, background, animations, etc complement each other?" If they do so, then shut up. I think that's what Ive was thinking while designing iOS 7. Please don't criticize an OS or a phone just by looking at its icons. And if you are not happy with them, simply don't update your iPhone when it is released or don't download the beta. End of the discussion.
post #46 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamlondon View Post

By Royal Decree I declare the worst icon to be the Safari icon (not just on iOS, but across all platforms, I dislike the compass metaphor). Now let's duel ;-)

I agree with you too. I like the icons but not Safari's. It makes you think that there wasn't any work put on it.
post #47 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


Congrats on liking the worst icon the most.

Congrats on having no taste. You must like the Safari icon.

post #48 of 76

I would like to have seen all the icons have the appearance of aluminum (like the Settings icon)... then make the iPhone entirely out of aluminum... like a thin brick of aluminum, simple and clean. It would match the design of the Macbooks and Mac Mini and also gives it that premium aesthetic, like a Mercedes Benz. :) But that's just my opinion and design is very subjective.

post #49 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aliy155 View Post

I haven't used iOS 7 and will not be spending my 100$ for an unfinished software. My advice for all of you is if you don't develop an app, simply don't download it. It's not ready for daily use. Also, I don't get the people who whine about the icons. I like them, but that's not the thing. You have to look at the UI as a whole; not just the icons. The important question you have to ask is, "Do the icons, background, animations, etc complement each other?" If they do so, then shut up. I think that's what Ive was thinking while designing iOS 7. Please don't criticize an OS or a phone just by looking at its icons. And if you are not happy with them, simply don't update your iPhone when it is released or don't download the beta. End of the discussion.

 

You strike me as some kid who doesn't know anything of which they speak.  

You say you "haven't used it," but then tell us that it's "not ready for daily use."  How would you know?  I guess ignorance and prescience are the same thing for you?  

Your "shut up" comment, apart from being rude, tells us you know nothing about design either ("ugly" icons are okay if they match other ugly parts of the OS? Seriously?)

post #50 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post


What evidence do you have to support that?

You said it yourself. You merely "understand" that the old slide to unlock (as in designed 7 or more years ago) had that purpose.

You thereby assume that an easier slide to unlock = people unlocking and butt dialing all day long.

These are the kinda of thoughtless posts that contribute nothing in the form of educated analysis, or even opinion. It's just a summary of what you were once told, what you see now, and the zero-effort conclusion you drew, without a single moment spared for original thought.

Do ya think....maybe....at some point in designing iOS 7....this point came up??

Relax. They have a clue what they're doing.

 

Actually he's completely right about that and the source is Steve Jobs himself at the original iPhone introduction.  

This is exactly how the slider was introduced and described, as a method to stop the phone "going off" in your pocket.  

post #51 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Actually he's completely right about that and the source is Steve Jobs himself at the original iPhone introduction.  
This is exactly how the slider was introduced and described, as a method to stop the phone "going off" in your pocket.  

I know that, buddy. My point was that it is beyond unintelligible to just assume that the "new" slide to unlock is somehow inherently flawed, because it is NOT the same as iPhone 2007 style.

I repeat....is it possible.....at some point....Apple actually tested whether something less challenging was just as practical/secure?

I think so.
post #52 of 76
There are plenty of annoyances in current iOS software that I hope get fixed with iOS 7. Like stupid tab refreshes in iOS. I'll be posting something on a website, switch to another tab and when I come back I've lost everything I was posting because the damn page refreshed. It happens all the time. Having quick access to commonly used settings....why in the world doesn't iOS have this now? That's the thing I'm looking most forward to in iOS 7 - quickly being apple to turn Bluetooth or wifi on/off. And notification center providing useful, contextual information. Thank you Apple. Maybe they won't let Google run away with that space after all. Plus being able to access both from lock screen is a very welcome addition and makes the lock screen much more useful. Airdrop is the perfect answer to Samsung's silly bumping phones to share. And multitasking....how awesome it will be to open an app like downcast and have all my new podcasts downloaded without me having to manually refresh the app. Yeah baby!

The UI on iOS 7 still needs some work to be sure but this looks to be one of the best iOS updates in terms of features and functionality. Steve Jobs might not have approved but that doesn't mean he would have been right. I'm glad Cook & Co are doing what they think is right and not being paralyzed constantly asking themselves what Steve would do or if Steve would have approved.
post #53 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Congrats on liking the worst icon the most.

