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Editorial: iOS 7 shows how Apple is leading mobile computing - Page 4

post #121 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Richardson View Post

But is Apple reinvesting its profits? Or just sitting on a lot of cash?

Apple allocated $10B capex on equipment and retail this year, and developed more OS software than Google and Microsoft combined. It's platform is selling all the apps.

Apple doesn't have to blow $8B to $12.5B on dubious acquisitions to keep up with MS&GOOG. it does still have more money than ever though, because it is making money faster than it can spend.

Spending money poorly is not better than sitting on it, even when you have some minor inflation going on.
post #122 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

If iOS 7 is playing catchup what the hell was iOS 6? All the things people are bitching about that iOS 7 doesn't have or doesn't do, they didn't get any of that under Jobs & Forstall.

I base my comments on functionality. Siri & Google Now, those are my main concerns.

iOS 6 was pre-Google Now. I had hoped Apple would answer Google Now by opening Siri to devs. Instead they decided to slap lipstick on the os and call it a day.

Again, I bet iOS 8 will be great, but I have no plans to put iOS 7 on my iPads. I hope it improves by Oct.
post #123 of 299
IMO, Scott simply had to go. Ios6 just plain stank (I feel it was the weakest release in ios history), and he was reportedly a roadblock preventing the other departments from working effectively together.
post #124 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

Take a look at Windows Phone fonts, especially headlines, where the end portion of a words always floats out of the screen. 

 

The moment you actually use a Windows Phone, you realize that the text going off the screen is an elegant and minimalist way of indicating that there is more content in that direction, reachable by scrolling towards it.

 

From its minimalism to its typography to its active tiles, I often think of Windows Phone UI's innovations as being more like what one would've expected from Apple.

 

--

 

As for iOS7, it's basically the same iOS with different colors and a few additions tacked on.  It's not a core redesign like Windows Phone was, coming from Windows Mobile.

 

Of course, one would not expect Apple to make a massive UI change at this point, due to the need for legacy app and customer support.  

 

As the article noted (and I've said many times), taking a big UI leap is a luxury that only a new smartphone entrant (as Apple was when they entered the market), or an old one with falling sales (e.g. Palm, Microsoft, RIM) can afford to take. 


Edited by KDarling - 6/23/13 at 9:53am
post #125 of 299

The iOS 7 interface is great imo, it reminds me of start trek next generation interface, which is neat and optimize for functions over looks.  

 

But Apple is absolutely NOT leading anything with it, its just FOLLOWING the flat interface trend. There is some minor innovations and despite a lot of elements being taking out of various other OS's, the final product is still unique.

 

This OS will be good enough to drive existing and new products for the next few years, but Apple problem doesn't lie on the software side imo, its on the hardware side. I want more choice withing existing products and for the love the god MORE product categories. 

post #126 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

I base my comments on functionality. Siri & Google Now, those are my main concerns.

iOS 6 was pre-Google Now. I had hoped Apple would answer Google Now by opening Siri to devs. Instead they decided to slap lipstick on the os and call it a day.

Again, I bet iOS 8 will be great, but I have no plans to put iOS 7 on my iPads. I hope it improves by Oct.
I'd be curious if developers think iOS 7 is just lipstick on the OS and nothing more. At WWDC Craig Federighi mentioned 1,500 new APIs. Is that just lipstick?
post #127 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

The iOS 7 interface is great imo, it reminds me of start trek next generation interface, which is neat and optimize for functions over looks.  

But Apple is absolutely NOT leading anything with it, its just FOLLOWING the flat interface trend. There is some minor innovations and despite a lot of elements being taking out of various other OS's, the final product is still unique.

