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Editorial: iOS 7 shows how Apple is leading mobile computing - Page 2

post #41 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Words can't describe just how fine I would be with that.

Watch their stock halve overnight.
And 80% the next day for there chromey software.

Very good read, always enjoy the appleinsider apple sum ups.
post #42 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by dperetti View Post

Correct for designers : http://designerscomplaining.tumblr.com
True for developers as well : http://ios7redesign.tumblr.com/tagged/ios-developers
Haha so yo point me to two tumblr links. And that equates to everyone? Whatever.
post #43 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by poke View Post

2. I still can't believe how bad Android looks when I see comparison shots. I mean, Android 4.x is a huge improvement over 2.x, but it's still a huge mess.

That's Samsung's doing in the second photo stock Android is much cleaner than that.
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post #44 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Words can't describe just how fine I would be with that.

Watch their stock halve overnight.

Yes it might but it's much better to control one's destiny than to have it forced upon one. It would be wise for Google to backstab Samsung before Samsung stabs them in the back.
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post #45 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A variety of other iconic things that have defined iOS since 2007 are also getting stripped away in one massive housecleaning. The strong borders of buttons, the heavy bevels, gloss effects, dark shadows and the earthly colors of leather and felt are all being retired like last season's fashions.

In its place, Apple has put together a luminous, clarified and light user experience where actions are highlighted with distinctive color. Anyone copying iOS 7 will not be able to do so with subtly. iOS 7 looks different. It does not, however, really work differently in ways that are difficult to learn and discover. Apple didn't hide the Start menu.

 

 

A longer than usual feature deserves a longer than usual reply.
 
I disagree with the thesis that Apple made these changes to make iOS 7 hard to copy (or at least obvious if it is copied). If you watch the WWDC video "What's New is iOS User Interface Design," they take you through step by step an example redesign (the Mail app) and you can see that the reason they are doing what they are doing is to achieve minimalism. They start with a blank screen and try to figure out the essential minimum stuff to add. 
 
It's Jony Ive's "essentiality" design aesthetic applied to GUI. But the problem is, the real world faces certain limitations that the virtual world does not. It's hard for things to be perfect in the real world, so when Jony makes a Macbook Pro with beautiful lines and insanely minute tolerances and tiny speaker holes drilled by laser, it's bloody impressive. You combine that with a minimalist design, where all the clutter is gone, and suddenly there's nothing left for the eye to go to *but* the sheer quality. And that works great. 
 
But in the virtual world, perfection is free, and therefore not impressive. There are no laws of physics to overcome: if you want a perfectly straight line, or a perfectly circular circle you just draw one. Forget tiny laser holes being impressive: in the virtual world there are mathematical points that have *no* dimensions ;). So if you take the approach of ruthlessly stripping away all the clutter, until all there is nothing to look at but the precision/quality, people are not impressed. 
 
So what *does* constitute "impressive" in a virtual world? Well, the most impressed I've seen people looking at a computer screen is seeing very realistic simulations: such as a simulation of a human face, or weather, or realistic physics. That's right, we have stumbled upon a great universal symmetry: the real world is impressive to the extent it approaches the perfection of the virtual world (e.g. Macbook Pro design), and the virtual world is impressive to the extent it approaches (or mimics) the real world. 
 
In other words Steve was right, the way to make an impressive GUI (and he was the commensurate salesman) is skeu.. skeu... that other thing.
post #46 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

It would be wise for Google to backstab Samsung before Samsung stabs them in the back.

Do you really think Samsung would do a truly dedicated fork of Android? Or even switch to their old software?

Originally Posted by asdasd

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Originally Posted by asdasd

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post #47 of 299

The reason why Windows 8 Metro and Android adopted simplified and textureless interface designs is very simple : these OSes have to target a variety of screen sizes and scale the interface gracefully. They didn't do this just because they thought it looked better and "modern", it was just the obvious way to go for them.

 

iOS was stuck in supporting only one screen size until the iPad, but the transition to iPad apps was not handled via auto-layout APIs and devs had to manually redo and rethink their interface for the iPad (which is a good thing and why there are much less tablet optimized apps on Android, and note how MS kept Windows phone 8 a separate entity).  So devs had the luxury of being able to make texture rich apps without having to care about dealing with scaling issues on iOS.