You're getting to be bloody tiresome. Get off it. We know how you 'feel.' And a lot of us think that's quite irrelevant.
post #54 of 76
Inject some testosterone into this OS and it will be fine. Otherwise a very large male demographic will be lost. That said, I've been using this since the beta was released and it has some awesome features.
post #55 of 76
Frankly, it seems cluttered, vague, and hard to look at/read. Too much brightness/white space, not enough object distinction, too flat, fonts are too thin, and it's going to CRAWL on an iPhone 4. I can't afford a new phone just to update the OS. This is how they do their planned obsolescence. Free OS updates encourage people to slow down their devices so they feel inclined toward buying an upgraded device.

I'm not looking forward to this at all. There wasn't a single practical feature that jumped out at me, but there's lots of eye candy and change for the sake of change. I don't see anything that actually helps the users in here. It reminds me of Android and WinRT, not iPhone. iPhone has all this iconic real estate taken in pop culture and they're going to obsolete it all with this update. That will reduce the iconic nature of the product.

This is the first time I've ever felt negative about an iOS update after its presentation.
post #56 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by james0378 View Post

Inject some testosterone into this OS and it will be fine. Otherwise a very large male demographic will be lost. That said, I've been using this since the beta was released and it has some awesome features.

 

Perhaps they need to sell iOS devices alongside weapons, farm equipment, military apparel and guns, or the lock screen should profile one of those baby eating dogs with a studded leather collar with a human bone in its mouth; why not just be more blatant and have the lock screen display a vagina (or would that seem as the opposite, too feminine, in which case a penis would be perceived as being more masculine on a lock screen?? but that wouldn't work for obvious reasons either).

 

Do you mean colours, or is there something more generally feminine about this new *software*, *Software*, *SOFTWARE*?! When did software (except that which is dedicated to the search for sanitary napkins, birth control pills and bras) become so prone to gender and/or sexual identity?

 

Is it colours (as I've seen so many neanderthals mention in the past week)? Didn't we all leave behind us along with our baby booties (which are all about indicating sex of newborns without having to peek inside their diapers)??

 

If any users are going to leave iOS devices due to its lacking in features appealing to a demographic consisting of beard growing, leather wearing, Marlboro smoking, wife beating and Harley-Davidson driving phone and tablet users (however big that group is), good effing riddance - they can all go bang a woman over the head, drag her by the hair back into their caves from whence they came and use the outdated (after 2 months) Android device they probably stole.

 

I'm looking for some clues in my man bag, it's here somewhere, right next to my iPad mini - the answer just has to be here or in the glovebox of my sweet tricked out powder puff pink convertible Viper.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

...This is the first time I've ever felt negative about an iOS update after its presentation.
 

It's a good thing you didn't wait to adopt this opinion until after you'd actually played with the software.

 

Personally, I can't wait to get my hands on this software so I can test it out, learn the new OS and decide based on actual usage how it works and what it's like. From what I've seen in the keynote and a couple of the WWDC presentations, I think this will be very interesting as an OS.


Edited by williamlondon - 6/16/13 at 6:37pm
post #57 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I will never understand why people thought this was important enough to "plead" about or are particularly pleased now that it's happened.  

In the first place, you have to open the phone and thus go right by a much larger, clearer, easier to read representation of the time to even see this clock icon.  Also the "clock's" main utility is actually as a timer, not as a time piece.  it takes far too many swipes and taps to get the clock to show you the time for it to be even passing useful as such.  

Finally, as well as being incredibly tiny and hard to see, it's a f*cking analogue clock.  It takes extra time to look at the dial and interpret from the position of the hands what the heck the time even is, whereas a proper digital clock (like the one on the lock screen of the f*cking phone), simply tells you right out.  

It's a practically useless feature that mainly harkens back to the old-timey days of clocks on the wall.  It was rightly added as an afterthought, not as a "pleaded for" improvement.  It has zero practical value and is really in the same category as things like the shredder animation in Passbook (it's almost the definition of skeuomorphic), which everyone is currently celebrating the demise of.  

I'm in full agreement. The only other one, aside from the date, that would have been useful at all is the weather icon (showing the temperature and weather status), yet they didn't do that.

Why don't they work on adding some user customization to the keyboard dictionary or enhance the keyboard behavior or, better yet, fix the weird behaviors inherent in text editing (if I touch at the end of a line, the insertion point should not wrap around to the left side of the screen on the line below! That's keyboard behavior!). And fix text selection scrolling of text views! And make developers be required to use native control behaviors!