This OS will be good enough to drive existing and new products for the next few years, but Apple problem doesn't lie on the software side imo, its on the hardware side. I want more choice withing existing products and for the love the god MORE product categories. 
It's funny you say Apple's problem is hardware as so many say its software and services. If you want Apple to become Samsung (they certainly have plenty of product categories!) I think you'll be waiting a long time. Apple didn't get to where they are by an abundance of product types. I can't see them changing their core philosophy now.
post #128 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

Here's what's going on:  When it comes to highly complex, mass market consumer products, integrated manufacturing and design will eventually beat the non-integrated (or 'diffused' for lack of a better term) model EXCEPT when overwhelming market power is able to blunt the advantages of the integrated approach.

When competition is so intense that manufacturers are forced to eke out the last ounce of performance and efficiency out of their products, they will pour more and more effort into optimizing and fine tuning the product and its components to eliminate every last bit of inefficiency, whether engineering or economic.  An automaker can't do this if it is using an engine that is designed by the engine maker to be sold to several auto companies.  A smartphone company likewise is hampered if its OS is designed to be a one-size-fits-all solution.  Sure, early on, the auto industry, as the outgrowth of the carriage industry, had independent engine, chassis, and coach builders.  But in the beginning, autos were not a mass market and competition wasn't that intense.  Today, all auto companies and their products are highly integrated. The ones outsourcing their engines are low volume specialty shops selling tremendously expensive product.

With a massive marketing and advertising budget, Samsung was able to give the illusion that its product is as good and as refined as the iPhone.  Well, latest news is that Samsung has cut back smartphone component orders significantly and the stock market has responded.  As this relentless drive to optimize, refine, and perfect smartphones continues, the distance between iOS and Android will get wider and wider.  We see it now in the vast difference in energy efficiency.  There is no magic bullet in extending battery up time per charge, it's all hard painstaking work designing all your components including the OS to operate efficiently by itself and in concert.

The exception of course is the Windows PC but that's because Microsoft's monopoly was able to neutralize all competition and so there was no need to put any effort into optimizing, fine tuning and perfecting.  Without any meaningful competition, we thought we should be happy enough just to know that when Windows starts to get bogged down, we can always reboot, and when the arterial clogging becomes unbearable, we reinstall.  What foolish dolts we mortals were.

All of Apple's smartphone competitors know that they have to integrate or die.  But unlike Apple, none of them has the breadth and depth of hardware and software skills and knowhow that are required to run a successful mobile computing company.

Good comparison with the auto industry (surprisingly an industry that compares well with the computer industry on a number of levels). Also a reason why you'll see Samsung start making its own "engine" soon.

Also why Google bought Moto; have to hedge their bets when the inevitable happen. There's no love between OEMs and Google... Android was just a convenient way to stay in the game until they could catch up with Apple, not to mention it's easy to fork ala Amazon.
post #129 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by enature View Post

Very, very insightful! After Job's death only Scott Forstall could stand up to Ive's boundless "essentiality." But Tim Cook fired him. So we will continue to see Sir Ive "
ruthlessly stripping" iOS... Sad. 

Pretty sure it was Jobs who gave Ive more power than anyone not the CEO or named Jobs.

I don't get all this love for Forstall. I guess because a few (even AppleInsider) wanted to anoint him the "next Steve". Look, it didn't happen. It's ok.

For a company as cohesive (on the outside) as Apple, it makes much more sense to have hardware and software working together, which wasn't happening under Scott. I mean, that's what Apple is all about.
post #130 of 299
As a user, I much prefer this minimalist UI.

As a developer, minimalist non-skew apps will be much easier to do. I don't have to be a graphic artist. I don't have to mimic the real world. This will lead to more consistency (= ease of use) in apps. It's a big win.
post #131 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by enature View Post

Daniel Eran Dilger (DED) - a known cheerleader of Cook's misguided leadership - goes overboard in verbosity trying to hide the obvious - Cook's policies led to one of the largest shareholder losses in the history and.... And Cook is not done yet. Soon AAPL price will fall under $400 and will have $3XX prices tag.
 
DED uses every tactic under the sun - from the decade old failings of Wintel to the unquestionably gloried and revolutionary accomplishments of Apple during Job's era - to cover up Cook's recent losses and portray iOS as the best thing in mobile platforms.... Gimme a break!
 
