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Steve Jobs discusses his legacy in rare 1994 video interview

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
A reportedly never-before-seen video from 1994 surfaced on the Web on Tuesday, showing late Apple cofounder Steve Jobs discussing his legacy and what it means to contribute to the industry he helped shape.

The interview, which comes from the Silicon Valley Historical Association, was first spotted by The Loop after YouTube channel EverySteveJobsVideo uploaded the video on Tuesday.



As seen above, Jobs realized even in 1994 that his actions and innovations were fleeting at best in the fast moving field technology.

Jobs likened his contribution as a layer of sediment in a growing mountain. From someone standing on the surface, it's impossible to see and appreciate every individual layer, except for "that rare geologist." It seems that Jobs viewed his legacy as part of a larger collective building toward a higher goal, not a single product or innovation.
post #2 of 38
Little did he know....
post #3 of 38
If you take him at his word, and I do, Jobs really wasn't interested in the business as a way to become fabulously wealthy. He really did want to make the world better through technology. This video clip just reinforces what he said many times over the years. Build great products that improve people's lives.
post #4 of 38
I think Steve was rather insightful to be able to see things this way. And although I believe what he said generally holds true, I think he's a special case, and he's an icon that more than just geologists will remember.
post #5 of 38
If Star Trek is any indication, I have a feeling touchscreens will be with us for a long time.
post #6 of 38
"I think he's a special case, and he's an icon that more than just geologists will remember."

I think you could possibly say that he's an icon that 'even' geologists will remember.
post #7 of 38

And those who are standing higher will look down at the previous layers of sediment and say:

 

"It was natural evolution. Stop being a bully in court.".

 

1smoking.gif

post #8 of 38
Steve who?



warning: this post contains troll bait
post #9 of 38

Note that he said the Macintosh would be "obsolete in a few years", almost 20 years ago. I think that was coming from an axe he was still grinding, prior to his historic return to Apple. 1wink.gif

post #10 of 38
Not never before seen footage. Just not seen by the masses because most people wrote NeXT and Steve off by 1994.
post #11 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapf Brannigan View Post

Note that he said the Macintosh would be "obsolete in a few years", almost 20 years ago. I think that was coming from an axe he was still grinding, prior to his historic return to Apple. 1wink.gif

 

True, but the Mac and next generation devices like the iPhone/iPad are running NeXTSTEP, not MacOS. The Mac of 1994 is long dead. :)

post #12 of 38
Intelligence in people is dime-a-dozen. What this man had -- in spades, and will not be easily replicated -- is intuition and insight.

It'll be a long time coming, before we something like this again in tech. We'll know it when we see it.
post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrstep View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapf Brannigan View Post

Note that he said the Macintosh would be "obsolete in a few years", almost 20 years ago. I think that was coming from an axe he was still grinding, prior to his historic return to Apple. 1wink.gif

True, but the Mac and next generation devices like the iPhone/iPad are running NeXTSTEP, not MacOS. The Mac of 1994 is long dead. 1smile.gif

These types of fools are not even worthy of a response, let alone a serious response. ;-)
post #14 of 38
I don't agree with Steve, which is rare. Anyone that receives a decent education will learn that much of the computer equipment they are using was possible because of Steve Jobs, just as the electricity they are using was possible because of Thomas Edison and the vehicle they drive everyday was because of Henry Ford.
post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

I don't agree with Steve, which is rare. Anyone that receives a decent education will learn that much of the computer equipment they are using was possible because of Steve Jobs, just as the electricity they are using was possible because of Thomas Edison and the vehicle they drive everyday was because of Henry Ford.

 

You're not looking at the big picture.  Henry Ford was just the blink of an eye ago, (and he had little to do with the invention of the automobile actually).  Edison was only a few years further back (and he stole every invention he ever came up with actually).  

 

Already no one really remembers the pioneers of the computer age, and few outside of the tech community could tell you anything about how the first computers were made.  In 50 years (another blink of an eye), no one will remember Steve Jobs or what we do remember about him will be so distorted that it might as well be fantasy. Certainly, no one will remember or care about any of this a hundred or two hundred years from now.  

 

Why would someone in the 23rd century give even a moments thought to the first Apple computer?  

post #16 of 38
>Why would someone in the 23rd century give even a moments thought to the first Apple computer?

Why would anyone in the 21st century give even a moment's thought to Gutenberg's first printing press?

(And yes, the personal computer and the GUI are as big a deals as the printing press. Of course, the problem is that most people connect Jobs with his second stint at Apple, when his first was of greater historical significance).
Edited by webwielder - 6/18/13 at 9:03pm
post #17 of 38

Because history is rarely taught anymore. Kids today don't even know that a potato is a vegetable, not a french fry.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

You're not looking at the big picture.  Henry Ford was just the blink of an eye ago, (and he had little to do with the invention of the automobile actually).  Edison was only a few years further back (and he stole every invention he ever came up with actually).  