Where are THESE enhancements? The actual practical usability?
post #58 of 76
I don't think it's possible to make any comment on the design without experiencing it in action on a retina display. If when used the function is natural and intuitive, then I think the function will win over any design elements that I may not find appealing. You can't please everyone, but continuity and fluidity will always be appreciated.
Edited by connector - 6/16/13 at 6:35pm
post #59 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Frankly, it seems cluttered, vague, and hard to look at/read. Too much brightness/white space, not enough object distinction, too flat, fonts are too thin, and it's going to CRAWL on an iPhone 4. I can't afford a new phone just to update the OS. This is how they do their planned obsolescence. Free OS updates encourage people to slow down their devices so they feel inclined toward buying an upgraded device.

I'm not looking forward to this at all. There wasn't a single practical feature that jumped out at me, but there's lots of eye candy and change for the sake of change. I don't see anything that actually helps the users in here. It reminds me of Android and WinRT, not iPhone. iPhone has all this iconic real estate taken in pop culture and they're going to obsolete it all with this update. That will reduce the iconic nature of the product.

This is the first time I've ever felt negative about an iOS update after its presentation.
Then don't update. Pretty simple solution.
post #60 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamlondon View Post

Perhaps they need to sell iOS devices alongside weapons, farm equipment, military apparel and guns, or the lock screen should profile one of those baby eating dogs with a studded leather collar with a human bone in its mouth; why not just be more blatant and have the lock screen display a vagina (or would that seem as the opposite, too feminine, in which case a penis would be perceived as being more masculine on a lock screen?? but that wouldn't work for obvious reasons either).

Do you mean colours, or is there something more generally feminine about this new *software*, *Software*, *SOFTWARE*?! When did software (except that which is dedicated to the search for sanitary napkins, birth control pills and bras) become so prone to gender and/or sexual identity?

Is it colours (as I've seen so many neanderthals mention in the past week)? Didn't we all leave behind us along with our baby booties (which are all about indicating sex of newborns without having to peek inside their diapers)??

If any users are going to leave iOS devices due to its lacking in features appealing to a demographic consisting of beard growing, leather wearing, Marlboro smoking, wife beating and Harley-Davidson driving phone and tablet users (however big that group is), good effing riddance - they can all go bang a woman over the head, drag her by the hair back into their caves from whence they came and use the outdated (after 2 months) Android device they probably stole.

I'm looking for some clues in my man bag, it's here somewhere, right next to my iPad mini - the answer just has to be here or in the glovebox of my sweet tricked out powder puff pink convertible Viper.
Thank you for such a long reply. It really gave me a sense of your actual perception of what the role of testosterone is in the human body. Even women have a certain amount of it. Was I referring to the color pallet? Sure, that's a factor. I was also referring to the cartoonish (and feminine, in my opinion) icons. Having a rainbow flower as an icon for my photos app seems pretty girly and has a similar effect that bubbly (think high school girl) penmanship would have in a business/executive setting. There was a lot I didn't like about forestalls skeuomorphic design throughout previous versions of IOS but it had a certain class to it. Maybe you need to read up on the roles of hormones before you mouth off. When I said "inject some testosterone" it was my way of avoiding having to write a huge comment like this. However, the sexist individuals like yourself apparently need more of an explanation.
post #61 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by james0378 View Post


Thank you for such a long reply. It really gave me a sense of your actual perception of what the role of testosterone is in the human body. Even women have a certain amount of it. Was I referring to the color pallet? Sure, that's a factor. I was also referring to the cartoonish (and feminine, in my opinion) icons. Having a rainbow flower as an icon for my photos app seems pretty girly and has a similar effect that bubbly (think high school girl) penmanship would have in a business/executive setting. There was a lot I didn't like about forestalls skeuomorphic design throughout previous versions of IOS but it had a certain class to it. Maybe you need to read up on the roles of hormones before you mouth off. When I said "inject some testosterone" it was my way of avoiding having to write a huge comment like this. However, the sexist individuals like yourself apparently need more of an explanation.

 

Thanks for that erudite explanation in how best to turn someone's sexist attitude into someone else's problem, and even better demonstrated is how magically an offender can suddenly be turned into a victim simply through faulty perceptions of his own.