 

It was only with the iPhone 5 release that iOS devs were forced to remake their interfaces with flexible layouts (using the new auto-layout APIs introduced in iOS 6) but even then it was only vertically, which is something many apps were already dealing with (because of double-height status bars). And since it only meant two different screen sizes for iPhones, they could still keep using textured navigation bars bitmaps by targeting at most four different widths (two screen sizes, portrait and landscape) if their app supported device rotation.

 

To me it's very obvious that the iOS 7 design and auto-layout APIs aims at freeing iOS from its fixed screen size paradigm before anything else. This was the real "technical hurdle" behind the lack of bigger screen iPhone from Apple (and split screen multitasking), and it will be fixed with iOS 7.

 

Note: I conveniently left out 2x retina transitions from my post, has they don't really affect apps layouts. I also think that if Apple introduces a bigger screen iPhone it will keep the same 324 dpi, but extending the pixel width and height.

post #48 of 299
A brilliant exposition on why Apple's whole ecosystem strategy will always beat the 'cheap and nasty' strategies adopted by the vast majority of IT suppliers for the last 40 years. Companies like Microsoft and Google, and the companies that ultimately depend on them, deserve all the pain they are currently suffering, and will continue to suffer, until they learn the lessons that Steve Jobs taught us all - design, re-design and re-re-design until the product is good enough to produce and market in the first place.
post #49 of 299
iOS 7 is the worst thing to happen to Android, and practically the death-knell for Windows Phone.
post #50 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Do you really think Samsung would do a truly dedicated fork of Android? Or even switch to their old software?

Why not? Amazon did it quite easily. Samsung already has some proprietary apps so how hard would it be for them to create their own app store? Going with their own OS would be suicide. A new OS at this point would only come from a new player with little to lose.
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post #51 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldfullerton View Post

A brilliant exposition on why Apple's whole ecosystem strategy will always beat the 'cheap and nasty' strategies adopted by the vast majority of IT suppliers for the last 40 years. Companies like Microsoft and Google, and the companies that ultimately depend on them, deserve all the pain they are currently suffering, and will continue to suffer, until they learn the lessons that Steve Jobs taught us all - design, re-design and re-re-design until the product is good enough to produce and market in the first place.

I think it's rather late for them to adopt that philosophy.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #52 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by the cool gut View Post

I'm a pretty big Apple fan, but reading this was pretty embarrassing.  The concensus is, Apple was just keeping up with everyone else with iOS7.

No, it's partially a defense against those "experts" who say that ALL of what's new in iOS is stolen from others, whilst completely ignoring all the other new improvements, or what iOS already brings to the table.
post #53 of 299
I made an account just to tell you how excellent this article is. Thank you for putting things in context, and getting right to the heart of what makes Apple special.
post #54 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Why not? Amazon did it quite easily. Samsung already has some proprietary apps so how hard would it be for them to create their own app store? Going with their own OS would be suicide. A new OS at this point would only come from a new player with little to lose.

I just think if they'd planned to do that, they would have done it by now. They're sort of in their stride right now, and a huge upheaval would...

On second thought, I'm all for Samsung doing that, too.

Originally Posted by asdasd

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post #55 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Why not? Amazon did it quite easily. Samsung already has some proprietary apps so how hard would it be for them to create their own app store? Going with their own OS would be suicide. A new OS at this point would only come from a new player with little to lose.

 

Supposedly Samsung has scrapped Bada, but Tizen is still lurking in the shadows in case the opportunity presents itself.

post #56 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

No, it's partially a defense against those "experts" who say that ALL of what's new in iOS is stolen from others, whilst completely ignoring all the other new improvements, or what iOS already brings to the table.

I've always been told that a 'expert' is only a person that's done something before you and seeing as how none of these 'experts' have actually had a hand in developing a OS I never give much weight to their opinions.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #57 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

Supposedly Samsung has scrapped Bada, but Tizen is still lurking in the shadows in case the opportunity presents itself.

Last I saw Tizen it looked like the type of OS Playskool would use on a toy smartphone.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #58 of 299
Modesty, thy name is DED,
come rule the day
with truth spake clear
Banished tempers—pass away.
The velvet mouth hath roared
So clear,
the voice-
the beast, King Kong
with tempered chest, pounds
"Take that"—ill-mouthed trolls.
Away!

Edited by mhikl - 6/22/13 at 7:05pm

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

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When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

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post #59 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

I will tell you a story.

 

Here in Portugal (and Spain) Android is much more mainstream than iPhones, for a variety of reasons. One of them is that the nearest Apple Store is in another country (Spain), and the second is that Samsung and their ads are everywhere.