 

Already no one really remembers the pioneers of the computer age, and few outside of the tech community could tell you anything about how the first computers were made.  In 50 years (another blink of an eye), no one will remember Steve Jobs or what we do remember about him will be so distorted that it might as well be fantasy. Certainly, no one will remember or care about any of this a hundred or two hundred years from now.  

 

Why would someone in the 23rd century give even a moments thought to the first Apple computer?  

post #18 of 38
Sad but mostly true. Mac would have been obsolete had he not returned to Apple. Most people using computers far in the future will have no idea about the people and hardware/software of the past that made it happen.

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post #19 of 38

Man oh man, I really miss him.

 

Having said this, the last WWDC was really well done. Loads better than anything Google, MS, Blackberry, Sony ever put on! :)

post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Why would someone in the 23rd century give even a moments thought to the first Apple computer?  

 

Assuming there are still humans in the 23rd century and that technological evolution remains linear then future computer scientists, at least, will be taught about the accomplishments of Steve Wozniak and Douglas Engelbart. They pretty much invented the personal computer and the GUI. As for Steve, I'm sure he'll get a paragraph there somewhere for his vision and drive for innovation in the consumer segment. I don't expect any of the M$ or Google guys to be remembered at all as their contributions so far have been close to nil. 1wink.gif

post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by architecton View Post

Assuming there are still humans in the 23rd century and that technological evolution remains linear then future computer scientists, at least, will be taught about the accomplishments of Steve Wozniak and Douglas Engelbart. They pretty much invented the personal computer and the GUI. As for Steve, I'm sure he'll get a paragraph there somewhere for his vision and drive for innovation in the consumer segment. I don't expect any of the M$ or Google guys to be remembered at all as their contributions so far have been close to nil. 1wink.gif

I guess I'll have to add a little to this. Steve Jobs developed the personal computer for the masses, and it turns out, the company to make it happen on a massive scale. He's comparable to Ford, or Porsche with the Volkswagen, in taking a nascent chaotic technology to the next level of mass production, while humanizing it for the masses at the same time.

Ford, Porsche and Jobs were as crucial to the success of their industries as the inventors whose ideas they used to build their companies' products. Steve Jobs will get much more than a paragraph, I think.
post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

And those who are standing higher will look down at the previous layers of sediment and say:

 

"It was natural evolution. Stop being a bully in court.".

 

1smoking.gif

 

 

That is nonsense.

If Apple takes to court, which is impartial btw, a small company that steals its IP, it will be the case.

 

Samsung and others Android/Windows Cartel members are NOT small players.

post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post

That is nonsense.

If Apple takes to court, which is impartial btw, a small company that steals its IP, it will be the case.

 

Samsung and others Android/Windows Cartel members are NOT small players.

 

I like the cut of your jib.

 

1wink.gif

post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

I like the cut of your jib.

 

1wink.gif

 

 

Yeah, like deep pocket corporations battle in court makes you sour.

post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by architecton View Post

 

Assuming there are still humans in the 23rd century and that technological evolution remains linear then future computer scientists, at least, will be taught about the accomplishments of Steve Wozniak and Douglas Engelbart. They pretty much invented the personal computer and the GUI. As for Steve, I'm sure he'll get a paragraph there somewhere for his vision and drive for innovation in the consumer segment. I don't expect any of the M$ or Google guys to be remembered at all as their contributions so far have been close to nil. 1wink.gif

 

This is a typical response from someone who looks at the world thru the tinted lens of tech. The study of Steve Jobs and Apple will probably be a required course in every business school in the world. Jobs' philosophy of design, the merging of technology and liberal arts will be taught in social studies classes. People like yourself don't "get" Steve Jobs. Actually, you are incapable of getting Steve Jobs because you can't see the other side of technology. You are completely blind to it.

post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post


Yeah, like deep pocket corporations battle in court makes you sour.

Are you familiar with the expression "I like the cut of your jib"?

You can look it up, if you wish. I'll stand over here next to this elephant and wait while you do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

This is a typical response from someone who looks at the world thru the tinted lens of tech. The study of Steve Jobs and Apple will probably be a required course in every business school in the world. Jobs' philosophy of design, the merging of technology and liberal arts will be taught in social studies classes. People like yourself don't "get" Steve Jobs. Actually, you are incapable of getting Steve Jobs because you can't see the other side of technology. You are completely blind to it.

Great minds think alike, ikrupp, and I like the way you think.
post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post


Are you familiar with the expression "I like the cut of your jib"?

You can look it up, if you wish. I'll stand over here next to this elephant and wait while you do.
Great minds think alike, ikrupp, and I like the way you think.

 

Oh, i know irony, i think.

Should i write thought?

post #28 of 38
Your irony skills are excellent!

However, you may have to work on your sarcasm detection skills: I utterly agree with you.