 

I think the whole discussion about feminine vs. masculine elements in a UI is a bunch of crap. I think further that trying to tie those elements to hormones is even stinkier doggie doo. You brought up the masculine issue, I simply think that gender or sex based bias in a UI is merely in the eyes of the beholder, and further, as I've said, I think it's all a bunch of el toro poo poo.

 

Claiming feminine bias (in a UI) is what some might claim is done mostly or only by men trying to hold on to their remaining masculinity for being tainted by something they alone perceive as being "girly" because they (horror of horrors!!) touched a device with a UI sporting bubbles or displaying a colour in an app icon that isn't army fatigues green. How silly.

 

Look hard enough and even the paranoid can imagine losing one's sex-based or gender identity in the easiest ways possible, around every corner, even behind every lock screen on every phone.

 

Personally, I prefer a less serious take on things.


Edited by williamlondon - 6/16/13 at 7:29pm
post #62 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

You realise how completely ridiculous it is to say it's Apple's fault the battery life "sucks" while at the same time identifying a third party app as the source of your battery life problem?  

You realize how stupid your comment is when the only thing that changed was the OS?

 

It worked fine in iOS 6.  It kills batteries in iOS 7.  Is that really a difficult concept for you?

post #63 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


Good grief it's beta 1 software that should only be used by developers right now. People complained that iOS needed better multitasking or "real multitasking" and now that we're getting it people are whining about battery life. Does anyone not think battery life is a primary concern for Apple? That's probably the biggest reason iOS doesn't have widgets on the home screen. I doubt Apple implemented better multitasking without considering battery life implications. You can't use beta software as a gauge for what battery life will be once the product ships.

 

Was there something in what I said where I indicated I wasn't aware that it was beta?  Is the fanboys syndrome so strong that I cannot state that the current battery life sucks?  Simply making a statement is now an attack against you or Apple?

 

I could have sworn we were discussing our experiences with beta1.  Thank god I didn't even mention the bugs I've found, my god, I had better put on my asbestos suit...

post #64 of 76
As someone who doesn't have access to the beta. Thanks for the GIF's - it's really insightful to see these animations. Presumably they've been slowed down here. Hopefully the final implementation will be as crisp as iOS 6. I could see it being really annoying otherwise.
 
The paralax effect looks really nice. The way application icons and font "pop" from the background could make "busier" wallpaper like a family photo more of a viable option. Easily one of my favourite visual changes. Safari tabs being the other.
 
I'm concerned about the impact enhanced multitasking will have on battery life though. I don't want an app that polls location data updating in the background and sapping battery or mobile data though.
 
At first I thought the new icons were lackluster, but since then I have warmed to them. On the spectrum of gaudy to austere Jony has found a comfortable middle ground. The designeratti do need to stop obessing about them not looking similar enough. Ultimately they are going to have to coexist with 3rd party application icons which, other than shape, are not going to conform to any unified design language. The settings icon is just super wrong though. It looks like a clock mechanism or an oven gas ring. Reminders also looks too much like a notes app. Safari as a compass is kind of stupid given that there is also a real compass. If ever there was an appropriate time to change safari's logo now would be it.
 
It is quite incredible what they have achieved in such a short space of time. The last minute changes to the icons in the marketing material make it quite clear that this is very much a work in progress.
post #65 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

The lock screen is a bit of a mess, with arrows on the top and bottom of the screen only serving to confuse and complicate the elegant iOS lock screen, with no arrow where it matters: pointing the unlock direction.

 

I disagree. Multitouch gestures are commonplace now. I think anyone familiar with the iPhone lock screen will already know to swipe to the right to unlock it, and newcomers should find the scrolling highlight in the "swipe to unlock" text intuitive enough to unlock the phone with ease. I also think the top and bottom chevrons are equally intuitive. If anyone is confounded by them, they should understand how they work after the first usage. Overall, I think the changes thus far are brilliant and beautiful. Can't wait until iOS 7's released in the Fall!

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply

"Be aware of wonder." ~ Robert Fulghum

Reply
post #66 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

It's a practically useless feature that mainly harkens back to the old-timey days of clocks on the wall.  It was rightly added as an afterthought, not as a "pleaded for" improvement.  It has zero practical value and is really in the same category as things like the shredder animation in Passbook (it's almost the definition of skeuomorphic), which everyone is currently celebrating the demise of.  