 

One of those things that every android user knows (and must know, really) is how to switch Wifi, 3g, bluetooth, etc. on and off. It's actually easy, and they have to do it... you will realize why, soon enough.

 

A few days ago, a few americans arrived here to study during the semester. iPhones everywhere! Since I own a mac and am a good-looking son of a b*cth, the girls (and the boys lol) approached me and asked if I knew how to set the internet on their iPhones. On iPhones, the process is very easy because you don't even need to configure the network, it's only username and password.

 

First question (by me):

 

-Ok, I know how to do it. Can you please go to settings and Wifi? They answered...

-"How do you do that?!".

 

After a brief conversation, they (all of them!) said that they never got that deep into the settings app (lol). The bluetooth was always on. The Wifi was always on. GPS was on. 3G was on. One of them was really hot so I was turned on too. Everything was on.

 

For an Android user, it is unthinkable to have the phone in those same conditions and have more than 2h battery life, even on "high end" devices. Things like that are only a privilege to iPhone users, so when they complain that their phones only hold a charge during 8h, I laugh.

 

It's like people saying that the S4 and the note have much bigger batteries, so they have a much better battery life... Meanwhile the iPhone and iPad wins every test when both screens are on, and on extensive tasks there is no contest.

 

Apple is doing a great job with their mobile processors and batteries. The a6 was a marvel, the things that they manage to do with small batteries are great. Can't wait for the end of the year...

 

Interesting observation. I am American and I do know how to turn on and turn off all of my iPhone's features, however, as you observed, I leave everything on all the time. Because frankly, it feels like something one ought to be able to do. Same on my Mac: wifi and Bluetooth are left on, and the battery life is as Apple promised.

 

Many, many years ago, I had a Compaq iPAQ, which was an early color Windows CE-based PDA. This was one of the early models that had a reflective color LCD, but with a CCFL backlight (well, technically it was side-lit). The iPAQ could be used for several hours with the backlight turned off, but if you turned it on, it would drain a fully charged battery in less than 1 hour. Basically, it wasn't really designed to be used with a backlight constantly on. Compaq sold an external battery pack--which added a CF card slot (and doubled the thickness of the iPAQ). Your story of forcing the user to manage power manually feels like my experience with the iPAQ: it sucks when coaxing usable battery life out of a device is the user's responsibility. The device ought to be designed to just work, and when necessary, manage its own power.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #60 of 299
It's a well considered article. So the author isn't a writer per se, but he has a lot of really thoughtful things to contribute, and i'll concede him the snarkiness -- why are only Android fans allowed to be snarky? The fact is if you took the "who's copying who more" thing to court, Google would be put away for life. I think you're gonna see dramatic UI changes in upcoming Android skins like Touchwiz etc. Android will be redesigned too for the next Nexus device too.

iOS 7 is a very strong release, and I've found that much of the design has already disappeared after a week of use. My only concern is that some of the GPU intensive flourishes have dramatic affect on battery life in the final release. As of right now, iOS 7 absolutely crushes my iPhone 5's battery.
post #61 of 299
This was a fantastic article ! Great job.
post #62 of 299
iOS7 beta is really buggy - crashes, battery issues and whatnot. The new UX paradigm doesn't work in some places - there is a fine line between "only showing the data" and "showing a confusing jumble things" where UX elements are not clearly marked as such and mix with the content.

Nevertheless, there is absolutely no going back to iOS 6. I am sure they're going to work out the kinks; I don't think they can pull it all off for GM, but by this time next year it should be stellar...
post #63 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by poke View Post

Two thoughts:

 

1. I think you really hit the nail on the head with the importance of motion in iOS 7. I have reservations about some aspects of the design, but where it really shines is the way the animation conveys the logic of the way different screens are related to one another. I think that's really what Jony Ive was going for and everything else (including the flatter design) is in service of that. Contrast with WP7, where they've tried to copy print design and the transition animations are strange and jarring and entirely unconnected to anything that's happen (it's like they decided there wasn't enough motion and threw in some random transition effects to spice things up). I really like this aspect of the iOS 7 design approach.

 

2. I still can't believe how bad Android looks when I see comparison shots. I mean, Android 4.x is a huge improvement over 2.x, but it's still a huge mess.

 

+1 on point 1. This is the reason iOS 7 is great. It's not something you see in static shots.

 

It's a physical UI. iOS now has a physics simulator built in, and this is the reason. Previously, Apple had provided nice standard transitions for navigation UIs and modals. With iOS 7 they went a step further and are providing a physics simulator for all views - anything that moves in your UI can move according to physical properties, like a spring, or gravity, etc.

