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Apple wins $30 million iPad contract from LA school district [u] - Page 2

post #41 of 71
I thought with parallax and UIDynamics iOS 7 would be more animated and 3D than any other version of iOS? Also, how so we know page turning animation was turned off in iOS 7? And even if it was, how may kids would notice? I highly doubt they'll care that the bookshelf is no longer faux wood grain.
post #42 of 71

678$, isnt it a bit expensive? 

post #43 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazolight View Post

678$, isnt it a bit expensive? 

 

We don't know exactly which model they are talking about, maybe it's 32GB or 64GB and it does say that they come preloaded with a bunch of educational software on them. And maybe there are also some accessories included. And what about Applecare? That's probably included too.


Edited by Apple ][ - 6/19/13 at 11:07am
post #44 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I thought with parallax and UIDynamics iOS 7 would be more animated and 3D than any other version of iOS? Also, how so we know page turning animation was turned off in iOS 7? And even if it was, how may kids would notice? I highly doubt they'll care that the bookshelf is no longer faux wood grain.

 

I don't know about you, but I absolutely love the Books app and the wood. How does it hurt? It gives context, solidity, and a better feeling that you actually own those things. Why would a white background be any better? I hope they don't replace it with the trash interface thats the new Newsstand. 

post #45 of 71

And this deal was approved by a 6-0 vote! There were obviously no Fandroids sitting on that school board! Good for them!

post #46 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazolight View Post

678$, isnt it a bit expensive? 


This is the problem with freetard remarks like these.  Do you think one can unwrap a new iPad and just give it to a student for automatic use in school?  There's software and services that need to be included and that has a cost.  It also includes maintenance and accident protection too.  Jeez... this gets old when people have zero clue.

post #47 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgirlfeelsold View Post

Can you elaborate on the sustainable part? Because buying devices that obsolesce every five years or so seems unsustainable.

Look at how long paper textbooks last.

 

Digital publication is far superior. And given the cost per textbook, cheaper as well.


Edited by jfc1138 - 6/19/13 at 11:32am
post #48 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

30 million is pocket change to Apple, it's like you finding a buck in the street.

And then :via Wiki: During the 2011-2012 school year, LAUSD served 662,140 students times $678..... starts to be very real money. Not to mention early exposure has a large influence on future purchasing choices....


Edited by jfc1138 - 6/19/13 at 11:33am
post #49 of 71

Not sure why the article states that Apple was also the cheapest.  I find that hard to believe. 

 

Also - anyone heard what is going on with Turkey making their decision to buy ipads?

post #50 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Applehawk View Post

Also - anyone heard what is going on with Turkey making their decision to buy ipads?

 

Hopefully it's dead, because they had demanded that the devices be built in that country. Screw that and screw them. And besides, they probably have a few other problems to worry about now, with all of the protests going on.

post #51 of 71
Quote:
The Redmond, Wash., software company argued that most businesses use Microsoft platforms, and Windows tablets would be a good way to expose students to those devices.

It's about time we put that tired argument to bed.

post #52 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by chabig View Post

It's about time we put that tired argument to bed.

No, they're 100% correct. Except "expose" in this sense is more like...

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #53 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

And this deal was approved by a 6-0 vote! There were obviously no Fandroids sitting on that school board! Good for them!

 

Many years ago my local school district decided to "go Windows." I remember the public meeting where some poser techie dads were yammering on about how their children needed to use "real" computers instead of Macs. I can see those same types being apoplectic that LA didn't choose a "real" tablet that runs Office.

post #54 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

30 million is pocket change to Apple, it's like you finding a buck in the street.

"The $30 million commitment for iPads is the first phase of a larger roll out for the country’s second-largest public school district." (from Apple's press release).

 

It's going to end up being worth a lot more than $30 million.

post #55 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


This is the problem with freetard remarks like these.  Do you think one can unwrap a new iPad and just give it to a student for automatic use in school?  There's software and services that need to be included and that has a cost.  It also includes maintenance and accident protection too.  Jeez... this gets old when people have zero clue.

 

Sorry to hear your dog just died being hit by a car, your wife cheated on you with the postman and your kid just repudiated you, what a bad day you had. I will understand and forgive you for being a little on the nerves :)

post #56 of 71
> [The LAUSD] has awarded Apple with a $30 million contract to provide iPads to every student it serves.