Cook - an undisputed chain-supply guru and a spreadsheet genius - coasted on Job's vision for a year, which got AAPL above $700. Having no guts to make radical changes - like increasing iPhone screen size above 4" or fixing unreliable iCloud - Cook just continues to coast while AAPL tumbles to $600 to $500 to $400 to...  over $250 billion lost and counting.... I guess the next DED piece will be even more prolix and defensive.  

Good to see the anti-Cook brigade back in force.

Also good that Apple's shares never tumbled during Jobs' tenure, or that the market isn't irrational or anything like that.
post #132 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

The moment you actually use a Windows Phone, you realize that the text going off the screen is an elegant and minimalist way of indicating that there is more content in that direction, reachable by scrolling towards it.


From its minimalism to its typography to its active tiles, I often think of Windows Phone UI's innovations as being more like what one would've expected from Apple.


--


As for iOS7, it's basically the same iOS with different colors and a few additions tacked on.  It's not a core redesign like Windows Phone was, coming from Windows Mobile.


Of course, one would not expect Apple to make a massive UI change at this point, due to the need for legacy app and customer support.  

As the article noted (and I've said many times), taking a big UI leap is a luxury that only a new smartphone entrant (as Apple was when they entered the market), or an old one with falling sales (e.g. Palm, Microsoft, RIM) can afford to take. 
Apple isn't making a huge UI change because what they introduced in 2007 still works. No one has demonstrated that the grid of icons no longer works or something else is much better. With Windows 8 and its live tiles how much can you really glean staring at the screen? I look at the screen below and it takes me a while to get oriented to all the different components on screen vying for my attention. It's almost as if Microsoft built it with this enterprise mindset; it reminds me a bit like a corporate dashboard for some operations manager. Also, how much time do people spend staring at their home screen/desktop. iOS has always been a springboard for apps. I think Apple has more work to do in terms of app organization and app curation but I don't see iOS changing its focus away from being a springboard to great apps. I think Apple's priority is ensuring iOS always has the best apps and developers develop for iOS first and are most rewarded developing for iOS platform.

Windows-8-Desktop.jpg
post #133 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

Pretty sure it was Jobs who gave Ive more power than anyone not the CEO or named Jobs.

I don't get all this love for Forstall. I guess because a few (even AppleInsider) wanted to anoint him the "next Steve". Look, it didn't happen. It's ok.

For a company as cohesive (on the outside) as Apple, it makes much more sense to have hardware and software working together, which wasn't happening under Scott. I mean, that's what Apple is all about.

Here's what Steve said about Ive to Walter Isaacson:
Quote:
The difference that Jony has made, not only at Apple but in the world, is huge. He is a wickedly intelligent person in all ways. He understands business concepts, marketing concepts. He picks stuff up just like that, click. He understands what we do at our core better than anyone. If I had a spiritual partner at Apple, it’s Jony. Jony and I think up most of the products together and then pull others in and say, “Hey, what do you think about this?” He gets the big picture as well as the most infinitesimal details about each product. And he understands that Apple is a product company. He’s not just a designer. That’s why he works directly for me. He has more operational power than anyone else at Apple except me. There’s no one who can tell him what to do, or to butt out. That’s the way I set it up.

If some people think Ive has too much power at Apple then Steve is the one they need to blame. Not Tim Cook.
post #134 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

If some people think Ive has too much power at Apple then Steve is the one they need to blame. Not Tim Cook.

Thank you.
post #135 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post


I fully expect the Galaxy S5 to run the "GalaxyOS". Either a forked version of Android or Tizen that is compatible with Android apps but runs its own Samsung Galaxy Store apps too.

 

Maybe, but I don't think it's likely. Like most hardware manufacturers like HTC, Motorola, LG, etc., they don't appreciate software, not in the way Apple, Microsoft, and Google do. They're handset makers and that's their goal. The last thing they want to do is have their own developer conferences and APIs. It's still cheaper for them to let Google do most of the OS and API work and the manufacturers only provide a custom shell or launcher or skin. The fact that Samsung got this big without a custom fork of Android would support the idea that they don't need to "own their own OS".