 

The funny thing is I had just tried to implement a spring like movement in iOS6 and it was far from trivial. In fact, I never got it right, I only got to a kinda sorta approximation using 3rd party libraries (to my defense this was trying to move (N) views in a convincing manner, not just one, and they had a physical relationship to each other). I was surprised it was so hard. I wanted to get it perfect and most 3rd party libs just didn't do that - animations looked like they look on Android.

With iOS 7 the same thing is a matter of calling the right APIs.  

post #64 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I just think if they'd planned to do that, they would have done it by now. They're sort of in their stride right now, and a huge upheaval would...

On second thought, I'm all for Samsung doing that, too.

They've done pretty much everything else but do that. They've skinned it to death and barely mention Android in their product launches.
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post #65 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

"WinTel PC efficiently generated billions of dollars in revenue that was funneled right back into development at Intel and Microsoft. Between 1995 and 2005, WinTel did little more than plug up the pipes of technology, holding everyone back while collecting incredible revenues but delivering only the most minor dribble of updates."

 

You see similarities between this and Apple with iOS?

 

If you equate the PC in 1995 to the iPod in 2001:

 

in five years Microsoft delivered a PC running Office faster and playing more, nicer games and running Win2000 

in ten years Microsoft delivered a PC running Office faster and playing more, nicer games and running a beta of Longhorn

 

in five years, Apple had delivered a series of iPods, now playing video, podcasts and games - a vast improvement upon the simple G1 iPod

in ten years, Apple had delivered iPhone 4S with Safari, Siri and Retina Display and iPad 2, ushering in the multitouch smartphone, tablet and App Stores

 

That's an incredible difference in the pace of innovation

post #66 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

They've done pretty much everything else but do that. They've skinned it to death and barely mention Android in their product launches.

I fully expect the Galaxy S5 to run the "GalaxyOS". Either a forked version of Android or Tizen that is compatible with Android apps but runs its own Samsung Galaxy Store apps too.
post #67 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

I've always been told that a 'expert' is only a person that's done something before you and seeing as how none of these 'experts' have actually had a hand in developing a OS I never give much weight to their opinions.

Exactly, hence the sarcastic quotation marks. That Tumblr account someone posted was as annoying as can be.

I detest wannabe artsy critic types. What's the saying? Those who can't, teach. Those who can't do that, critique. Ugh.
post #68 of 299
I very much appreciate the layered approach of iOS 7, the layered approach portends greater customization as does the functionality the layered approach has already made possible. I believe the layered approach has decoupled certain aspects of design from the underlying functionality which is the real genius behind iOS 7.

I do not like the light, colorful approach, however. In my opinion, Apple listened to detractors far too much; preferring animated effects over gradients, shadows and textures. I prefer the semi-transparent black glass interface design Apple has used which I consider effective, efficient and elegant.

I especially prefer textured buttons that make the button functionality obvious. Apps do not necessarily need texture but removing texture from buttons removes visual clues. Indeed, skeumorphism is often beneficial in providing visual cues to product behavior.

Apple has simply substituted certain UI effects for different UI effects.

In my opinion, the ideal is somewhere between the two with each effect used to indicate features and functionality as necessary. I would much prefer if Apple offered iOS 7 features and functionality with a choice of semi-transparent frosted glass design (for white iPhones) and semi-transparent black glass design (for black iPhones).

The end result is that app icons have lost some gradients, shadows and textures in exchange for animation effects. Does the exchange actually improve the usability? In some instances I believe it does but in some instances I believe it does not. I tend to believe there was a happy middle ground I would have preferred. I am interested in how the public votes with their dollars.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 6/22/13 at 9:07pm
post #69 of 299

To me at least, the parallax effect actually gives a better impression of depth than the fake 3d look of iOS 6. 

 

I have the iOS 7 beta on my iPhone, and each time I go back to my iPad (which is running iOS 6) I notice how the home screen feels actually flatter than iOS 7, despite all the glossiness and shadowing effects in iOS 6.

 

And for those who experience heavy battery drain running the BETA (is that hard to understand, BETA?), it doesn't have anything to do with the motion/parallax effects. There's a very specific bug in Beta 1 with the App Store/ iTunes store process draining the battery in the background even when the device sleeps. This bug only happen on certain devices that where restored with an iTunes backup (something Apple warns against, if you are a real dev you should know that.).

post #70 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by VL-Tone View Post

To me at least, the parallax effect actually gives a better impression of depth than the fake 3d look of iOS 6. 