I think the issue concerns showing app data or what could be perceived as app data on an icon. If it's going to look like app data, it should be real data. It shouldn't be like the icon for iCal in OS X was for the longest time. Or like the Weather icon has been in iOS with the constant display of 73 degrees. Or perpetually stuck showing a time of 10:15.
post #67 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

The parallaxing feature where you tilt your home screen to see "behind the icons" is so odd a UI idea from Apple that I'm left a sort of bewildered. It serves as nothing but a distraction from an otherwise elegantly simple home screen interface.

 

I disagree.

 

Someone said many years back "Using Windows is like being on a business trip. Using Macintosh is like going on holiday." Part of the reason for that is that Apple put small flourishes into the OS all over the place that make you smile. Usually they have a functional side but occasionally they don't. This to me does emphasise the ideas of 'layers' that Jony Ive wants to communicate with iOS 7 but it's also a bit of playfulness too.

 

If we end up only with purely functional interfaces to iOS and OS X I think it would be rather a shame. That look of surprise and a smile on your face is surely worth working for?


Edited by KiltedGreen - 6/17/13 at 2:11am
post #68 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post


The icons can be adjusted to size

Could you explain this? Is this a user feature or a developer feature?
post #69 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamlondon View Post

 

Perhaps they need to sell iOS devices alongside weapons, farm equipment, military apparel and guns, or the lock screen should profile one of those baby eating dogs with a studded leather collar with a human bone in its mouth; why not just be more blatant and have the lock screen display a vagina (or would that seem as the opposite, too feminine, in which case a penis would be perceived as being more masculine on a lock screen?? but that wouldn't work for obvious reasons either).

 

Do you mean colours, or is there something more generally feminine about this new *software*, *Software*, *SOFTWARE*?! When did software (except that which is dedicated to the search for sanitary napkins, birth control pills and bras) become so prone to gender and/or sexual identity?

 

Is it colours (as I've seen so many neanderthals mention in the past week)? Didn't we all leave behind us along with our baby booties (which are all about indicating sex of newborns without having to peek inside their diapers)??

 

If any users are going to leave iOS devices due to its lacking in features appealing to a demographic consisting of beard growing, leather wearing, Marlboro smoking, wife beating and Harley-Davidson driving phone and tablet users (however big that group is), good effing riddance - they can all go bang a woman over the head, drag her by the hair back into their caves from whence they came and use the outdated (after 2 months) Android device they probably stole.

 

I'm looking for some clues in my man bag, it's here somewhere, right next to my iPad mini - the answer just has to be here or in the glovebox of my sweet tricked out powder puff pink convertible Viper.

 

 

It's a good thing you didn't wait to adopt this opinion until after you'd actually played with the software.

 

Personally, I can't wait to get my hands on this software so I can test it out, learn the new OS and decide based on actual usage how it works and what it's like. From what I've seen in the keynote and a couple of the WWDC presentations, I think this will be very interesting as an OS.

 

+10! :)

 

An inspired response to such a ridiculous comment by james0378. I think that he and John Dvorak would get on very well together as you can see here and here:

 

 

 

Quote:
But the testosterone issue was lost already. The previous paradigm of computing - command-based, batch-processed, barely coherent - was deeply associated in the MIS community with masculinity. One's virility was associated with the gunmetal boxes and dense, nonintuitive interfaces of those dense beasts. If you weren't familiar with ">A prompts," if you didn't know what CONFIG.SYS meant, you had no hair on your chest. (Even women, when it came to computing, had to have hair on their chests, at least virtually.) And what kind of person used the mouse? A wimp, obviously. Some New Age softie who babbled about using the right side of his or her brain. Columnist John Dvorak contrasted the Mac with the new version of IBM's computer, the AT, and called the latter "a man's computer designed by men for men."

 

There's also an excellent article here on the waste of female talent, objectification of women and the idiocy of the whole man/macho/computer thing. It would be worth reading and digesting for quite a few posters on these forums.

 

I really hope that james0378 doesn't use one of those 'girly' Macintoshes. What would his friends think?

post #70 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65C816 View Post

Was there something in what I said where I indicated I wasn't aware that it was beta?  Is the fanboys syndrome so strong that I cannot state that the current battery life sucks?  Simply making a statement is now an attack against you or Apple?

I could have sworn we were discussing our experiences with beta1.  Thank god I didn't even mention the bugs I've found, my god, I had better put on my asbestos suit...
I'm not surprised battery life might suck in version 1 beta software. Especially when the software includes a lot or debugging code that won't be there when iOS 7 ships. Does anyone really believe Apple will ship iOS 7 full of bugs and sucky battery life?
post #71 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by KiltedGreen View Post

+10! :)

 

An inspired response to such a ridiculous comment. I think that he and John Dvorak would get on very well together as you can see here and here:

 

There's also an excellent article here on the waste of female talent, objectification of women and the idiocy of the whole man/macho/computer thing. It would be worth reading and digesting for quite a few posters on these forums.