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post #136 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

It's almost as if Microsoft built it with this enterprise mindset; it reminds me a bit like a corporate dashboard for some operations manager.

Ha, that hits the nail on the head. I always hated those, they were always so poorly designed.

In a way, Windows 8 is the opposite of Ive's minimalist vision.
post #137 of 299

I hope I wasn't the only one to notice this:  "...the media's continued enrapturement with Android..."

 

Does Dilger know that OSX has a built-in spell checker?

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #138 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Maybe, but I don't think it's likely. Like most hardware manufacturers like HTC, Motorola, LG, etc., they don't appreciate software, not in the way Apple, Microsoft, and Google do. They're handset makers and that's their goal. The last thing they want to do is have their own developer conferences and APIs. It's still cheaper for them to let Google do most of the OS and API work and the manufacturers only provide a custom shell or launcher or skin. The fact that Samsung got this big without a custom fork of Android would support the idea that they don't need to "own their own OS".

You can't compare Samsung to the other OEMs, as they've pretty much been the ONLY one to succeed with Android. Hate them all you want, but Samsung is smart and knows who to copy. They've been one of the few who understand why Apple succeeds and have blatantly tried to copy that formula. The next steps are better materials (rumored) and complete vertical integration of hardware and software.
post #139 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

You can't compare Samsung to the other OEMs, as they've pretty much been the ONLY one to succeed with Android. Hate them all you want, but Samsung is smart and knows who to copy. They've been one of the few who understand why Apple succeeds and have blatantly tried to copy that formula. The next steps are better materials (rumored) and complete vertical integration of hardware and software.

I agree. Samsung has created their own ecosystem:

  • Samsung Apps
  • Samsung Hub
  • Game Hub
  • Media Hub (US only)
  • Learning Hub / Music Hub / Video Hub
  • S Beam
  • Samsung AllShare Play & Control
  • Samsung AllShare Cast (WiFi Display)
  • Mirroring & Extention
  • Samsung AllShare Framework
  • Samsung S Suggest
  • S Translator
  • S Health
  • S Voice Drive
  • S Pen Experience
  • S Note
  • S Planner
  • ChatOn
  • WatchOn electronic program guide
  • Story Album


Many people fail to mention, however, that Samsung doesn't ship a Samsung Galaxy S4 smartphone. The Samsung Galaxy S4 smartphone is actually an entire product line of more than one dozen models.

Many people also like to mention the importance of choice. If choice were so important then why does only one company really compete well with the Apple iPhone.

Samsung is an existential threat to the future of Google Android.
post #140 of 299
"then (IBM) with its PowerPC chip initiative that breathed its last gasp of PC air in 2005"

Wasn't Apple also a major part of that PowerPC initiative?
post #141 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsocolt View Post

I'm sorry there guy, that is a delusional piece of journalism!
You need to look at the real world and how you Iconic company you so odvously worship has fallen Way behind its competitors !! Take there half ass attempt at a larger screen !! Turn your I phone 5 sideways use it's own camera and you have a picture that doesn't even fit the screen! HUGE FAIL!!
A desperate attempt to release a candy colored interface that's using interface adaptations from everyone, filters , parallax a STILL Unfinished Maps , Siri that's so slow in its response makes it useless..
Oh and the public just can't wait for the brand new Plastic iPhone 5S. ( guess going green isn't that important anymore ) all with that same size Usless longer screen! Face the facts .. This is not your Steve Jobs Apple anymore ! This is a company that's clearly lost its way Again , Even ask The Waz.

The next time you decide to do a pice on Apple try to make it at lease sound like you don't kneel down before a framed picture of an Apple on a pedestal and chant , they'll see , they'll see !

Sorry but you just sounded bitter through that entire article it was tough not to feel sorry for you.