I have the iOS 7 beta on my iPhone, and each time I go back to my iPad (which is running iOS 6) I notice how the home screen feels actually flatter than iOS 7, despite all the glossiness and shadowing effects in iOS 6.

I like the parallax effect as well but I like the gradients, shadows and textures quite a bit as well. I suspect that Apple is laying the foundation for increased customization of the user interface though which may be an improvement.

In my opinion, some apps had far too much of a pretense of skeumorphism from gradients, shadows and textures. In particular; Game Center, Find My Friends and a few others seemed inappropriate. The legal pad skeumorphism of Notes was quite pleasant to me, however (more functionality would be nice though).
post #71 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

 

That's an incredible difference in the pace of innovation

I dunno about that. Mankind's knowledge and expertise increase exponentially with time. Skipping back a few years, the pace will always appear laggard compared to today, when the rate of change in the pace (acceleration) was the same.

post #72 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

There is a great deal of conscious misdirection and mis-interpretation going on in this article, so while I agree with the thrust of it and the main conclusions are inescapable, it comes across as disingenuous because of the obvious duplicity.

For instance when discussing the charge that iOS 7 has borrowed it's typography from Windows 8 (it clearly has), the basis of the debate is slyly changed to "who invented Helvetica anyway!" which is beside the point. The charge is about the use of a thin font in a large sans-serif typeface as a major UI element and styling theme. Who invented Helvetica is actually irrelevant to the charge.

There are more incidents of the same thing but any habitual reader of this site if fully aware of the authors tendency to cheerlead in this manner.

I would argue that these articles are unduly wordy as well and could well use a second author or editor to both look over the original authors work and edit it down to a much shorter, "punchier" piece. I guess no one appreciates a good editor anymore and everyone thinks their every thought and word is "gold."

Agreed. It's a lot of personal opinion and personal attacks. Comments like "no one noticed or complained about Windows anyway" is just ignorant of the facts and bad research. I use a PC and tons of people (myself included) HATE windows 8 and will never upgrade to it.

And people here use the word "troll" too often here. People who take the time to make honest comments are not "trolls". Just because you don't agree with their comments and are an uber Apple fan with blinders on, doesn't mean everyone who is critical once in a while is a troll.
post #73 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post


I understand Gazoobee's frustration. I too agree with the gist of the article, but even for an editorial the childish slams and name calling against Microsoft and Google just seems unnecessary. I don't think it's too hard to write an article without so much snark.

It pretty much reads like this: "Apple innovates, Apple makes all the profits, and look at these f**king losers; why do they even bother? Why don't they just f**k off and die?"

 

I know - I thought this is what the apple-hater crowd does.  C'mon Dan we're better than that.  Don't write flame bait or discredit your otherwise effective arguments with juvenile cheerleading and name-calling.  I promise I'll post comments in the more grown up and classy articles - but if you keep on with this one-sided juvenile attitude, then I'l give up and doubt everything you write.

post #74 of 299

Here's what's going on:  When it comes to highly complex, mass market consumer products, integrated manufacturing and design will eventually beat the non-integrated (or 'diffused' for lack of a better term) model EXCEPT when overwhelming market power is able to blunt the advantages of the integrated approach.

 

When competition is so intense that manufacturers are forced to eke out the last ounce of performance and efficiency out of their products, they will pour more and more effort into optimizing and fine tuning the product and its components to eliminate every last bit of inefficiency, whether engineering or economic.  An automaker can't do this if it is using an engine that is designed by the engine maker to be sold to several auto companies.  A smartphone company likewise is hampered if its OS is designed to be a one-size-fits-all solution.  Sure, early on, the auto industry, as the outgrowth of the carriage industry, had independent engine, chassis, and coach builders.  But in the beginning, autos were not a mass market and competition wasn't that intense.  Today, all auto companies and their products are highly integrated. The ones outsourcing their engines are low volume specialty shops selling tremendously expensive product.

 

With a massive marketing and advertising budget, Samsung was able to give the illusion that its product is as good and as refined as the iPhone.  Well, latest news is that Samsung has cut back smartphone component orders significantly and the stock market has responded.  As this relentless drive to optimize, refine, and perfect smartphones continues, the distance between iOS and Android will get wider and wider.  We see it now in the vast difference in energy efficiency.  There is no magic bullet in extending battery up time per charge, it's all hard painstaking work designing all your components including the OS to operate efficiently by itself and in concert.