No, that's not what this is. LAUSD has over 1000 schools. This is just for 47 campuses. This is a pilot program which will give iPads to a few schools.
post #57 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The second-largest school system in the U.S., the L.A. Unified School District, has awarded Apple with a $30 million contract to provide iPads to every student it serves [updated with comment from Apple].

The deal was approved by the district's board in a unanimous vote on Tuesday, according to the Los Angeles Times. The district will pay $678 per device, and the iPads will come preloaded with educational software.

Update: Later Wednesday, Apple issued a press release touting the board's decision to exclusively adopt the iPad for classroom use. The company also noted that the $30 million deal is the first phase of a larger roll-out for the Los Angeles school district.

< snip >
The contract is so significant that Apple's rival Microsoft got involved, asking the district to pilot more than one product and consider its Windows devices. The Redmond, Wash., software company argued that most businesses use Microsoft platforms, and Windows tablets would be a good way to expose students to those devices.

District staff, however, declared Apple's iPad the superior product. They said it wouldn't be fair to require some students to use a different, lesser product than the iPad.

iPad sales to educational institutions have become increasingly common as tablets have grown in popularity. Data from last year demonstrated that Apple's iPad is definitively replacing sales of traditional PCs in education.

iPad adoption isn't limited to grade school either. An initiative at Arkansas State University will require all incoming students to have an iPad as of this fall.

 

The $30 million dollar deal is only Phase I of the contract and only represents about 44,000 iPads. Since the Unified School District has a total of 640,000 students, the total purchase, over time, will be closer to a half a billion dollars. No wonder Uncle Fester was so interested in the contract.

 

This has got to burn Uncle Fester's ass hairs. Microsoft is giving away 10,000 unsaleable SurfaceRTs at a huge school administrator's event this summer, while Apple is SELLING many times that number for a healthy profit. 

 

Besides the LAUSD telling Uncle Fester to "stuff it," they went on to call it a lesser quality tablet. Ouch! Talk about putting the Surface RT in its place!!

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #58 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

But they could have had twice as many surfaces with keyboard covers! 1oyvey.gif

This:
"The Board voted unanimously for Apple because iPad rated the best in quality, was the least expensive option and received the highest scoring by the review panel that included students and teachers," said Jaime Aquino, LAUSD Deputy Superintendent of Instruction.

"Unanimously". Let that sink in, Microsoft.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #59 of 71

«District staff, however, declared Apple's iPad the superior product. They said it wouldn't be fair to require some students to use a different, lesser product than the iPad.»

 

I mean, boy ho boy!

 

I feel for you MS... NOT!! And by the way "unanimous" is quite the rounding error :¬)

 

Ok I’ll stop rubbing it in...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazolight View Post

678$, isnt it a bit expensive? 

 

If you simply look at retail value of the device, yes that seems expensive... But public organization don’t mesure using retail value alone. For example; there is the device’s usable lifespan, failure rates, bundled software, security and maintenance costs, IT staff training and support and so on, and so on... So if the deal covers a period of 3 years and is inclusive of a lot of the costs of the upkeep for said period, it translates to $226 a year per unit (4 years=$170, 5 years=$135).

post #60 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazolight View Post

 

Sorry to hear your dog just died being hit by a car, your wife cheated on you with the postman and your kid just repudiated you, what a bad day you had. I will understand and forgive you for being a little on the nerves :)


Hmm.... talking from personal experience?  Sorry you had it so rough.

Refer to below explanation.  Running a shop, be it a corporation or school, actually costs money above and beyond the purchase of any product.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juil View Post

 

If you simply look at retail value of the device, yes that seems expensive... But public organization don’t mesure using retail value alone. For example; there is the device’s usable lifespan, failure rates, bundled software, security and maintenance costs, IT staff training and support and so on, and so on... So if the deal covers a period of 3 years and is inclusive of a lot of the costs of the upkeep for said period, it translates to $226 a year per unit (4 years=$170, 5 years=$135).

post #61 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazolight View Post

678$, isnt it a bit expensive? 

 

In the public sector, I have come to learn that for many things, you cannot just look at the upfront costs and base your purchasing decisions on them alone. Remember that the pupils are your customers, and everything the educators do, they do it for their pupils. 