 

If DED "sounded bitter" what do you think you sound like?

Woz not "Waz." and iPhone, not "I Phone". But of course how would you know that...? Oh yes, because you're an "Apple fan" and you "care" so much about Apple. Hint: real Apple fans can detect feigned concern over Apple's competitiveness.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by enature View Post

Daniel Eran Dilger (DED) - a known cheerleader of Cook's misguided leadership - goes overboard in verbosity trying to hide the obvious - Cook's policies led to one of the largest shareholder losses in the history and.... And Cook is not done yet. Soon AAPL price will fall under $400 and will have $3XX prices tag.
 
DED uses every tactic under the sun - from the decade old failings of Wintel to the unquestionably gloried and revolutionary accomplishments of Apple during Job's era - to cover up Cook's recent losses and portray iOS as the best thing in mobile platforms.... Gimme a break!
 
Cook - an undisputed chain-supply guru and a spreadsheet genius - coasted on Job's vision for a year, which got AAPL above $700. Having no guts to make radical changes - like increasing iPhone screen size above 4" or fixing unreliable iCloud - Cook just continues to coast while AAPL tumbles to $600 to $500 to $400 to...  over $250 billion lost and counting.... I guess the next DED piece will be even more prolix and defensive.  

 

Is the Angry Pitchfork Brigade still calling for Cook's head? Please.

Your argument against Cook boils down to a highly selective grab bag of bad headlines and biased opinions:

1. Stock plummets! -- theory: it's Cook's fault, not Wall Street's bubble pricing of APPL

2. iOS is not the best thing in mobile platforms -- based on objective evidence or subjective opinion?

3. iPhone screen size -- too small? Theory: a bigger screen will fix AAPL prices.

4. iCloud "unreliable" -- based on objective metrics or subjective opinion?

 

DED doesn't have to be "defensive". Just positive.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #142 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

The last thing they want to do is have their own developer conferences and APIs. It's still cheaper for them to let Google do most of the OS and API work and the manufacturers only provide a custom shell or launcher or skin

Cheaper yes, but also much less profitable. I don't know about you but I don't want Apple and Samsung to be Coke and Pepsi especially since I prefer RC Cola which I can no longer find.
Edited by dasanman69 - 6/23/13 at 1:26pm
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post #143 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Cheaper yes, but also much less profitable. I don't know about you but I don't want Apple and Samsung to be Coke and Pepsi especially since I prefer RC Cola which I can no longer find.

 

I don't understand. Why "also much less profitable"? How does it affect their profit?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #144 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


It's almost as if Microsoft built it with this enterprise mindset; it reminds me a bit like a corporate dashboard for some operations manager. Also, how much time do people spend staring at their home screen/desktop. iOS has always been a springboard for apps. I think Apple has more work to do in terms of app organization and app curation but I don't see iOS changing its focus away from being a springboard to great apps.

 

You may be right about MS. The designs of Android and WP8 make more sense if you think of the OS as primarily an information hub and secondly a vehicle for launching apps. Widgets and live-tiles are not such absurd ideas if your first priority is to deliver relevant data to the user as efficiently as possible. For example, presenting the weather or the next appointment on the home screen saves the user from having to dig into dedicated apps for the information. Google seems to subscribe to this "information first" philosophy as evidenced by its effort on products like Google Now, and by its design of android, which reserves the homescreen mainly for information (in the form of widgets) while storing most apps in the app drawer.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 6/23/13 at 2:35pm
post #145 of 299
I strenuously object to the description of the WinTel partnership as a "ball of greasy hair saturated in Drano". Hair at one time probably made someone feel better and Drano serves a useful purpose. I do not think WinTel ever did either.
post #146 of 299

iOS is pretty much dead with the release of the 7th version. They need to put Scott Forstall back in charge. The sooner they realize that , the better.

post #147 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

A long article that says very little.