 

The exception of course is the Windows PC but that's because Microsoft's monopoly was able to neutralize all competition and so there was no need to put any effort into optimizing, fine tuning and perfecting.  Without any meaningful competition, we thought we should be happy enough just to know that when Windows starts to get bogged down, we can always reboot, and when the arterial clogging becomes unbearable, we reinstall.  What foolish dolts we mortals were.

 

All of Apple's smartphone competitors know that they have to integrate or die.  But unlike Apple, none of them has the breadth and depth of hardware and software skills and knowhow that are required to run a successful mobile computing company.


Edited by tundraboy - 6/22/13 at 9:56pm
post #75 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

 

Relax. This is a beta. It is not meant to be used by anyone other than developers and only on testing devices. All beta releases in the past were like this and sometimes worst.

I am relaxed. I just said that on 4/4S it's unsuabale.

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

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Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

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post #76 of 299

Apple has led the mobile space for some time now! I cannot speak to IOS 7....will wait until I can use the final release product on Apple hardware.

Great article...well thought out an put together....

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

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Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

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post #77 of 299
I think what has been unfortunately missed is the main reason for the huge iOS change and that is since Ive was put in charge of all design, you had a designer, not a developer, designing the UI. These changes, or at least some, could have easily been introduced and probably would have been if Ive was in charge earlier.

But that is the history, and Apple will have to take its lumps for "copying" until future iterations of iOS when Ive really gets into stride.

Just imagine if this was a fairly quick iOS release, considering the turnover and turmoil at Apple after Steve. I think Apple is settled down now and we will see more Apple magic very soon.
post #78 of 299

This is perhaps the most insightful and best written piece on AppleInsider I've ever read.

 

Though the analogy of "WinTel as a hair clog in the pipe of progress" is harsh -- it's also very apt. As much as corporate America was enamored of their dominance -- it failed to realize how they achieved the dominance by stifling real progress.

 

Apple isn't making the classic mistake of the monopoly abuser -- they keep trying to obsolesce their own technology -- which shows they are still a company with legs and are not sitting on their hind ones. I think even an objective person would look a the numbers and the pace of their tech and see that they are the market leader in about 4 areas.

post #79 of 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

I will tell you a story.

 

Here in Portugal (and Spain) Android is much more mainstream than iPhones, for a variety of reasons. One of them is that the nearest Apple Store is in another country (Spain), and the second is that Samsung and their ads are everywhere.

 

One of those things that every android user knows (and must know, really) is how to switch Wifi, 3g, bluetooth, etc. on and off. It's actually easy, and they have to do it... you will realize why, soon enough.

 

A few days ago, a few americans arrived here to study during the semester. iPhones everywhere! Since I own a mac and am a good-looking son of a b*cth, the girls (and the boys lol) approached me and asked if I knew how to set the internet on their iPhones. On iPhones, the process is very easy because you don't even need to configure the network, it's only username and password.

 

First question (by me):

 

-Ok, I know how to do it. Can you please go to settings and Wifi? They answered...

-"How do you do that?!".

 

After a brief conversation, they (all of them!) said that they never got that deep into the settings app (lol). The bluetooth was always on. The Wifi was always on. GPS was on. 3G was on. One of them was really hot so I was turned on too. Everything was on.

 

For an Android user, it is unthinkable to have the phone in those same conditions and have more than 2h battery life, even on "high end" devices. Things like that are only a privilege to iPhone users, so when they complain that their phones only hold a charge during 8h, I laugh.

 

It's like people saying that the S4 and the note have much bigger batteries, so they have a much better battery life... Meanwhile the iPhone and iPad wins every test when both screens are on, and on extensive tasks there is no contest.

 

Apple is doing a great job with their mobile processors and batteries. The a6 was a marvel, the things that they manage to do with small batteries are great. Can't wait for the end of the year...

Ok, what this has at all to do with discussing beta software performance on a certain device model?

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

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Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

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post #80 of 299
All of these things that are coming to light, and this is just suppose to be a very early beta of the software. We went from 'That's all they got done in seven months?' to 'Damn, they did all that in only seven months?'

Can't wait to see the next beta release, I'm guessing the visual changes will be pretty severe. And in a good way.
"Picasso had a saying, 'Good artists copy, great artists steal.' And we've always been shameless about stealing great ideas."
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"Picasso had a saying, 'Good artists copy, great artists steal.' And we've always been shameless about stealing great ideas."
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