My original statement was sarcastic.

1wink.gif
post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


These types of fools are not even worthy of a response, let alone a serious response. ;-)

Agreed. :) 

post #30 of 38

What Steve did is a bit more profound than "oh hey, look at this whiz bang computer"  If that was all he had accomplished then he would be written off in 10 years just as he said he would be.  And he will likely not be remembered for his tech or even lifestyle contributions for very long.

 

What he will be remembered for is what he did in business.  Turning around a company from near death to the worlds most valuable company in its industry is something that is likely to be studied, dissected and taught in business schools all over the world as new generations of entrepreneurs seek to recreate that success.  That is much more than a blip in history or a paragraph in an industry.

 

But, anyone commenting today on how Steve will be remembered (including this post) is talking gibberish because only time will truly tell.
 

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Because history is rarely taught anymore. Kids today don't even know that a potato is a vegetable, not a french fry.

Potato is a tuber.

 

Edit: I just read up on it and it can be considered a vegetable as well since the word vegetable is a very loosely defined term that includes virtually all consumable parts of a plant. Fruits are not consider to be vegetables.


Edited by mstone - 6/19/13 at 8:18am

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post #32 of 38
"I don't agree with Steve, which is rare. Anyone that receives a decent education will learn that much of the computer equipment they are using was possible because of Steve Jobs, just as the electricity they are using was possible because of Thomas Edison and the vehicle they drive everyday was because of Henry Ford."

I think the above proves Steve's point. Edison did not give us the electricity we use today. He did everything he could to stop it. He pushed DC distribution. If you want to credit someone for today's electricity let's go with Tesla and Westinghouse. As for Ford, his contribution was the assembly line, not anything special about the automobile per se. So we owe to Ford almost anything mass produced on an assembly line. All these inventors did not exist in isolation, they developed on top of previous researches and inventions.. Yes, Westinghouse left Tesla a virtual pauper by not paying the royalities on the AC generator that Tesla invented but Tesla allowed that to happen because of his vision of an electricity and its uses.

Steve's place in history? Well let's let the future decide. I certainly think he will be remembered, I just don't know exactly what that will be.
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick View Post

I just don't know exactly what that will be.

At least it won't be what you're thinking. Pretending Steve didn't have direct personal influence on how the fledgling technology was founded is kidding yourself.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

I don't agree with Steve, which is rare. Anyone that receives a decent education will learn that much of the computer equipment they are using was possible because of Steve Jobs, just as the electricity they are using was possible because of Thomas Edison and the vehicle they drive everyday was because of Henry Ford.

No no no, on the part of Henry Ford and Steve Jobs. There were thousands of people involved on cars & technology, don't know about electricity ...
post #35 of 38
They can study Jobs as long as they want, the ppl who get it will never be put in his position and the people who will be put in his position will never get it.
The very process of making a career, going to business school, etc. is the antithesis of the process that produces the kind of thinking he displayed in action.
Corporations make safe choices, they want degrees, certificates, consensus, focus groups, market studies, bean counting.
They are penny wise and pound foolish when it comes to product design and rather try to win in court, by lobbying, through industry alliances, etc.
The old G.B.Shaw quote comes to mind:
"The reasonable man adjusts himself to the world, the unreasonable man tries to adjust the world to himself; therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
Jobs like many children was "unreasonable", professional business people pride themselves being the most reasonable of men. Need one say more?
post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

I don't agree with Steve, which is rare. Anyone that receives a decent education will learn that much of the computer equipment they are using was possible because of Steve Jobs, just as the electricity they are using was possible because of Thomas Edison and the vehicle they drive everyday was because of Henry Ford.

 

Anyone with a decent education knows that when the time is right, advances will take place (barring any religious or other dampening interference).

 

Assembly lines were coming with or without Ford.  Electric light even if Edison had never lived.  Steamships without Fulton.  Flight without the Wright brothers, absolutely.  Automobiles, trains, computers, GUIs... all these things would appear no matter what, because the technology and markets were ripe for them.

 

What history shows is that one or two people always become famous for marketing the advances before anyone else, and get credit for the details actually done by their employees. 

 

It's just a lot easier to teach kids about a few famous people.  

post #37 of 38
In the year 2030, every child will be made to watch a copy of Steve's 2007 iphone keynote. He shall be known as the father of the modern smartphone. 1wink.gif
post #38 of 38
not really new, he stated this very opinion later in 1997 in TIME's article after he returned to Apple:

"Musing on the differences between the computer biz and the animation biz, Jobs notes, "Look, you work on a technical product, and if you're really lucky, it ships. If you're really, really lucky, it's a hit and lasts a year. If you're in the pantheon of products it lasts a decade, then it rapidly becomes a sediment layer on which the next layer of technology is built. I don't think you'll be able to boot up any computer today in 20 years."

But in 1994 he was being really humble about himself... I miss him not being around anymore :/
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