Indeed. Doesn't prove the headline, doesn't even stick to one gist. In one paragraph it's a history of desktop computers, another it's a review of iOS 7, next name calling.

Saddest part is that this is typical DED writing. They all generally suck in terms of writing skill and yet no one on the staff has bothered to point this out to him
post #148 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Apple isn't making a huge UI change because what they introduced in 2007 still works. No one has demonstrated that the grid of icons no longer works or something else is much better. 

 

I agree that a static grid still works, but that's not saying much.  It also worked for Windows Mobile when you clicked its Programs button.  It also worked for the Palm Pilot.  Heck, it worked for the original Mac.

 

I mildly disagree that no one has shown anything better, as I do think that a static grid of app icons is misusing the space.  Active icons/widgets can be very handy as little windows into an app's info / status.

 

Quote:
With Windows 8 and its live tiles how much can you really glean staring at the screen?

 

Here, I'm in total agreement with you that the colors and arrangement (or lack of) of the Windows tiles are a mess to view.   I think they had a good idea, but screwed up the artistic implementation.

 

--

 

Btw, I kept meaning to find time to reply to a post you made a week or two ago.  In it, you proposed something along the lines that perhaps Apple was trying to mature iOS slightly away from the even-a-baby-can-do-it style.   (Please correct me if I got that wrong.)

 

I think that's very insightful, and yes, that would be a major move for Apple, relatively speaking.  I think it has to be done... that the training wheels eventually have to come off... as people in general get more savvy about using smartphones.  

 

I even think there's a good place for a switch between child - medium - expert modes.  Most especially I think that tablets are way overdue for having multiple user profiles.

post #149 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by enature View Post

- Cook's policies led to one of the largest shareholder losses in the history and....

Hardly. If you go back and look at the actual facts you'll see that the drop was almost entirely to do with the so called expert bloggers and analysts putting out article after article about issues, delays, sales failures (based on not reaching the same analysts extremely overblown estimates)
post #150 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by enature View Post

For Steve Jobs, "the best" had a simple meaning - the best product is the one that takes the least effort to use. The Principle of Least Effort was inseparable from Steve Jobs.

 

Cook, on the other hand, complicates the definition of "the best" by adding considerations that he himself is good at - production logistics, cost/profit analysis, supply chain considerations. 

 

Hunh?  There are a lot of published sources out there from which one can reasonably deduce what Steve Jobs means by "the best" product.  But how were you ever able to deduce what Tim Cook's thinking is on the matter?  Did you ask him and that's what he told you? Were you able to glean some hidden meaning from the keynote presentations?  Otherwise, this is all just a bunch of speculative B.S. about what motivates T.C.

post #151 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Thanks. Yes, I think Steve put Ive in charge of the physical and Scott in charge of the virtual for a reason.

Yes but how much of that was due to Forstall's skill as a designer and programmer versus loyalty to another NeXT employee and the fact that Forstall had similar notions about skeuomorphic design etc

And remember that Steve allegedly told Tim not to ever ask What Would Steve Do? If this is true then it was a blessing to go in new directions etc. Including a less 'realistic' UI and a more collaborative work flow. Something that wouldn't have worked so great given the rumors that Forstall was a grade A jerk who refused to take feedback from anyone but Steve. So that would have added to reasons why Forstall and Apple weren't going to continue together.
post #152 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I don't understand. Why "also much less profitable"? How does it affect their profit?

What profit? My point is that they're not making any. Yes it's cheaper to use Android but hasn't benefited anyone except Samsung.
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post #153 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post


Good comparison with the auto industry (surprisingly an industry that compares well with the computer industry on a number of levels). Also a reason why you'll see Samsung start making its own "engine" soon.

 

That's why deep in my heart, I am praying that Apple acquires Tesla.  I sincerely believe that the Apple way could be applied at great benefit to industries other than tech.  Jobs himself stated that if he had the time and opportunity, he would have wanted to get into the auto business and fix it.  He also said that the auto companies used to do 'integrated' really well.