 

Those are very interesting articles, thanks for the links - those should be required reading in every Computer Science 101 course in every university the world over. The whole absurdity of it.

 

The other place this issue rears its ugly head has to do with tech specs in computing devices, where the discussion devolves into one about chip numbers and RAM and other component details - it's akin to a bunch of men standing around a neighbour's new car staring at the engine with the hood up poking and prodding various parts, mostly decrying and criticising (because it's more manly to be negative), but these conversations never talk about the user experience, speed of app loading, app switching, smoothness of rendering graphics, undetectable refreshes, usage based requirements, etc. It's always more of anything and higher numbers is good and is required to be considered a worthy device (of which there are very few in the world), and less or fewer of anything, regardless whether those items are needed or taken advantage of in the device, is bad, bad, bad and the person who buys one with less or fewer of anything is stupid and doesn't know the difference between a bit and a nibble, and obviously has too much estrogen flowing through the veins (or simply is a girl). If you happen to disagree with them, step back, because the grease monkeys standing around will all spit tobacco on your feet and laugh and fart and burp as they declare their superiority in their masculinity, while jumping up and down and scratching their arm pits like the apes they are. lol.gif

 

The whole men deriving and bolstering their manhood and masculinity from products reminds me of a great skit in Little Britain USA here.

post #72 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamlondon View Post

 

By Royal Decree I declare the worst icon to be the Safari icon (not just on iOS, but across all platforms, I dislike the compass metaphor). Now let's duel. ;-)

 

I just find is odd that the Safari icon looks more like a compass at a glance, when viewed from a couple of feet away etc, than the actual compass app.  Every other app is (or is intended to be) indicative of it's use in some way, mail looks like mail, clock looks like a clock, compass look like a compass, camera looks like, well, clipart actually, but still, it looks like something you take pictures with.  Safari is not following this way of thinking, and the compass is more indicative of branding, or a logo, than it's intended use.  I think they could perhaps think about retaining the Atlas bit from the old logo and dropping the compass, in order to try to bring some meaning to it.

 

But hey, BETA. B E T A.  And even if they don't change now, they will change in subsequent releases, the phone icon has changed just about every release.  Relax!

post #73 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamlondon View Post

The whole men deriving and bolstering their manhood and masculinity from products reminds me of a great skit in Little Britain USA here.

 

Excellent. And not forgetting this classic from Not The 9 O'Clock News on the BBC years back.

 

OK. That's enough of that for now from me. Back to your usual viewing. 1smile.gif

post #74 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

I thought the Slide To Unlock bar was a fail safe of sorts.

In other words, you had to put your finger on that tab to unlock the phone, and prevent accidental activation. Such as, putting the phone in a pocket, and accidentally pressing the power button, or home button, activating the screen. Now that the entire screen is one big slide to unlock button, it strikes me that accidental activations are much more likely than they are currently. And once the screen is active and the phone unlocked that increases accidental interactions with apps.

It does not have the inertia (objects tend to stay in motion) like the typical swipe operation that continues the page motion after you withdraw your finger. You do have to fully slide the screen from left to right. In fact, slide left to right and back again slowly without completing the operation, you can see the background wall paper slowly go out of focus and then back into focus. I found it quite elegant.
Edited by ChristophB - 6/17/13 at 6:49am
post #75 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I'm not surprised battery life might suck in version 1 beta software. Especially when the software includes a lot or debugging code that won't be there when iOS 7 ships. Does anyone really believe Apple will ship iOS 7 full of bugs and sucky battery life?

^

Between app crashes stranding who-knows-what, the gps location staying active when not needed (i.e. all apps are shutdown), what you've stated above and lots more, it's no wonder that battery life is suffering. It's been that way since dev beta have been released. I've had battery life get drastically worse in later betas as well.
post #76 of 76
My big complaint with all these icons is this. Why can't I build my own home screen with those icons that I use the most? This would be an uncluttered home screen the rest are in the background. Next why can't these icons be active say my photo icon shows the last photo I looked at, the Safari Icon shows the last search I did. Etc. Then why can I not change the size of these icons. You get the point.
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