 

Say I am putting up a tender for an external vendor to bring my school on an excursion, or conduct an adventure camp. The company putting in the lowest bid may be quoting such a cheap price exactly because they are not as experienced or capable as the rest of the competition. Their staff may not be as knowledgeable or engaging, or able to pitch the lesson in way that maximises the pupils' learning or create a memorable experience. Or they may have a poorer safety record. In short, they are cheap for a reason. 

 

Once, my school needed AA batteries. The staff in charge of procuring them went for some cheap, no-brand battery that was practically useless for the tasks we needed them for (powering digital cameras and stuff). We ended up throwing the entire batch away because they began to leak soon after. 

 

I would say that in scenarios like this, getting ipads should best be seen as a long-term investment. The simplified UI means that pupils likely spend less time and energy grappling with potential problems like inability to log in or connect to the network, leaving more time for lessons. If any issues do crop up, a hard refresh usually solves the problem. Apps allow pupils to focus better on the task at hand (compared to browsers running flash, where pupils can easily open other websites in the background), and App selection for the ipad is unparalled compared to the other platforms. 

 

Granted, their usefulness ultimately depends on how extensively the schools use them, but I would say that it is money well spent. :)

post #62 of 71

Indeed, I underlooked many things. Thank you :)

post #63 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazolight View Post

Indeed, I underlooked many things. Thank you 1smile.gif

The word you may have meant to use is "overlooked."

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #64 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


This is the problem with freetard remarks like these.  Do you think one can unwrap a new iPad and just give it to a student for automatic use in school?  There's software and services that need to be included and that has a cost.  It also includes maintenance and accident protection too.  Jeez... this gets old when people have zero clue.

 

Wow. Harsh. Unnecessary. And you're considered the sharpest one in the room by how many?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazolight View Post

 

Sorry to hear your dog just died being hit by a car, your wife cheated on you with the postman and your kid just repudiated you, what a bad day you had. I will understand and forgive you for being a little on the nerves :)

LOL

post #65 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


The word you may have meant to use is "overlooked."

Or "looked under"?

post #66 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juil View Post

 

If you simply look at retail value of the device, yes that seems expensive... But public organization don’t mesure using retail value alone. For example; there is the device’s usable lifespan, failure rates, bundled software, security and maintenance costs, IT staff training and support and so on, and so on... So if the deal covers a period of 3 years and is inclusive of a lot of the costs of the upkeep for said period, it translates to $226 a year per unit (4 years=$170, 5 years=$135).

Making it up ... a bit?

post #67 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

This's just show how risky iOS 7 is. This deal was made with iOS 6 in mind

Or not.

I suspect it was stability of the hardware, support options if there are hardware failures and the books/apps available for use that decided the issue more so than the UI.

And the final vote was apparently after the keynote so they knew at least in general terms what to expect if they update the iPads or buy them after the next release. Although they are more likely to be buying them now since a track will start in July and another in early September.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #68 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebergh View Post


That certainly doesn't sound like they are buying an iPad for EVERY student if they are only sending them out to 47 sites!
-eb

Likely a pilot run at this point.

And i took another look, no where did anyone say buy. They could have some kind of leasing deal in place which will allow them to justify locking down the iPads as the owners merely loaning them to the kids and be able to refresh them every 2-3 years with whatever is new. They used to do this kind of thing with computers (might still)

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Lucky students!

Imagine if they had iPads back when most of us were kids and still in school!

It sure beats lugging around a huge stack of heavy, used books, with obscene scribbling on most pages.

But I have such fond memories of my seventh grade health book with the cartoon penises on every page of the sexuality chapter

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #70 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

But I have such fond memories of my seventh grade health book with the cartoon penises on every page of the sexuality chapter

That seems endemic across the board, doesn't it? And you'd think with the real thing literally pages away they could draw a more accurate likeness.

Now kids will have to touch-highlight the appropriate text, add a new note, and do something like "8===D" and "( . Y . )" on every page.

Technology. It's ruining the finer* things in life.
*as though it even needs a clarification

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #71 of 71
Another area where working with both Apple and Google might be beneficial. Apple's hardware and Google textbook services

https://play.google.com/store/books/collection/promotion_1000568_txb_product
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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