 

I also like to imagine what the airline industry would be like if Apple took over one of the carriers.


Edited by tundraboy - 6/23/13 at 3:35pm
post #154 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by abazigal View Post

IMO, Scott simply had to go. Ios6 just plain stank (I feel it was the weakest release in ios history)

Given that the only UI change was a totally unneeded moving shadow trick and it released with a huge wifi bug that screwed a significant percent of folks for a couple of updates, I am inclined to agree
Edited by charlituna - 6/23/13 at 3:41pm
post #155 of 299

Well said. Steve Jobs was a genius at understanding that a well designed quality built product is functional, intuitive and thus easy to use. Thus Apple products generate a great deal of customer satisfaction and loyalty. 

post #156 of 299

So true,

 

And for some reason, Microsoft still to this day believes they can just sit back and "MAINLY" only offer Windows OS, Office whatever, and backend Server OSes, over and over, and just keep raking cash in over and over, for recycled never redone code.

 

Sad part is, there will seem always be people who shell out that $100 a year for Windows, and now $100 a year for Office.  Damn, sickening.

 

Think about this they have 20,000,000+ people giving them $4,000,000,000 or more a year?  For recycled code with barely any improvements and this is just in America (US).  Free money, for LIFE, for Microsoft.  They don't even have to DO ANYTHING.  Just call it Windows 9, Office 2015, 4 billion in the US that year... GEES. for nothin.  It's insane and then what do they do with that money?  Just pay there 5,000+ employees to sit around and do nothing.  :)

 

Silly-ness

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post #157 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Povilas View Post

No difference. Since it's the same hardware everywhere i think "runs fine" by your standards is f'ed up by mine.

Turning off background app updating helped my 4s immensely. With battery drain.

post #158 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

I will tell you a story.

 

Here in Portugal (and Spain) Android is much more mainstream than iPhones, for a variety of reasons. One of them is that the nearest Apple Store is in another country (Spain), and the second is that Samsung and their ads are everywhere.

 

One of those things that every android user knows (and must know, really) is how to switch Wifi, 3g, bluetooth, etc. on and off. It's actually easy, and they have to do it... you will realize why, soon enough.

 

A few days ago, a few americans arrived here to study during the semester. iPhones everywhere! Since I own a mac and am a good-looking son of a b*cth, the girls (and the boys lol) approached me and asked if I knew how to set the internet on their iPhones. On iPhones, the process is very easy because you don't even need to configure the network, it's only username and password.

 

First question (by me):

 

-Ok, I know how to do it. Can you please go to settings and Wifi? They answered...

-"How do you do that?!".

 

After a brief conversation, they (all of them!) said that they never got that deep into the settings app (lol). The bluetooth was always on. The Wifi was always on. GPS was on. 3G was on. One of them was really hot so I was turned on too. Everything was on.

 

For an Android user, it is unthinkable to have the phone in those same conditions and have more than 2h battery life, even on "high end" devices. Things like that are only a privilege to iPhone users, so when they complain that their phones only hold a charge during 8h, I laugh.

 

It's like people saying that the S4 and the note have much bigger batteries, so they have a much better battery life... Meanwhile the iPhone and iPad wins every test when both screens are on, and on extensive tasks there is no contest.

 

Apple is doing a great job with their mobile processors and batteries. The a6 was a marvel, the things that they manage to do with small batteries are great. Can't wait for the end of the year...

Very well described.  However, I think here is an advantage that Apple should exploit.  Instead of making the 5S as thin as 5, Apple should increase its battery life to 12 hours.  Then Apple will silence a lot of the bashings from the media I truly believe.  

post #159 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Then Apple will silence a lot of the bashings from the media I truly believe.

What, via battery life? I don't think so.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
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Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
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post #160 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Then Apple will silence a lot of the bashings from the media I truly believe.

What, via battery life? I don't think so.

Besides they would scream Steve would've never allow a fatter device, so the stock would drop to 2 dollars and the moon would fall into wall street.

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